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African Americans Confront Lynching

African Americans Confront Lynching Author Christopher Waldrep
ISBN-10 074255273X
Release 2009
Pages 201
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This book examines African Americans' strategies for resisting white racial violence from the Civil War until the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 and up to the Clinton era. Christopher Waldrep's semi-biographical approach to the pioneers in the anti-lynching campaign portrays African Americans as active participants in the effort to end racial violence rather than as passive victims. In telling this more than 100-year-old story of violence and resistance, Waldrep describes how white Americans legitimized racial violence after the Civil War, and how black journalists campaigned against the violence by invoking the Constitution and the law as a source of rights. He shows how, toward the end of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, anti-lynching crusaders Ida B. Wells and Monroe Work adopted a more sociological approach, offering statistics and case studies to thwart white claims that a black propensity for crime justified racial violence. Waldrep describes how the NAACP, founded in 1909, represented an organized, even bureaucratic approach to the fight against lynching. Despite these efforts, racial violence continued after World War II, as racists changed tactics, using dynamite more than the rope or the gun. Waldrep concludes by showing how modern day hate crimes continue the lynching tradition, and how the courts and grass-roots groups have continued the tradition of resistance to racial violence. A rich selection of documents helps give the story a sense of immediacy. Sources include nineteenth-century eyewitness accounts of lynching, courtroom testimony of Ku Klux Klan victims, South Carolina senator Ben Tillman's 1907 defense of lynching, and the text of the first federal hate crimes law."



Enslaved Women in America

Enslaved Women in America Author Emily West
ISBN-10 9781442208735
Release 2014-12-05
Pages 160
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West offers an overview of the lives of enslaved women in America by using a broad chronological perspective, considering themes and issues in their lives from the colonial era through to the end of the Civil War. She compares the lives of enslaved women—sometimes exceptional and sometimes ordinary—across time and space with the lives of enslaved men, and with the white men and women who held them in bondage. West draws upon a wide range of evidence in evaluating enslaved women's lives and considers the major methodological issues they pose in order to build a composite, or overall, picture of enslaved womanhood through "snapshots'' of different women at various stages of their life-cycles.



Caring for Equality

Caring for Equality Author David McBride
ISBN-10 9781442260603
Release 2018-08-24
Pages 208
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In Caring for Equality David McBride chronicles the struggle by African Americans and their white allies to improve poor black health conditions as well as inadequate medical care—caused by slavery, racism, and discrimination—since the arrival of African slaves in America.



Crime Over Time

Crime Over Time Author Robyn Lincoln
ISBN-10 9781443824569
Release 2010-08-11
Pages 260
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Crime Over Time features original contributions from some of Australia’s most respected criminologists and historians. The book marries these two disciplines to offer a unique examination of crime and deviance over more than 200 years of Anglo-Australian history. This innovative compilation explores the intriguing ways in which Australian crime has evolved and the pioneering ways criminal justice agencies have dealt with offenders. The topics investigated range from colonial bushranging to terrorist attacks, along with emerging forms of criminal activity, such as cybercrime. The book also highlights the social construction of crime by using case studies, including the way that homosexual activity was policed in earlier times. The collection provides an engaging and thorough examination of the historical factors that have shaped crime and punishment and its contemporary context.



The Black Experience in America

The Black Experience in America Author Britannica Educational Publishing
ISBN-10 9781615301775
Release 2010-04-01
Pages 280
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The outlawing of desegregation and attainment of equal rights facilitated a new era of possibility throughout American society. This book details the historic deeds that redefined the American landscape since the 1940s, examining the explosion of creativity that ensued in the areas of literature, music, and sports as African Americans explore new opportunities and prospects.



The American Civil Rights Movement 1865 1950

The American Civil Rights Movement 1865   1950 Author Russell Brooker
ISBN-10 9780739179932
Release 2016-12-07
Pages 364
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The American Civil Rights Movement 1865–1950 is a history of the African American struggle for freedom and equality from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. It synthesizes the disparate black movements, explaining consistent themes and controversies during those years. The main focus is on the black activists who led the movement and the white people who supported them. The principal theme is that African American agency propelled the progress and that whites often helped. Even whites who were not sympathetic to black demands were useful, often because it was to their advantage to act as black allies. Even white opponents could be coerced into cooperation or, at least, non-opposition. White people of good will with shallow understanding were frustrating, but they were sometimes useful. Even if they did not work for black rights, they did not work against them, and sometimes helped because they had no better options. Until now, the history of the African American movement from 1865 to 1950 has not been covered as one coherent story. There have been many histories of African Americans that have treated the subject in one chapter or part of a chapter, and several excellent books have concentrated on a specific time period, such as Reconstruction or World War II. Other books have focused on one aspect of the time, such as lynching or the nature of Jim Crow. This is the first book to synthesize the history of the movement in a coherent whole.



This Is Not Dixie

This Is Not Dixie Author Brent M.S. Campney
ISBN-10 9780252097614
Release 2015-08-30
Pages 312
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Often defined as a mostly southern phenomenon, racist violence existed everywhere. Brent M. S. Campney explodes the notion of the Midwest as a so-called land of freedom with an in-depth study of assaults both active and threatened faced by African Americans in post–Civil War Kansas. Campney's capacious definition of white-on-black violence encompasses not only sensational demonstrations of white power like lynchings and race riots, but acts of threatened violence and the varied forms of pervasive routine violence--property damage, rape, forcible ejection from towns--used to intimidate African Americans. As he shows, such methods were a cornerstone of efforts to impose and maintain white supremacy. Yet Campney's broad consideration of racist violence also lends new insights into the ways people resisted threats. African Americans spontaneously hid fugitives and defused lynch mobs while also using newspapers and civil rights groups to lay the groundwork for forms of institutionalized opposition that could fight racist violence through the courts and via public opinion. Ambitious and provocative, This Is Not Dixie rewrites fundamental narratives on mob action, race relations, African American resistance, and racism's grim past in the heartland.



Censoring Racial Ridicule

Censoring Racial Ridicule Author M. Alison Kibler
ISBN-10 9781469618371
Release 2015-03-05
Pages 328
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A drunken Irish maid slips and falls. A greedy Jewish pawnbroker lures his female employee into prostitution. An African American man leers at a white woman. These and other, similar images appeared widely on stages and screens across America during the early twentieth century. In this provocative study, M. Alison Kibler uncovers, for the first time, powerful and concurrent campaigns by Irish, Jewish and African Americans against racial ridicule in popular culture at the turn of the twentieth century. Censoring Racial Ridicule explores how Irish, Jewish, and African American groups of the era resisted harmful representations in popular culture by lobbying behind the scenes, boycotting particular acts, and staging theater riots. Kibler demonstrates that these groups' tactics evolved and diverged over time, with some continuing to pursue street protest while others sought redress through new censorship laws. Exploring the relationship between free expression, democracy, and equality in America, Kibler shows that the Irish, Jewish, and African American campaigns against racial ridicule are at the roots of contemporary debates over hate speech.



Local Matters

Local Matters Author Christopher Waldrep
ISBN-10 9780820342054
Release 2011-12-01
Pages 264
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Much of the current reassessment of race, culture, and criminal justice in the nineteenth-century South has been based on intensive community studies. Drawing on previously untapped sources, the nine original papers collected here represent some of the best new work on how racial justice can be shaped by the particulars of time and place. Although each essay is anchored in the local, several important larger themes emerge across the volume--such as the importance of personality and place, the movement of former slaves from the capriciousness of "plantation justice" to the (theoretically) more evenhanded processes of the courts, and the increased presence of government in daily aspects of American life. Local Matters cites a wide range of examples to support these themes. One essay considers the case of a quasi-free slave in Natchez, Mississippi--himself a slaveowner--who was "reined in" by his master through the courts, while another shows how federal aims were subverted during trials held in the aftermath of the 1876 race riots in Ellenton, South Carolina. Other topics covered include the fear of black criminality as a motivation of Klan activity; the career of Thomas Ruffin, slaveowner and North Carolina Supreme Court Justice; blacks and the ballot in Washington County, Texas; the overturned murder conviction of a North Carolina slave who had killed a white man; the formation of a powerful white bloc in Vicksburg, Mississippi; agitation by black and white North Carolina women for greater protections from abusive white male elites; and slaves, crime, and the common law in New Orleans. Together, these studies offer new insights into the nature of law and the fate of due process at different stages of a highly racialized society.



Program of the Annual Meeting

Program of the     Annual Meeting Author American Historical Association
ISBN-10 UOM:39015081575683
Release 2009
Pages
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Program of the Annual Meeting has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Program of the Annual Meeting also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Program of the Annual Meeting book for free.



Library Journal

Library Journal Author
ISBN-10 UCSC:32106017981504
Release 2008
Pages
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Library Journal has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Library Journal also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Library Journal book for free.



Colored Travelers

Colored Travelers Author Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor
ISBN-10 9781469628585
Release 2016-10-13
Pages 240
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Americans have long regarded the freedom of travel a central tenet of citizenship. Yet, in the United States, freedom of movement has historically been a right reserved for whites. In this book, Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor shows that African Americans fought obstructions to their mobility over 100 years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus. These were "colored travelers," activists who relied on steamships, stagecoaches, and railroads to expand their networks and to fight slavery and racism. They refused to ride in "Jim Crow" railroad cars, fought for the right to hold a U.S. passport (and citizenship), and during their transatlantic voyages, demonstrated their radical abolitionism. By focusing on the myriad strategies of black protest, including the assertions of gendered freedom and citizenship, this book tells the story of how the basic act of traveling emerged as a front line in the battle for African American equal rights before the Civil War. Drawing on exhaustive research from U.S. and British newspapers, journals, narratives, and letters, as well as firsthand accounts of such figures as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and William Wells Brown, Pryor illustrates how, in the quest for citizenship, colored travelers constructed ideas about respectability and challenged racist ideologies that made black mobility a crime.



Race Riots and Resistance

Race Riots and Resistance Author Jan Voogd
ISBN-10 1433100673
Release 2008
Pages 234
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"Race Riots and Resistance" uncovers a long-hidden, tragic chapter of American history. Focusing on the -Red Summer- of 1919 in which black communities were targeted by white mobs, the book examines the contexts out of which white racial violence arose. It shows how the riots transcended any particularity of cause, and in doing so calls into question many longstanding beliefs about racial violence. The book goes on to portray the riots as a phenomenon, documenting the number of incidents, describing the events in detail, and analyzing the patterns that emerge from looking at the riots collectively. Finally and significantly, "Race Riots and Resistance" argues that the response to the riots marked an early stage of what came to be known as the Civil Rights Movement."



1919 The Year of Racial Violence

1919  The Year of Racial Violence Author David F. Krugler
ISBN-10 9781316195000
Release 2014-12-08
Pages
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1919, The Year of Racial Violence recounts African Americans' brave stand against a cascade of mob attacks in the United States after World War I. The emerging New Negro identity, which prized unflinching resistance to second-class citizenship, further inspired veterans and their fellow black citizens. In city after city - Washington, DC; Chicago; Charleston; and elsewhere - black men and women took up arms to repel mobs that used lynching, assaults, and other forms of violence to protect white supremacy; yet, authorities blamed blacks for the violence, leading to mass arrests and misleading news coverage. Refusing to yield, African Americans sought accuracy and fairness in the courts of public opinion and the law. This is the first account of this three-front fight - in the streets, in the press, and in the courts - against mob violence during one of the worst years of racial conflict in US history.



Jury Discrimination

Jury Discrimination Author Christopher Waldrep
ISBN-10 9780820340302
Release 2011-12-01
Pages 328
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In 1906 a white lawyer named Dabney Marshall argued a case before the Mississippi Supreme Court demanding the racial integration of juries. He carried out a plan devised by Mississippi's foremost black lawyer of the time: Willis Mollison. Against staggering odds, and with the help of a friendly newspaper editor, he won. How Marshall and his allies were able to force the court to overturn state law and precedent, if only for a brief period, at the behest of the U.S. Supreme Court is the subject of Jury Discrimination, a book that explores the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on America's civil rights history. Christopher Waldrep traces the origins of Americans' ideas about trial by jury and provides the first detailed analysis of jury discrimination. Southerners' determination to keep their juries entirely white played a crucial role in segregation, emboldening lynchers and vigilantes like the Ku Klux Klan. As the postbellum Congress articulated ideals of national citizenship in civil rights legislation, most importantly the Fourteenth Amendment, factions within the U.S. Supreme Court battled over how to read the amendment: expansively, protecting a variety of rights against a host of enemies, or narrowly, guarding only against rare violations by state governments. The latter view prevailed, entombing the amendment in a narrow interpretation that persists to this day. Although the high court clearly denounced the overt discrimination enacted by state legislatures, it set evidentiary rules that made discrimination by state officers and agents extremely difficult to prove. Had these rules been less onerous, Waldrep argues, countless black jurors could have been seated throughout the nation at precisely the moment when white legislators and jurists were making and enforcing segregation laws. Marshall and Mollison's success in breaking through Mississippi law to get blacks admitted to juries suggests that legal reasoning plausibly founded on constitutional principle, as articulated by the Supreme Court, could trump even the most stubbornly prejudiced public opinion.



The Many Faces of Judge Lynch

The Many Faces of Judge Lynch Author C. Waldrep
ISBN-10 9781403982711
Release 2002-11-08
Pages 265
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The U.S. is the most violent industrialized country in the world, and lynching - that is, murder endorsed by the community - may be a key to understanding America's heritage of violence and perhaps point to solutions that can eradicate it. While lynchings are predominantly racial in tone and motive, Christopher Waldrep's sweeping study of the meaning and uses of lynching from the colonial period to the present reveals that the definition of the term has shifted dramatically over time, and that the victims and perpetuators of lynching were as diverse as its many meanings. By examining lynching from a comparative and temporal perspective, Waldrep teaches us important lessons not only about racial violence in America, but about the ways in which communities define and justify crime and the punishment of its criminals.



The British National Bibliography

The British National Bibliography Author Arthur James Wells
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105211722678
Release 2009
Pages
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The British National Bibliography has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The British National Bibliography also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The British National Bibliography book for free.