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America in the World

America in the World Author Frank Costigliola
ISBN-10 9781107649545
Release 2013-12-23
Pages 384
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This volume includes historiographical surveys of American foreign relations since 1941 by some of the country's leading historians. Some of the essays offer sweeping overviews of the major trends in the field of foreign/international relations history. Others survey the literature on US relations with particular regions of the world or on the foreign policies of presidential administrations. The result is a comprehensive assessment of the historical literature on US foreign policy that highlights recent developments in the field.



America in the World

America in the World Author Frank Costigliola
ISBN-10 9781107001466
Release 2013-12-23
Pages 392
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This volume includes historiographical surveys of American foreign relations since 1941 by some of the country's leading historians. Some of the essays offer sweeping overviews of the major trends in the field of foreign/international relations history. Others survey the literature on US relations with particular regions of the world or on the foreign policies of presidential administrations. The result is a comprehensive assessment of the historical literature on US foreign policy that highlights recent developments in the field.



America in the World

America in the World Author Michael J. Hogan
ISBN-10 0521498074
Release 1995
Pages 619
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A survey of the historical literature on intelligence and national security during the Cold War.



Paths to Power

Paths to Power Author Michael J. Hogan
ISBN-10 0521664136
Release 2000
Pages 303
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Paths to Power reviews the literature on American diplomacy in the early Republic and in the age of Manifest Destiny, on American imperialism in the late nineteenth century and in the age of Roosevelt and Taft, on war and peace in the Wilsonian era, on foreign policy in the Republican ascendency of the 1920s, and on the origins of World War II in Europe and the Pacific. The result is a comprehensive assessment of the current literature that serves as a useful primer for students and scholars of American foreign relations.



Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations

Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations Author Frank Costigliola
ISBN-10 9781107054189
Release 2016-02-29
Pages 390
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This volume presents substantially revised and new essays on methodology and approaches in foreign and international relations history.



The Marshall Plan

The Marshall Plan Author Michael J. Hogan
ISBN-10 0521378400
Release 1989-01-27
Pages 482
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Analyzes the political and economic goals of the Marshall Plan discusses Britain's role in the plan, and assesses the outcome of U.S. aid and advice



A Companion to American Foreign Relations

A Companion to American Foreign Relations Author Robert Schulzinger
ISBN-10 9780470999035
Release 2008-04-15
Pages 578
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This is an authoritative volume of historiographical essays that survey the state of U.S. diplomatic history. The essays cover the entire range of the history of American foreign relations from the colonial period to the present. They discuss the major sources and analyze the most influential books and articles in the field. Includes discussions of new methodological approaches in diplomatic history.



United States Foreign Policy in the Interwar Period 1918 1941

United States Foreign Policy in the Interwar Period  1918 1941 Author Benjamin D. Rhodes
ISBN-10 0275948250
Release 2001
Pages 230
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This study presents an in-depth survey of the principal policies and personalities of American diplomacy of the era, together with a discussion of recent historiography in the field. For two decades between the two world wars, America pursued a foreign policy course that was, according to Rhodes, shortsighted and self-centered. Believing World War I had been an aberration, Americans na^Dively signed disarmament treaties and a pact renouncing war, while eschewing such inconveniences as enforcement machinery or participation in international organizations. Smug moral superiority, a penurious desire to save money, and naíveté ultimately led to the neglect of America's armed forces even as potential rivals were arming themselves to the teeth. In contrast to the dynamic drive of the New Deal in domestic policy, foreign policy under Franklin D. Roosevelt was often characterized by a lack of clarity and, reflecting Roosevelt's fear of isolationists and pacifists, by presidential explanations that were frequently evasive, incomplete, or deliberately misleading. One of the period's few successes was the bipartisan Good Neighbor policy, which proved far-sighted commercially and strategically. Rhodes praises Cordell Hull as the outstanding secretary of state of the time, whose judgment was often more on target than others in the State Department and the executive branch.



France and the United States

France and the United States Author Frank Costigliola
ISBN-10 UOM:39015021583979
Release 1992
Pages 316
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France, more than any other Western ally, has consistently tried to maintain its autonomy from U.S. foreign policy by insisting on a distinctively French global view and agenda. Whether interpreted as proud independence or petty intransigence, such French assertiveness has often embittered relations between the two nations and has sparked exasperation and resentment on both sides. In France and the United States: the Cold Alliance since World War II, Frank Costigliola examines the cultural and psychological aspects of postwar relations between the United States and its oldest ally and demonstrates the way in which these less tangible factors have colored the strategic, political, and economic ties between the two nations. This is the first major study of the two countries to look closely at the language of their diplomatic and cultural relations, and in particular at the ways in which gendered metaphors and allusions subtly affect attitudes and policies. The author also breaks new ground by considering how the end of the Cold War, the unification of Germany, the Persian Gulf War, the changing role of NATO, and the rise of the European Community have affected U.S. relations with France and with Western Europe as a whole. This timely and lively account sheds light on the political and personal clashes that de Gaulle had with Roosevelt and Johnson and that Mitterrand has had with Reagan and Bush. The author integrates into his political analysis the fascinating stories of the contested introduction into France of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Hollywood films, and Euro Disneyland; the controversial adoption of French theories by some American intellectuals, the quarrel over AIDS, and the building of the I. M. Pei Pyramid at the Louvre. Costigliola's richly detailed account will be an important text for scholars and students of the postwar histories of the United States, France, and Western Europe.



President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War 1941

President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War  1941 Author Charles Beard
ISBN-10 9781351496902
Release 2017-09-29
Pages 614
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Conceived by Charles Beard as a sequel to his provocative study of American Foreign Policy in the Making, 1932-1940, President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War outraged a nation, permanently damaging Beard's status as America's most influential historian.Beard's main argument is that both Democratic and Republican leaders, but Roosevelt above all, worked quietly in 1940 and 1941 to insinuate the United States into the Second World War. Basing his work on available congressional records and administrative reports, Beard concludes that FDR's image as a neutral, peace-loving leader was a smokescreen, behind which he planned for war against Germany and Japan even well before the attack on Pearl Harbor.Beard contends that the distinction between aiding allies in Europe like Great Britain and maintaining strict neutrality with respect to nations like Germany and Japan was untenable. Beard does not argue that all nations were alike, or that some did and others did not merit American support, but rather that Roosevelt chose to aid Great Britain secretly and unconstitutionally rather than making the case to the American public. President Roosevelt shifted from a policy of neutrality to one of armed intervention, but he did so without surrendering the appearance, the fiction of neutrality. This core argument makes the work no less explosive in 2003 than it was when first issued in 1948.



The Afterlife of John Fitzgerald Kennedy

The Afterlife of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Author Michael J. Hogan
ISBN-10 9781107186996
Release 2017-03-03
Pages 320
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In his new book, Michael J. Hogan, a leading historian of the American presidency, offers a new perspective on John Fitzgerald Kennedy, as seen not from his life and times but from his afterlife in American memory. The Afterlife of John Fitzgerald Kennedy considers how Kennedy constructed a popular image of himself, in effect, a brand, as he played the part of president on the White House stage. The cultural trauma brought on by his assassination further burnished that image and began the process of transporting Kennedy from history to memory. Hogan shows how Jacqueline Kennedy, as the chief guardian of her husband's memory, devoted herself to embedding the image of the slain president in the collective memory of the nation, evident in the many physical and literary monuments dedicated to his memory. Regardless of critics, most Americans continue to see Kennedy as his wife wanted him remembered: the charming war hero, the loving husband and father, and the peacemaker and progressive leader who inspired confidence and hope in the American people.



The Tragedy of American Diplomacy

The Tragedy of American Diplomacy Author William Appleman Williams
ISBN-10 0393304930
Release 1988
Pages 334
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In this pioneering book, "the man who has really put the counter-tradition together in its modern form" () examines the profound contradictions between America's ideals and its uses of its vast power, from the Open Door Notes of 1898 to the Bay of Pigs and the Vietnam War.



Legalist Empire

Legalist Empire Author Benjamin Allen Coates
ISBN-10 9780190495954
Release 2016-06-21
Pages 296
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After 1898 the United States not only solidified its position as an economic colossus, but by annexing Puerto Rico and the Philippines it had also added for the first time semi-permanent, heavily populated colonies unlikely ever to attain statehood. In short order followed a formal protectorate over Cuba, the "taking" of Panama to build a canal, and the announcement of a new Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, proclaiming an American duty to "police" the hemisphere. Empire had been an American practice since the nation's founding, but the new policies were understood as departures from traditional methods of territorial expansion. How to match these actions with traditional non-entanglement constituted the central preoccupation of U.S. foreign relations in the early twentieth century. International lawyers proposed instead that the United States become an impartial judge. By becoming a force for law in the world, America could reconcile its republican ideological tradition with a desire to rank with the Great Powers. Lawyers' message scaled new heights of popularity in the first decade and a half of the twentieth century as a true profession of international law emerged. The American Society of International Law (ASIL) and other groups, backed by the wealth of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, held annual meetings and published journals. They called for the creation of an international court, the holding of regular conferences to codify the rules of law, and the education of public opinion as to the proper rights and duties of states. To an extent unmatched before or since, the U.S. government-the executive branch if not always the U.S. Senate-embraced this project. Washington called for peace conferences and pushed for the creation of a "true" international court. It proposed legal institutions to preserve order in its hemisphere. Meanwhile lawyers advised presidents and made policy. The ASIL counted among its first members every living secretary of state (but one) who held office between 1892 and 1920. Growing numbers of international lawyers populated the State Department and represented U.S. corporations with business overseas. International lawyers were not isolated idealists operating from the sidelines. Well-connected, well-respected, and well-compensated, they formed an integral part of the foreign policy establishment that built and policed an expanding empire.



Yalta 1945

Yalta 1945 Author Fraser J. Harbutt
ISBN-10 9780521856775
Release 2010-02-15
Pages 438
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This revisionist study of Allied diplomacy from 1941 to 1946 challenges Americocentric views of the period and highlights Europe's neglected role. Fraser J. Harbutt, drawing on international sources, shows that in planning for the future Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and others self-consciously operated into 1945, not on "East/West" lines but within a "Europe/America" political framework characterized by the plausible prospect of Anglo-Russian collaboration and persisting American detachment. Harbutt then explains the destabilizing transformation around the time of the pivotal Yalta conference of February 1945, when a sudden series of provocative initiatives, manipulations, and miscues interacted with events to produce the breakdown of European solidarity and the Anglo-Soviet nexus, an evolving Anglo-American alignment, and new tensions that led finally to the Cold War. This fresh perspective, stressing structural, geopolitical, and traditional impulses and constraints, raises important new questions about the enduringly controversial transition from World War II to a cold war that no statesman wanted.



Antisemitism in America

Antisemitism in America Author Leonard Dinnerstein
ISBN-10 9780195313543
Release 1995-11-02
Pages 369
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Is antisemitism on the rise in America? Did the "hymietown" comment by Jesse Jackson and the Crown Heights riot signal a resurgence of antisemitism among blacks? The surprising answer to both questions, according to Leonard Dinnerstein, is no--Jews have never been more at home in America. But what we are seeing today, he writes, are the well-publicized results of a long tradition of prejudice, suspicion, and hatred against Jews--the direct product of the Christian teachings underlying so much of America's national heritage. In Antisemitism in America, Leonard Dinnerstein provides a landmark work--the first comprehensive history of prejudice against Jews in the United States, from colonial times to the present. His richly documented book traces American antisemitism from its roots in the dawn of the Christian era and arrival of the first European settlers, to its peak during World War II and its present day permutations--with separate chapters on antisemititsm in the South and among African-Americans, showing that prejudice among both whites and blacks flowed from the same stream of Southern evangelical Christianity. He shows, for example, that non-Christians were excluded from voting (in Rhode Island until 1842, North Carolina until 1868, and in New Hampshire until 1877), and demonstrates how the Civil War brought a new wave of antisemitism as both sides assumed that Jews supported with the enemy. We see how the decades that followed marked the emergence of a full-fledged antisemitic society, as Christian Americans excluded Jews from their social circles, and how antisemetic fervor climbed higher after the turn of the century, accelerated by eugenicists, fear of Bolshevism, the publications of Henry Ford, and the Depression. Dinnerstein goes on to explain that just before our entry into World War II, antisemitism reached a climax, as Father Coughlin attacked Jews over the airwaves (with the support of much of the Catholic clergy) and Charles Lindbergh delivered an openly antisemitic speech to an isolationist meeting. After the war, Dinnerstein tells us, with fresh economic opportunities and increased activities by civil rights advocates, antisemititsm went into sharp decline--though it frequently appeared in shockingly high places, including statements by Nixon and his Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "It must also be emphasized," Dinnerstein writes, "that in no Christian country has antisemitism been weaker than it has been in the United States," with its traditions of tolerance, diversity, and a secular national government. This book, however, reveals in disturbing detail the resilience, and vehemence, of this ugly prejudice. Penetrating, authoritative, and frequently alarming, this is the definitive account of a plague that refuses to go away.



Winning the Peace

Winning the Peace Author John Gerard Ruggie
ISBN-10 0231104278
Release 1998-01
Pages 288
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-- Foreign Affairs



The Holocaust in American Life

The Holocaust in American Life Author Peter Novick
ISBN-10 0547349610
Release 2000-09-20
Pages 384
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Prize-winning historian Peter Novick illuminates the reasons Americans ignored the Holocaust for so long -- how dwelling on German crimes interfered with Cold War mobilization; how American Jews, not wanting to be thought of as victims, avoided the subject. He explores in absorbing detail the decisions that later moved the Holocaust to the center of American life: Jewish leaders invoking its memory to muster support for Israel and to come out on top in a sordid competition over what group had suffered most; politicians using it to score points with Jewish voters. With insight and sensitivity, Novick raises searching questions about these developments. Have American Jews, by making the Holocaust the emblematic Jewish experience, given Hitler a posthumous victory, tacitly endorsing his definition of Jews as despised pariahs? Does the Holocaust really teach useful lessons and sensitize us to atrocities, or, by making the Holocaust the measure, does it make lesser crimes seem "not so bad"? What are we to make of the fact that while Americans spend hundreds of millions of dollars for museums recording a European crime, there is no museum of American slavery?