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Building the International Criminal Court

Building the International Criminal Court Author Benjamin N. Schiff
ISBN-10 9781139470193
Release 2008-05-05
Pages
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The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first and only standing international court capable of prosecuting humanity's worst crimes: genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. It faces huge obstacles. It has no police force; it pursues investigations in areas of tremendous turmoil, conflict, and death; it is charged both with trying suspects and with aiding their victims; and it seeks to combine divergent legal traditions in an entirely new international legal mechanism. International law advocates sought to establish a standing international criminal court for more than 150 years. Other, temporary, single-purpose criminal tribunals, truth commissions, and special courts have come and gone, but the ICC is the only permanent inheritor of the Nuremberg legacy. In Building the International Criminal Court, Oberlin College Professor of Politics Ben Schiff analyzes the International Criminal Court, melding historical perspective, international relations theories, and observers' insights to explain the Court's origins, creation, innovations, dynamics, and operational challenges.



Justice in Conflict

Justice in Conflict Author Mark Kersten
ISBN-10 9780191082948
Release 2016-08-04
Pages 280
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What happens when the international community simultaneously pursues peace and justice in response to ongoing conflicts? What are the effects of interventions by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the wars in which the institution intervenes? Is holding perpetrators of mass atrocities accountable a help or hindrance to conflict resolution? This book offers an in-depth examination of the effects of interventions by the ICC on peace, justice and conflict processes. The 'peace versus justice' debate, wherein it is argued that the ICC has either positive or negative effects on 'peace', has spawned in response to the Court's propensity to intervene in conflicts as they still rage. This book is a response to, and a critical engagement with, this debate. Building on theoretical and analytical insights from the fields of conflict and peace studies, conflict resolution, and negotiation theory, the book develops a novel analytical framework to study the Court's effects on peace, justice, and conflict processes. This framework is applied to two cases: Libya and northern Uganda. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, the core of the book examines the empirical effects of the ICC on each case. The book also examines why the ICC has the effects that it does, delineating the relationship between the interests of states that refer situations to the Court and the ICC's institutional interests, arguing that the negotiation of these interests determines which side of a conflict the ICC targets and thus its effects on peace, justice, and conflict processes. While the effects of the ICC's interventions are ultimately and inevitably mixed, the book makes a unique contribution to the empirical record on ICC interventions and presents a novel and sophisticated means of studying, analyzing, and understanding the effects of the Court's interventions in Libya, northern Uganda - and beyond.



The Politics of Constructing the International Criminal Court

The Politics of Constructing the International Criminal Court Author M. Struett
ISBN-10 9780230612419
Release 2008-05-12
Pages 223
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This book examines the political process that led to the establishment of the International Criminal Court in 2002. It accounts for the main features of the court, including its strong, independent prosecutor, by analyzing the discourse surrounding the ICC negotiations, and particularly highlights the role of human rights NGOs.



The International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court Author Marlies Glasius
ISBN-10 0415333954
Release 2006
Pages 158
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A new examination of the International Criminal Court (ICC) from a political science and international relations perspective. It describes the main features of the court and discusses the political negotiations and the on-going clashes between those states who oppose the court, particularly the United States, and those who defend it. It also makes these issues accessible to non-lawyers and presents effective advocacy strategies for non-governmental organizations. It also delivers essential background to the place of the US in international relations and makes a major contribution to thinking about the ICC's future. While global civil society does not deliver global democracy, it does contribute to more transparent, more deliberative and more ethical international decision-making which is ultimately preferable to a world of isolated sovereign states with no accountability outside their borders, or exclusive and secretive state-to-state diplomacy. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of international relations, international law, globalization and global governance.



The International Criminal Court in Search of its Purpose and Identity

The International Criminal Court in Search of its Purpose and Identity Author Triestino Mariniello
ISBN-10 9781317703099
Release 2014-11-27
Pages 288
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The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent international criminal tribunal, which has jurisdiction over the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crime of aggression. This book critically analyses the law and practice of the ICC and its contribution to the development of international criminal law and policy. The book focuses on the key procedural and substantive challenges faced by the ICC since its establishment. The critical analysis of the normative framework aims to elaborate ways in which the Court may resolve difficulties, which prevent it from reaching its declared objectives in particularly complex situations. Contributors to the book include leading experts in international criminal justice, and cover a range of topics including, inter alia, terrorism, modes of liability, ne bis in idem, victims reparations, the evidentiary threshold for the confirmation of charges, and sentencing. The book also considers the relationship between the ICC and States, and explores the impact that the new regime of international criminal justice has had on countries where the most serious crimes have been committed. In drawing together these discussions, the book provides a significant contribution in assessing how the ICC’s practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book will be of great use and interest to international criminal law and public international law.



Justice for Victims before the International Criminal Court

Justice for Victims before the International Criminal Court Author Luke Moffett
ISBN-10 9781317910824
Release 2014-06-27
Pages 308
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Many prosecutors and commentators have praised the victim provisions at the International Criminal Court (ICC) as 'justice for victims', which for the first time include participation, protection and reparations. This book critically examines the role of victims in international criminal justice, drawing from human rights, victimology, and best practices in transitional justice. Drawing on field research in Northern Uganda, Luke Moffet explores the nature of international crimes and assesses the role of victims in the proceedings of the ICC, paying particular attention to their recognition, participation, reparations and protection. The book argues that because of the criminal nature and structural limitations of the ICC, justice for victims is symbolic, requiring State Parties to complement the work of the Court to address victims' needs. In advancing an innovative theory of justice for victims, and in offering solutions to current challenges, the book will be of great interest and use to academics, practitioners and students engaged in victimology, the ICC, transitional justice, or reparations.



The International Criminal Court and Peace Processes in Africa

The International Criminal Court and Peace Processes in Africa Author Line Gissel
ISBN-10 9781351591898
Release 2018-01-19
Pages 210
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The book investigates how involvement by the International Criminal Court (ICC) affects efforts to negotiate peace. It offers an interpretive account of how peace negotiators and mediators in two peace processes in Uganda and Kenya sought to navigate and understand the new terrain of international justice, while also tracing how and why international decision-making processes interfered with the negotiations, narrated the conflicts and insisted on a narrow scope of justice. Building on this interpretive analysis, a comparative analysis of peace processes in Uganda, Kenya and Colombia explores a set of general features pertaining to the judicialisation of peace. Line Engbo Gissel argues that the level and timing of ICC involvement is key to the ICC’s impact on peace processes and explains why this is the case: a high level of ICC involvement during the negotiation phase of a peace process delegates politico-legal and discursive authority away from peace process actors, while a low level of ICC involvement during the negotiation phase retains such forms of authority at the level of the peace process. As politico-legal authority enables the resolution of sticking points and discursive authority constructs the conflict and its resolution, the location of authority is important for the peace process. Furthermore, judicialisation also affects the negotiation and implementation of a justice policy, with a narrowing scope for justice accompanying increasing levels of ICC involvement.



The UN International Criminal Tribunals

The UN International Criminal Tribunals Author William A. Schabas
ISBN-10 9781139456814
Release 2006-07-20
Pages 711
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This book is a guide to the law that applies in the three international criminal tribunals, for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, set up by the UN during the period 1993 to 2002 to deal with atrocities and human rights abuses committed during conflict in those countries. Building on the work of an earlier generation of war crimes courts, these tribunals have developed a sophisticated body of law concerning the elements of the three international crimes (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes), and forms of participation in such crimes, as well as other general principles of international criminal law, procedural matters and sentencing. The legacy of the tribunals will be indispensable as international law moves into a more advanced stage, with the establishment of the International Criminal Court. Their judicial decisions are examined here, as well as the drafting history of their statutes and other contemporary sources.



Rough Justice

Rough Justice Author David Bosco
ISBN-10 9780199844142
Release 2013-12-17
Pages 312
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Ten years ago, in the wake of massive crimes in central Africa and the Balkans, the first permanent international criminal court was established in The Hague despite resistance from some of the world's most powerful states. In the past decade, the court has grown from a few staff in an empty building to a bustling institution with more than a thousand lawyers, investigators, and administrators from around the world. Despite its growth and the backing of more than 120 nations, the ICC is still struggling to assert itself in often turbulent political crises. The ICC is generally autonomous in its ability to select cases and investigate crimes, but it is ultimately dependent on sovereign states, and particularly on the world's leading powers. These states can provide the diplomatic, economic, and military clout the court often needs to get cooperation-and to arrest suspects. But states don't expend precious political capital lightly, and the court has often struggled to get the help it needs. When their interests are most affected, moreover, powerful states usually want the court to keep its distance. Directly and indirectly, they make their preferences known in The Hague. Rough Justice grapples with the court's basic dilemma: designed to be apolitical, it requires the support of politicians who pursue national interests and answer to domestic audiences. Through a sharp analysis of the dynamics at work behind the scenes, Bosco assesses the ways in which powerful states have shaped the court's effort to transform the vision of international justice into reality. This will be the definitive account of the Court and its uneven progress toward advancing accountability around the world.



Rules Politics and the International Criminal Court

Rules  Politics  and the International Criminal Court Author Yvonne Dutton
ISBN-10 9781134124398
Release 2013-08-21
Pages 216
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In this new work, Dutton examines the ICC and whether and how its enforcement mechanism influences state membership and the court’s ability to realize treaty goals, examining questions such as: Why did states decide to create the ICC and design the institution with this uniquely strong enforcement mechanism? Will the ICC’s enforcement mechanism be sufficient to hold states accountable to their commitment so that the ICC can realize its goal of ending impunity for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes? Will states view the ICC’s enforcement mechanism as a credible threat and refuse to join unless they already have good domestic human rights practices and institutions that are independent and capable of prosecuting human rights abuses? If states that most need to improve their domestic legal practices as relates to protecting against human rights abuses do not join the court, is there any hope that the threat of punishment by the ICC can play a role in bettering state’s human rights practices and deterring individuals from committing mass atrocities? This work provides a significant contribution to the field, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of international law, international relations, international organizations and human rights.



The International Criminal Court in an Effective Global Justice System

The International Criminal Court in an Effective Global Justice System Author Linda E. Carter
ISBN-10 9781784719821
Release 2016-11-25
Pages 384
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International tribunals need to interface effectively with national jurisdictions, which includes coordination with domestic judicial prosecutions as well as an appreciation for other non-judicial types of transitional justice. In this book, the authors analyze the earlier international tribunals established since the 1990s and the parallel national proceedings for each. In examining the ways in which the ICC can best coordinate with national processes this book considers the ICC’s present interactions with national jurisdictions and the statutory framework of the Rome Statute for interface with national jurisdictions.



The International Criminal Court and National Courts

The International Criminal Court and National Courts Author Nidal Nabil Jurdi
ISBN-10 9781317027300
Release 2016-03-03
Pages 332
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This book analyzes the position of the ICC in relation to national court systems. The research illustrates that what seemed to be a straight forward relationship between the ICC and national courts under the complementarity mechanism, proves to be much more complex in practice. Using the referrals of Uganda and Darfur, the book demonstrates ways in which it might be possible to prosecute for crimes currently not prosecuted by the ICC and brings to light possible solutions to overcome the gaps in law and practice in the jurisdictional relation between the ICC and national systems. It will be of value to academics, students and policy-makers working in the area of international law, international organizations, and human rights.



The Legitimacy of International Criminal Tribunals

The Legitimacy of International Criminal Tribunals Author Nobuo Hayashi
ISBN-10 9781316943151
Release 2017-01-19
Pages
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With the ad hoc tribunals completing their mandates and the International Criminal Court under significant pressure, today's international criminal jurisdictions are at a critical juncture. Their legitimacy cannot be taken for granted. This multidisciplinary volume investigates key issues pertaining to legitimacy: criminal accountability, normative development, truth-discovery, complementarity, regionalism, and judicial cooperation. The volume sheds new light on previously unexplored areas, including the significance of redacted judgements, prosecutors' opening statements, rehabilitative processes of international convicts, victim expectations, court financing, and NGO activism. The book's original contributions will appeal to researchers, practitioners, advocates, and students of international criminal justice, accountability for war crimes and the rule of law.



Law War and Crime

Law  War and Crime Author Gerry J. Simpson
ISBN-10 9780745657318
Release 2013-04-18
Pages 240
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From events at Nuremberg and Tokyo after World War II, to the recent trials of Slobodan Milošević and Saddam Hussein, war crimes trials are an increasingly pervasive feature of the aftermath of conflict. In his new book, Law, War and Crime, Gerry Simpson explores the meaning and effect of such trials, and places them in their broader political and cultural contexts. The book traces the development of the war crimes field from its origins in the outlawing of piracy to its contemporary manifestation in the establishment of the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Simpson argues that the field of war crimes is constituted by a number of tensions between, for example, politics and law, local justice and cosmopolitan reckoning, collective guilt and individual responsibility, and between the instinct that war, at worst, is an error and the conviction that war is a crime. Written in the wake of an extraordinary period in the life of the law, the book asks a number of critical questions. What does it mean to talk about war in the language of the criminal law? What are the consequences of seeking to criminalise the conduct of one's enemies? How did this relatively new phenomenon of putting on trial perpetrators of mass atrocity and defeated enemies come into existence? This book seeks to answer these important questions whilst shedding new light on the complex relationship between law, war and crime.



Fictions of Justice

Fictions of Justice Author Kamari Maxine Clarke
ISBN-10 9780521889100
Release 2009-05-25
Pages 322
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This book explores how notions of justice are negotiated through everyday micropractices and grassroots contestations of those practices.



The International Criminal Court as a Tool for Peace Building

The International Criminal Court as a Tool for Peace Building Author Elizabeth Stubbins
ISBN-10 OCLC:62564502
Release 2004
Pages 172
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The International Criminal Court as a Tool for Peace Building has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The International Criminal Court as a Tool for Peace Building also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The International Criminal Court as a Tool for Peace Building book for free.



The International Criminal Court and National Jurisdictions

The International Criminal Court and National Jurisdictions Author Federica Gioia
ISBN-10 9781351887564
Release 2016-12-05
Pages 192
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At a stage in its development when the workings of the International Criminal Court may be assessed, this timely volume provides valuable insights into its activities and, in particular, its interaction with national jurisdictions and international organizations. The contributors discuss a broad range of topics and present a 'first assessment' of complementarity. They address the issues at the heart of the substantive and procedural law of the Court and examine aspects relating to national implementation and international cooperation. These proceedings are the latest addition to the Trento Conference series, bringing together a wide range of leading scholars, diplomats and representatives of international organizations. As such, they provide an important contribution to the ongoing debate surrounding International Criminal Law and the International Criminal Court in particular. This thought-provoking study will be of value to researchers and policy makers alike.