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Common Sense and a Little Fire Second Edition

Common Sense and a Little Fire  Second Edition Author Annelise Orleck
ISBN-10 9781469635927
Release 2017-10-17
Pages 424
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Over twenty years after its initial publication, Annelise Orleck's Common Sense and a Little Fire continues to resonate with its harrowing story of activism, labor, and women's history. Orleck traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely made more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe to the radical ferment of New York's Lower East Side and the gaslit tenements where young workers studied together. Orleck paints a compelling picture of housewives' food and rent protests, of grim conditions in the garment shops, of factory-floor friendships that laid the basis for a mass uprising of young women garment workers, and of the impassioned rallies working women organized for suffrage. Featuring a new preface by the author, this new edition reasserts itself as a pivotal text in twentieth-century labor history.



Common Sense and a Little Fire

Common Sense and a Little Fire Author Annelise Orleck
ISBN-10 9780807863718
Release 2000-11-09
Pages 400
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Common Sense and a Little Fire traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely had more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe to the radical ferment of New York's Lower East Side and the gaslit tenements where young workers studied together. Drawing from the women's writings and speeches, she paints a compelling picture of housewives' food and rent protests, of grim conditions in the garment shops, of factory-floor friendships that laid the basis for a mass uprising of young women garment workers, and of the impassioned rallies working women organized for suffrage. From that era of rebellion, Orleck charts the rise of a distinctly working-class feminism that fueled poor women's activism and shaped government labor, tenant, and consumer policies through the early 1950s.



Common Sense a Little Fire

Common Sense   a Little Fire Author Annelise Orleck
ISBN-10 0807845116
Release 1995
Pages 384
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Common Sense and a Little Fire traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely had more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women's movement. Orleck takes her four subjects from turbulent, turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe to the radical ferment of New York's Lower East Side and the gaslit tenements where young workers studied together. Drawing from the women's writings and speeches, she paints a compelling picture of housewives' food and rent protests, of grim conditions in the garment shops, of factory-floor friendships that laid the basis for a mass uprising of young women garment workers, and of the impassioned rallies working women organized for suffrage. From that era of rebellion, Orleck charts the rise of a distinctly working-class feminism that fueled poor women's activism and shaped government labor, tenant, and consumer policies through the early 1950s.



Gendering Labor History

Gendering Labor History Author Alice Kessler-Harris
ISBN-10 9780252073939
Release 2007
Pages 374
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The role of gender in the history of the working class world



Angels in the Machinery

Angels in the Machinery Author Rebecca Edwards
ISBN-10 9780190283506
Release 1997-11-27
Pages 256
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Angels in the Machinery offers a sweeping analysis of the centrality of gender to politics in the United States from the days of the Whigs to the early twentieth century. Author Rebecca Edwards shows that women in the U.S. participated actively and influentially as Republicans, Democrats, and leaders of third-party movements like Prohibitionism and Populism--decades before they won the right to vote--and in the process managed to transform forever the ideology of American party politics. Using cartoons, speeches, party platforms, news accounts, and campaign memorabilia, she offers a compelling explanation of why family values, women's political activities, and even candidates' sex lives remain hot-button issues in politics to this day.



Gender and Anthropology

Gender and Anthropology Author Frances E. Mascia-Lees
ISBN-10 9781478634812
Release 2016-11-11
Pages 136
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As an early reviewer wrote, “This is one of the clearest, most concise statements on social theory in general, let alone on gender, that I have ever read.” Now updated, Mascia-Lees and Black continue to expertly trace how anthropologists have used different theoretical orientations to examine the nature and determinants of gender roles and gender inequality. From the nineteenth century on, anthropologists have used different theoretical orientations to understand the emotionally charged topic of gender. With an insightful look at evolutionary, materialist, psychological, structuralist, poststructural, sociolinguistic, and self-reflexive approaches, this distinctive module also examines how these approaches best explain gender and sexual oppression in a global world. The authors pack great amounts of valuable information into such a slim volume yet leave readers with digestible material that does more than cover the surface of anthropological perspectives on gender roles and stratification. Readers gain insights and tools to develop their own critical analyses of gender.



Mobilizing New York

Mobilizing New York Author Tamar W. Carroll
ISBN-10 9781469619897
Release 2015-04-20
Pages 304
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Examining three interconnected case studies, Tamar Carroll powerfully demonstrates the ability of grassroots community activism to bridge racial and cultural differences and effect social change. Drawing on a rich array of oral histories, archival records, newspapers, films, and photographs from post–World War II New York City, Carroll shows how poor people transformed the antipoverty organization Mobilization for Youth and shaped the subsequent War on Poverty. Highlighting the little-known National Congress of Neighborhood Women, she reveals the significant participation of working-class white ethnic women and women of color in New York City's feminist activism. Finally, Carroll traces the partnership between the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) and Women's Health Action Mobilization (WHAM!), showing how gay men and feminists collaborated to create a supportive community for those affected by the AIDS epidemic, to improve health care, and to oppose homophobia and misogyny during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. Carroll contends that social policies that encourage the political mobilization of marginalized groups and foster coalitions across identity differences are the most effective means of solving social problems and realizing democracy.



Two Paths to Equality

Two Paths to Equality Author Amy E. Butler
ISBN-10 9780791488874
Release 2012-02-01
Pages 177
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A comprehensive look at the ERA debates of the 1920s.



Workingmen s Democracy

Workingmen s Democracy Author Leon Fink
ISBN-10 0252012569
Release 1983
Pages 249
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Workingmen s Democracy has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Workingmen s Democracy also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Workingmen s Democracy book for free.



Inside Organized Racism

Inside Organized Racism Author Kathleen M. Blee
ISBN-10 052093072X
Release 2003-07-09
Pages 272
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Following up her highly praised study of the women in the 1920s Ku Klux Klan, Blee discovers that many of today's racist women combine dangerous racist and anti-Semitic agendas with otherwise mainstream lives. The only national sample of a broad spectrum of racist activists and the only major work on women racists, this important book also sheds light on how gender relationships shape participation in the movement as a whole.



A World Full of Women

A World Full of Women Author Martha C. Ward
ISBN-10 9781317342472
Release 2015-10-14
Pages 288
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Takes a cross-cultural approach to the study of women A World Full of Women, 6/e, combines descriptive ethnography, gender theory, and international statistics to present a comprehensive picture of the lives of women. Readers will better comprehend and contextualize women’s issues and experiences in today’s world. This title explores the diversity of women’s lives from class to culture, with examples ranging from women’s work to marriage patterns, health issues, violence against women, and grassroots organizing.



Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine

Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine Author Rachel Schreiber
ISBN-10 9781351565998
Release 2017-07-05
Pages 194
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Interweaving nuanced discussions of politics, visuality, and gender, Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine uncovers the complex ways that gender figures into the graphic satire created by artists for the New York City-based socialist journal, the Masses. This exceptional magazine was published between 1911 and 1917, during an unusually radical decade in American history, and featured cartoons drawn by artists of the Ashcan School and others, addressing questions of politics, gender, labor and class. Rather than viewing art from the Masses primarily in terms of its critical social stances or aesthetic choices, however, this study uses these images to open up new ways of understanding the complexity of early 20th-century viewpoints. By focusing on the activist images found in the Masses and studying their unique perspective on American modernity, Rachel Schreiber also returns these often-ignored images to their rightful place in the scholarship on American modernism. This book demonstrates that the centrality of the Masses artists' commitments to gender and class equality is itself a characterization of the importance of these issues for American moderns. Despite their alarmingly regular reliance on gender stereotypes?and regardless of any assessment of the efficacy of the artists' activism?the graphic satire of the Masses offers invaluable insights into the workings of gender and the role of images in activist practices at the beginning of the last century.



New Working class Studies

New Working class Studies Author John Russo
ISBN-10 0801489679
Release 2005
Pages 276
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This book brings together historians, economists, geographers, sociologists, and scholars of literature and cultural studies to explore the emerging discipline of working-class studies and identify its key themes and issues.



The Other Women s Movement

The Other Women s Movement Author Dorothy Sue Cobble
ISBN-10 9781400840861
Release 2011-08-15
Pages 336
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American feminism has always been about more than the struggle for individual rights and equal treatment with men. There's also a vital and continuing tradition of women's reform that sought social as well as individual rights and argued for the dismantling of the masculine standard. In this much anticipated book, Dorothy Sue Cobble retrieves the forgotten feminism of the previous generations of working women, illuminating the ideas that inspired them and the reforms they secured from employers and the state. This socially and ethnically diverse movement for change emerged first from union halls and factory floors and spread to the "pink collar" domain of telephone operators, secretaries, and airline hostesses. From the 1930s to the 1980s, these women pursued answers to problems that are increasingly pressing today: how to balance work and family and how to address the growing economic inequalities that confront us. The Other Women's Movement traces their impact from the 1940s into the feminist movement of the present. The labor reformers whose stories are told in The Other Women's Movement wanted equality and "special benefits," and they did not see the two as incompatible. They argued that gender differences must be accommodated and that "equality" could not always be achieved by applying an identical standard of treatment to men and women. The reform agenda they championed--an end to unfair sex discrimination, just compensation for their waged labor, and the right to care for their families and communities--launched a revolution in employment practices that carries on today. Unique in its range and perspective, this is the first book to link the continuous tradition of social feminism to the leadership of labor women within that movement.



White Mother to a Dark Race

White Mother to a Dark Race Author Margaret D. Jacobs
ISBN-10 9780803211001
Release 2009-07
Pages 557
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In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, indigenous communities in the United States and Australia suffered a common experience at the hands of state authorities: the removal of their children to institutions in the name of assimilating American Indians and protecting Aboriginal people. Although officially characterized as benevolent, these government policies often inflicted great trauma on indigenous families and ultimately served the settler nations? larger goals of consolidating control over indigenous peoples and their lands. White Mother to a Dark Racetakes the study of indigenous education and acculturation in new directions in its examination of the key roles white women played in these policies of indigenous child-removal. Government officials, missionaries, and reformers justified the removal of indigenous children in particularly gendered ways by focusing on the supposed deficiencies of indigenous mothers, the alleged barbarity of indigenous men, and the lack of a patriarchal nuclear family. Often they deemed white women the most appropriate agents to carry out these child-removal policies. Inspired by the maternalist movement of the era, many white women were eager to serve as surrogate mothers to indigenous children and maneuvered to influence public policy affecting indigenous people. Although some white women developed caring relationships with indigenous children and others became critical of government policies, many became hopelessly ensnared in this insidious colonial policy.



The Politics of Motherhood

The Politics of Motherhood Author Alexis Jetter
ISBN-10 087451780X
Release 1997-01-01
Pages 386
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Perhaps the most deeply rooted stereotype of motherhood, editor Annelise Orleck writes, is "the notion that mothers are by definition apolitical, isolated with their children in a world of pure emotion, far removed from the welter of politics and social struggle." This collection of essays, interviews, and personal narratives challenges the image of a mutually absorbed madonna and child and explodes the myth that bearing and raising children alters a woman's consciousness in some fundamentally conservative way, silencing her voice and disarming her rebellion. Instead, these contributors demonstrate that motherhood often redefines and revitalizes a woman's political consciousness. From Love Canal to the Kenyan countryside, from a public housing project in Las Vegas to a plaza in Buenos Aires, from a Minnesota Indian reservation to the Gaza Strip, the radicalizing events differ but the effects are the same. While most mothers from disparate classes, races, nationalities, cultures, and political ideologies mobilize to protect their children from toxic waste, war, racism, or political persecution, some such as KKK mothers fight to maintain hateful stereotypes that put others at risk. By examining the characteristics, effects, contradictions, and prices of "motherist" politics, we can begin to understand the forces that bring these women out from behind their curtains.



Labor s Great War

Labor   s Great War Author Joseph A. McCartin
ISBN-10 9781469617039
Release 2017-11-01
Pages 320
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Since World War I, says Joseph McCartin, the central problem of American labor relations has been the struggle among workers, managers, and state officials to reconcile democracy and authority in the workplace. In his comprehensive look at labor issues during the decade of the Great War, McCartin explores the political, economic, and social forces that gave rise to this conflict and shows how rising labor militancy and the sudden erosion of managerial control in wartime workplaces combined to create an industrial crisis. The search for a resolution to this crisis led to the formation of an influential coalition of labor Democrats, AFL unionists, and Progressive activists on the eve of U.S. entry into the war. Though the coalition's efforts in pursuit of industrial democracy were eventually frustrated by powerful forces in business and government and by internal rifts within the movement itself, McCartin shows how the shared quest helped cement the ties between unionists and the Democratic Party that would subsequently shape much New Deal legislation and would continue to influence the course of American political and labor history to the present day.