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Controlling human heredity 1865 to the present

Controlling human heredity  1865 to the present Author Diane B. Paul
ISBN-10 UVA:X002686019
Release 1995
Pages 158
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Controlling human heredity 1865 to the present has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Controlling human heredity 1865 to the present also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Controlling human heredity 1865 to the present book for free.



The Politics of Heredity

The Politics of Heredity Author Diane B. Paul
ISBN-10 079143821X
Release 1998
Pages 219
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Explores the political forces underlying shifts in thinking about the respective influence of heredity and environment in shaping human behavior, and the feasibility and morality of eugenics.



Competing with the Soviets

Competing with the Soviets Author Audra J. Wolfe
ISBN-10 9781421407715
Release 2012-11-29
Pages 176
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For most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except open military engagement. The Cold War placed two opposite conceptions of the good society before the uncommitted world and history itself, and science figured prominently in the picture. Competing with the Soviets offers a short, accessible introduction to the special role that science and technology played in maintaining state power during the Cold War, from the atomic bomb to the Human Genome Project. The high-tech machinery of nuclear physics and the space race are at the center of this story, but Audra J. Wolfe also examines the surrogate battlefield of scientific achievement in such diverse fields as urban planning, biology, and economics; explains how defense-driven federal investments created vast laboratories and research programs; and shows how unfamiliar worries about national security and corrosive questions of loyalty crept into the supposedly objective scholarly enterprise. Based on the assumption that scientists are participants in the culture in which they live, Competing with the Soviets looks beyond the debate about whether military influence distorted science in the Cold War. Scientists’ choices and opportunities have always been shaped by the ideological assumptions, political mandates, and social mores of their times. The idea that American science ever operated in a free zone outside of politics is, Wolfe argues, itself a legacy of the ideological Cold War that held up American science, and scientists, as beacons of freedom in contrast to their peers in the Soviet Union. Arranged chronologically and thematically, the book highlights how ideas about the appropriate relationships among science, scientists, and the state changed over time. -- Michael D. Gordin, Princeton University



Genesis

Genesis Author Jan Sapp
ISBN-10 0198035500
Release 2003-09-11
Pages 384
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Genesis: The Evolution of Biology presents a history of the past two centuries of biology, suitable for use in courses, but of interest more broadly to evolutionary biologists, geneticists, and biomedical scientists, as well as general readers interested in the history of science. The book covers the early evolutionary biologists-Lamarck, Cuvier, Darwin and Wallace through Mayr and the neodarwinian synthesis, in much the same way as other histories of evolution have done, bringing in also the social implications, the struggles with our religious understanding, and the interweaving of genetics into evolutionary theory. What is novel about Sapp's account is a real integration of the cytological tradition, from Schwann, Boveri, and the other early cell biologists and embryologists, and the coverage of symbiosis, microbial evolutionary phylogenies, and the new understanding of the diversification of life coming from comparative analyses of complete microbial genomes. The book is a history of theories about evolution, genes and organisms from Lamarck and Darwin to the present day. This is the first book on the general history of evolutionary biology to include the history of research and theories about symbiosis in evolution, and first to include research on microbial evolution which were excluded from the classical neo-Darwinian synthesis. Bacterial evolution, and symbiosis in evolution are also excluded from virtually every book on the history of biology.



Finding Order in Nature

Finding Order in Nature Author Paul Lawrence Farber
ISBN-10 0801863902
Release 2000-06-15
Pages 136
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Since emerging as a discipline in the middle of the eighteenth century, natural history has been at the heart of the life sciences. It gave rise to the major organizing theory of life—evolution—and continues to be a vital science with impressive practical value. Central to advanced work in ecology, agriculture, medicine, and environmental science, natural history also attracts enormous popular interest. In Finding Order in Nature Paul Farber traces the development of the naturalist tradition since the Enlightenment and considers its relationship to other research areas in the life sciences. Written for the general reader and student alike, the volume explores the adventures of early naturalists, the ideas that lay behind classification systems, the development of museums and zoos, and the range of motives that led collectors to collect. Farber also explores the importance of sociocultural contexts, institutional settings, and government funding in the story of this durable discipline. "The quest for insight into the order of nature leads naturalists beyond classification to the creation of general theories that explain the living world. Those naturalists who focus on the order of nature inquire about the ecological relationships among organisms and also among organisms and their surrounding environments. They ask fundamental questions of evolution, about how change actually occurs over short and long periods of time. Many naturalists are drawn, consequently, to deeper philosophical and ethical issues: What is the extent of our ability to understand nature? And, understanding nature, will we be able to preserve it? Naturalists question the meaning of the order they discover and ponder our moral responsibility for it."—from the Introduction



Thinking about Evolution

Thinking about Evolution Author Rama S. Singh
ISBN-10 0521620708
Release 2001
Pages 606
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Originally published in 2001, this is the second of two volumes published by Cambridge University Press in honour of Richard Lewontin. This second volume of essays honours the philosophical, historical and political dimensions of his work. It is fitting that the volume covers such a wide range of perspectives on modern biology, given the range of Lewontin's own contributions. He is not just a very successful practitioner of evolutionary genetics, but a rigorous critic of the practices of genetics and evolutionary biology and an articulate analyst of the social, political and economic contexts and consequences of genetic and evolutionary research. The volume begins with an essay by Lewontin on Natural History and Formalism in Evolutionary Genetics, and includes contributions by former students, post-docs, colleagues and collaborators, which cover issues ranging from the history and conceptual foundations of evolutionary biology and genetics, to the implications of human genetic diversity.



The Science of Human Perfection

The Science of Human Perfection Author Nathaniel Comfort
ISBN-10 9780300169911
Release 2012-09-25
Pages 316
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Almost daily we hear news stories, advertisements, and scientific reports promising that genetic medicine will make us live longer, enable doctors to identify and treat diseases before they harm us, and individualize our medical care. But surprisingly, a century ago eugenicists were making the same promises. This book traces the history of the promises of medical genetics and of the medical dimension of eugenics. While mindful of the benefits of genetic medicine, the book also considers social and ethical issues that cast troublesome shadows over these fields. Keeping his focus on America, Nathaniel Comfort introduces the community of scientists, physicians, and public health workers who have contributed to the development of medical genetics from the nineteenth century to today. He argues that medical genetics is closely related to eugenics, and indeed that the two cannot be fully understood separately. He also carefully examines how the desire to relieve suffering and to improve ourselves genetically, though noble, may be subverted. History makes clear that as patients and consumers we must take ownership of genetic medicine, using it intelligently, knowledgeably, and skeptically.



Misbehaving Science

Misbehaving Science Author Aaron Panofsky
ISBN-10 9780226058597
Release 2014-07-07
Pages 320
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Behavior genetics has always been a breeding ground for controversies. From the “criminal chromosome” to the “gay gene,” claims about the influence of genes like these have led to often vitriolic national debates about race, class, and inequality. Many behavior geneticists have encountered accusations of racism and have had their scientific authority and credibility questioned, ruining reputations, and threatening their access to coveted resources. In Misbehaving Science, Aaron Panofsky traces the field of behavior genetics back to its origins in the 1950s, telling the story through close looks at five major controversies. In the process, Panofsky argues that persistent, ungovernable controversy in behavior genetics is due to the broken hierarchies within the field. All authority and scientific norms are questioned, while the absence of unanimously accepted methods and theories leaves a foundationless field, where disorder is ongoing. Critics charge behavior geneticists with political motivations; champions say they merely follow the data where they lead. But Panofsky shows how pragmatic coping with repeated controversies drives their scientific actions. Ironically, behavior geneticists’ struggles for scientific authority and efforts to deal with the threats to their legitimacy and autonomy have made controversy inevitable—and in some ways essential—to the study of behavior genetics.



Nature Via Nurture

Nature Via Nurture Author Matt Ridley
ISBN-10 9780060006785
Release 2003-04-29
Pages 326
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Documents the 2001 discovery that there are fewer genes in a human genome than previously thought and considers the argument that nurture elements are also largely responsible for human behavior.



The PKU Paradox

The PKU Paradox Author Diane B. Paul
ISBN-10 9781421411316
Release 2013-11-05
Pages 289
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In a lifetime of practice, most physicians will never encounter a single case of PKU. Yet every physician in the industrialized world learns about the disease in medical school and, since the early 1960s, the newborn heel stick test for PKU has been mandatory in many countries. Diane B. Paul and Jeffrey P. Brosco’s beautifully written book explains this paradox. PKU (phenylketonuria) is a genetic disorder that causes severe cognitive impairment if it is not detected and treated with a strict and difficult diet. Programs to detect PKU and start treatment early are deservedly considered a public health success story. Some have traded on this success to urge expanded newborn screening, defend basic research in genetics, and confront proponents of genetic determinism. In this context, treatment for PKU is typically represented as a simple matter of adhering to a low-phenylalanine diet. In reality, the challenges of living with PKU are daunting. In this first general history of PKU, a historian and a pediatrician explore how a rare genetic disease became the object of an unprecedented system for routine testing. The PKU Paradox is informed by interviews with scientists, clinicians, policymakers, and individuals who live with the disease. The questions it raises touch on ongoing controversies about newborn screening and what happens to blood samples collected at birth.



Soldiers of Reason

Soldiers of Reason Author Alex Abella
ISBN-10 0156033445
Release 2009-05
Pages 388
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An in-depth history of the RAND Corporation describes the behind-the-scenes role of the secretive think tank in shaping American political policy for six decades, detailing its origins, the part it played during the Cold War, and its development of the rational choice theory. Reprint.



The Selfish Gene

The Selfish Gene Author Richard Dawkins
ISBN-10 0192860925
Release 1989
Pages 352
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An ethologist shows man to be a gene machine whose world is one of savage competition and deceit



Natural Inheritance

Natural Inheritance Author Francis Galton
ISBN-10 STANFORD:24503378790
Release 1889
Pages 259
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In this book the first statistical study of biological variation and inheritance is represented. Galton used statistical methods and propounded a "law of filial regression".



Heredity and Hope

Heredity and Hope Author Ruth Schwartz COWAN
ISBN-10 9780674029927
Release 2009-06-30
Pages 292
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Neither minimizing the difficulty of the choices that modern genetics has created for us nor fearing them, Cowan argues that we can improve the quality of our own lives and the lives of our children by using the modern science and technology of genetic screening responsibly.



Nature s Ghosts

Nature s Ghosts Author Mark V. Barrow, Jr.
ISBN-10 9780226038155
Release 2011-04-15
Pages 512
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The rapid growth of the American environmental movement in recent decades obscures the fact that long before the first Earth Day and the passage of the Endangered Species Act, naturalists and concerned citizens recognized—and worried about—the problem of human-caused extinction. As Mark V. Barrow reveals in Nature’s Ghosts, the threat of species loss has haunted Americans since the early days of the republic. From Thomas Jefferson’s day—when the fossil remains of such fantastic lost animals as the mastodon and the woolly mammoth were first reconstructed—through the pioneering conservation efforts of early naturalists like John James Audubon and John Muir, Barrow shows how Americans came to understand that it was not only possible for entire species to die out, but that humans themselves could be responsible for their extinction. With the destruction of the passenger pigeon and the precipitous decline of the bison, professional scientists and wildlife enthusiasts alike began to understand that even very common species were not safe from the juggernaut of modern, industrial society. That realization spawned public education and legislative campaigns that laid the foundation for the modern environmental movement and the preservation of such iconic creatures as the bald eagle, the California condor, and the whooping crane. A sweeping, beautifully illustrated historical narrative that unites the fascinating stories of endangered animals and the dedicated individuals who have studied and struggled to protect them, Nature’s Ghosts offers an unprecedented view of what we’ve lost—and a stark reminder of the hard work of preservation still ahead.



Genomics

Genomics Author Mike Starkey
ISBN-10 9780470711620
Release 2010-10-19
Pages 360
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Genomics research has made significant advances in recent years. In this book, a team of internationally-renowned researchers share the most up-to-date information in a field that has in recent years switched emphasis from gene identification to functional genomics and the characterization of genes and gene products. This volume approaches this complex subject with a broad perspective to supply the reader with a vital overview of genomics and its derivative fields, with a focus on pivotal issues such as data analysis. Expansive and current, this book is a comprehensive research guide that describes both the key new techniques and more established methods. Every chapter discusses the merits and limitations of the various approaches and then provides selected tried-and-tested protocols, as well as a plethora of good practical advice for immediate use at the bench. Key features: Provides a broad introduction to current practices and techniques for lab-based research in genomics Explains clearly and precisely how to carry out selected techniques in addition to background information on the various approaches Chapters are written by a leading international authorities in the field and cover both well-known and new, tried and tested, methods for working in genomics Includes troubleshooting guide and reviews of alternative techniques An essential laboratory manual for students and researchers at all levels



Explaining Epidemics

Explaining Epidemics Author Charles E. Rosenberg
ISBN-10 0521395690
Release 1992-08-28
Pages 357
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Collection of author's essays previously published individually