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Death and Burial in the Roman World

Death and Burial in the Roman World Author J. M. C. Toynbee
ISBN-10 0801855071
Release 1996-10-04
Pages 336
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Toynbee's comprehensive examination of Roman burial practices, ranging throughout the Roman world from Rome to Pompeii, Britain to Jerusalem. A broad perspective is adopted, which takes in beliefs about death and the afterlife, rituals associated with burial and mourning, and descriptions of cemeteries and tombs themselves.



Death and Burial in the Roman World

Death and Burial in the Roman World Author J. M. C. Toynbee
ISBN-10 OCLC:472542104
Release 1996
Pages 336
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Death and Burial in the Roman World has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Death and Burial in the Roman World also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Death and Burial in the Roman World book for free.



Burial in the Roman World

Burial in the Roman World Author Richard Reece
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105031840114
Release 1977
Pages 66
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Burial in the Roman World has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Burial in the Roman World also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Burial in the Roman World book for free.



Death in Ancient Rome

Death in Ancient Rome Author Valerie Hope
ISBN-10 9781134323098
Release 2007-11-13
Pages 288
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Presenting a wide range of relevant, translated texts on death, burial and commemoration in the Roman world, this book is organized thematically and supported by discussion of recent scholarship. The breadth of material included ensures that this sourcebook will shed light on the way death was thought about and dealt with in Roman society.



The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity

The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity Author Éric Rebillard
ISBN-10 9780801459160
Release 2009-05-21
Pages 240
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In this provocative book Éric Rebillard challenges many long-held assumptions about early Christian burial customs. For decades scholars of early Christianity have argued that the Church owned and operated burial grounds for Christians as early as the third century. Through a careful reading of primary sources including legal codes, theological works, epigraphical inscriptions, and sermons, Rebillard shows that there is little evidence to suggest that Christians occupied exclusive or isolated burial grounds in this early period. In fact, as late as the fourth and fifth centuries the Church did not impose on the faithful specific rituals for laying the dead to rest. In the preparation of Christians for burial, it was usually next of kin and not representatives of the Church who were responsible for what form of rite would be celebrated, and evidence from inscriptions and tombstones shows that for the most part Christians didn't separate themselves from non-Christians when burying their dead. According to Rebillard it would not be until the early Middle Ages that the Church gained control over burial practices and that "Christian cemeteries" became common. In this translation of Religion et Sépulture: L'église, les vivants et les morts dans l'Antiquité tardive, Rebillard fundamentally changes our understanding of early Christianity. The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity will force scholars of the period to rethink their assumptions about early Christians as separate from their pagan contemporaries in daily life and ritual practice.



Death and the Emperor

Death and the Emperor Author Penelope J. E. Davies
ISBN-10 9780292789562
Release 2010-06-28
Pages 281
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The role of monuments in the Roman imperial cult.



The Transformation of the Roman World AD 400 900

The Transformation of the Roman World AD 400 900 Author Leslie Webster
ISBN-10 0520210603
Release 1997
Pages 258
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The fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of what we call the Middle Ages was a period of tremendous change and upheaval in Europe and Byzantium. Focusing on these pivotal five centuries in European history, this wide-ranging study features essays by an international team of distinguished scholars. Their essays survey the most significant aspects of the transition from late Antiquity to the early Middle Ages: the later Roman empire, the barbarian successor states, estates and property, wealth and treasure, production and distribution, death and burial rites, cult and worship, and the transmission of ideas. The essays are accompanied by six shorter chapters based on related exhibitions in museums throughout Europe during 1997, with themes ranging from Roman villas to Scandinavian gold brooches, Byzantine burial practices to medieval Dutch hoards. Handsomely illustrated in both color and black and white, the book also contains a helpful glossary and gazetteer of principal place names.



Memory and Mourning

Memory and Mourning Author Valerie M. Hope
ISBN-10 184217990X
Release 2011
Pages 200
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Death is a life crisis; a time of change and transformation, for the dead and the bereaved. Thus how dying, death and death rituals are used, described, presented and interpreted is fundamental to any society. This volume includes ten chapters, from expert contributors, which explore funerary rituals and commemoration in the Roman world, focusing upon the themes of memory and mourning. How were the memories of the dead constructed and contested; what role did funerals, oratory-and history, writing play in the names of the dead; how Were the dead mourned and commemorated? This volume challenges boundaries between traditional academic disciplines and utilizes current approaches in Scholarship. It-highlights how death was interwoven with Roman life and brings together diverse evidence such is poetry, oratory, portraiture, epigraphy, and funerary monuments. These chapters individually and collectively demonstrate the significance of studying the evidence for Roman death and death rituals, and how concerns for memory and mourning both shaped and were reflected in that evidence.



Death Burial and Rebirth in the Religions of Antiquity

Death  Burial and Rebirth in the Religions of Antiquity Author Jon Davies
ISBN-10 9781134792726
Release 2013-04-03
Pages 272
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In Death, Burial and Rebirth in the Religions of Antiquity, Jon Davies charts the significance of death to the emerging religious cults in the pre-Christian and early Christian world. He analyses the varied burial rituals and examines the different notions of the afterlife. Among the areas covered are: * Osiris and Isis: the life theology of Ancient Egypt * burying the Jewish dead * Roman religion and Roman funerals * Early Christian burial * the nature of martyrdom. Jon Davies also draws on the sociological theory of Max Weber to present a comprehensive introduction to and overview of death, burial and the afterlife in the first Christian centuries which offers insights into the relationship between social change and attitudes to death and dying.



Death Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity

Death Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity Author Ian Morris
ISBN-10 0521376114
Release 1992-10-22
Pages 264
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The chief purpose of this book is to show how burials may be used as a uniquely informative source for Greek and Roman social history. Burials permit a far wider range of inference and insight than the literary texts produced by and for a narrow social elite, and by studying them in depth Dr. Morris is able to offer new interpretations of social change in Graeco-Roman antiquity. The major interdisciplinary importance of the book lies in its attempt to break down barriers between archaeologists and historians of different societies and cultures.



Necropolis

Necropolis Author Catharine Arnold
ISBN-10 9781847394934
Release 2008-10-15
Pages 320
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From Roman burial rites to the horrors of the plague, from the founding of the great Victorian cemeteries to the development of cremation and the current approach of metropolitan society towards death and bereavement -- including more recent trends to displays of collective grief and the cult of mourning, such as that surrounding the death of Diana, Princess of Wales -- NECROPOLIS: LONDON AND ITS DEAD offers a vivid historical narrative of this great city's attitude to going the way of all flesh. As layer upon layer of London soil reveals burials from pre-historic and medieval times, the city is revealed as one giant grave, filled with the remains of previous eras -- pagan, Roman, medieval, Victorian. This fascinating blend of archaeology, architecture and anecdote includes such phenomena as the rise of the undertaking trade and the pageantry of state funerals; public executions and bodysnatching. Ghoulishly entertaining and full of fascinating nuggets of information, Necropolis leaves no headstone unturned in its exploration of our changing attitudes to the deceased among us. Both anecdotal history and cultural commentary, Necropolis will take its place alongside classics of the city such as Peter Ackroyd's LONDON.



Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology Author
ISBN-10 0199846537
Release 2013-07-18
Pages 1152
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The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology represents a new way of conceiving of the relationship between archaeology and biblical studies. The Encyclopedia captures the dynamics of current scholarship and links archaeological finds to the biblical texts.



Living Through the Dead

Living Through the Dead Author Maureen Carroll
ISBN-10 1842173766
Release 2011
Pages 209
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This volume investigates the archaeology of death and commemoration through thematically linked case studies drawn from the Classical world. These investigations stress the processes of burial and commemoration as inherently social and designed for an audience, and they explore the meaning and importance attached to preserving memory. While previous investigations of Greek and Roman death and burial have tended to concentrate on period- or regionally-specific sets of data, this volume instead focuses on a series of topical connections that highlight important facets of death and commemoration significant to the larger Classical world. Living through the dead investigates the subject of death and commemoration from a diverse set of archaeologically informed approaches, including visual reception, detailed analysis of excavated remains, landscape, and post-classical reflections and draws on artefactual, documentary and pictorial evidence. The nine papers present recent research by some of the leading voices on the subject, as well as some fresh perspectives. Case studies come from Thermopylae, the Bosporan kingdom, Athens, Republican Rome, Pompeii and Egypt. As a collected volume, they provide thematically linked investigations of key issues in ritual, memory and (self)presentation associated with death and burial in the Classical period. As such, this volume will be of particular interest to postgraduate students and academics with specialist interests in the archaeology of the Classical world and also more broadly, as a source of comparative material, to people working on issues related to the archaeology of death and commemoration.



Death As a Process

Death As a Process Author John Pearce
ISBN-10 1785703234
Release 2017
Pages 272
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Wide ranging exploration of how archaeological evidence for death and burial in the Roman world can illustrate process and ritual sequence, from laying out the dead to the pyre and tomb, and from placing the dead in the earth to the return of the living to commemorate them.



Infancy and Earliest Childhood in the Roman World

Infancy and Earliest Childhood in the Roman World Author Maureen Carroll
ISBN-10 9780199687633
Release 2018-03-29
Pages 336
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Despite the developing emphasis in current scholarship on children in Roman culture, there has been relatively little research to date on the role and significance of the youngest children within the family and in society. This volume singles out this youngest age group, the under one-year-olds, in the first comprehensive study of infancy and earliest childhood to encompass the Roman Empire as a whole: integrating social and cultural history with archaeological evidence, funerary remains, material culture, and the iconography of infancy, it explores how the very particular historical circumstances into which Roman children were born affected their lives as well as prevailing attitudes towards them. Examination of these varied strands of evidence, drawn from throughout the Roman world from the fourth century BC to the third century AD, allows the rhetoric about earliest childhood in Roman texts to be more broadly contextualized and reveals the socio-cultural developments that took place in parent-child relationships over this period. Presenting a fresh perspective on archaeological and historical debates, the volume refutes the notion that high infant mortality conditioned Roman parents not to engage in the early life of their children or to view them, or their deaths, with indifference, and concludes that even within the first weeks and months of life Roman children were invested with social and gendered identities and were perceived as having both personhood and value within society.



Children Death and Burial

Children  Death and Burial Author Eileen Murphy
ISBN-10 9781785707155
Release 2017-08-31
Pages 240
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Children, Death and Burials assembles a panorama of studies with a focus on juvenile burials; the 16 papers have a wide geographic and temporal breadth and represent a range of methodological approaches. All have a similar objective in mind, however, namely to understand how children were treated in death by different cultures in the past; to gain insights concerning the roles of children of different ages in their respective societies and to find evidence of the nature of past adult–child relationships and interactions across the life course. The contextualisation and integration of the data collected, both in the field and in the laboratory, enables more nuanced understandings to be gained in relation to the experiences of the young in the past. A broad range of issues are addressed within the volume, including the inclusion/exclusion of children in particular burial environments and the impact of age in relation to the place of children in society. Child burials clearly embody identity and ‘the domestic child’, ‘the vulnerable child’, ‘the high status child’, ‘the cherished child’, ‘the potential child’, ‘the ritual child’ and the ‘political child’, and combinations thereof, are evident throughout the narratives. Investigation of the burial practices afforded to children is pivotal to enlightenment in relation to key facets of past life, including the emotional responses shown towards children during life and in death, as well as an understanding of their place within the social strata and ritual activities of their societies. An important new collection of papers by leading researchers in funerary archaeology, examining the particular treatment of juvenile burials in the past. In particular focuses on the expression of varying status and identity of children in the funerary archaeological record as a key to understanding the place of children in different societies.



Death in Ancient Rome

Death in Ancient Rome Author Catharine Edwards
ISBN-10 0300112084
Release 2007
Pages 287
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For the Romans, the manner of a person’s death was the most telling indication of their true character. Death revealed the true patriot, the genuine philosopher, even, perhaps, the great artist--and certainly the faithful Christian. Catharine Edwards draws on the many and richly varied accounts of death in the writings of Roman historians, poets, and philosophers, including Cicero, Lucretius, Virgil, Seneca, Petronius, Tacitus, Tertullian, and Augustine, to investigate the complex significance of dying in the Roman world. Death in the Roman world was largely understood and often literally viewed as a spectacle. Those deaths that figured in recorded history were almost invariably violent--murders, executions, suicides--and yet the most admired figures met their ends with exemplary calm, their last words set down for posterity. From noble deaths in civil war, mortal combat between gladiators, political execution and suicide, to the deathly dinner of Domitian, the harrowing deaths of women such as the mythical Lucretia and Nero’s mother Agrippina, as well as instances of Christian martyrdom, Edwards engagingly explores the culture of death in Roman literature and history.