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Emerald Labyrinth

Emerald Labyrinth Author Eli Greenbaum
ISBN-10 9781512601206
Release 2017-11-07
Pages 336
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Emerald Labyrinth is a scientist and adventurer's chronicle of years exploring the rainforests of sub-Saharan Africa. The richly varied habitats of the Democratic Republic of the Congo offer a wealth of animal, plant, chemical, and medical discoveries. But the country also has a deeply troubled colonial past and a complicated political present. Author Eli Greenbaum is a leading expert in sub-Saharan herpetology - snakes, lizards, and frogs - who brings a sense of wonder to the question of how science works in the twenty-first century. Along the way he comes face to face with spitting cobras, silverback mountain gorillas, wild elephants, and the teenaged armies of AK-47-toting fighters engaged in the continent's longest-running war. As a bellwether of the climate and biodiversity crises now facing the planet, the Congo holds the key to our planet's future. Writing in the tradition of books like The Lost City of Z, Greenbaum seeks out the creatures struggling to survive in a war-torn, environmentally threatened country. Emerald Labyrinth is an extraordinary book about the enormous challenges and hard-won satisfactions of doing science in one of the least known, least hospitable places on earth.



Emerald Labyrinth

Emerald Labyrinth Author Eli Greenbaum
ISBN-10 1512600970
Release 2017
Pages 336
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The race to explore the Congo's dwindling biodiversity and unlock its ancient secrets



The Forest Unseen

The Forest Unseen Author David George Haskell
ISBN-10 9781101561065
Release 2012-03-15
Pages 288
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A biologist reveals the secret world hidden in a single square meter of old-growth forest--a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Pen/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award Look out for David Haskell's new book, The Songs of Tree: Stories From Nature's Great Connectors, coming in April of 2017 In this wholly original book, biologist David Haskell uses a one- square-meter patch of old-growth Tennessee forest as a window onto the entire natural world. Visiting it almost daily for one year to trace nature's path through the seasons, he brings the forest and its inhabitants to vivid life. Each of this book's short chapters begins with a simple observation: a salamander scuttling across the leaf litter; the first blossom of spring wildflowers. From these, Haskell spins a brilliant web of biology and ecology, explaining the science that binds together the tiniest microbes and the largest mammals and describing the ecosystems that have cycled for thousands- sometimes millions-of years. Each visit to the forest presents a nature story in miniature as Haskell elegantly teases out the intricate relationships that order the creatures and plants that call it home. Written with remarkable grace and empathy, The Forest Unseen is a grand tour of nature in all its profundity. Haskell is a perfect guide into the world that exists beneath our feet and beyond our backyards. From the Hardcover edition.



The Lost Species

The Lost Species Author Christopher Kemp
ISBN-10 9780226386355
Release 2017-10-23
Pages 256
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The tiny, lungless Thorius salamander from southern Mexico, thinner than a match and smaller than a quarter. The lushly white-coated Saki, an arboreal monkey from the Brazilian rainforests. The olinguito, a native of the Andes, which looks part mongoose, part teddy bear. These fantastic species are all new to science—at least newly named and identified; but they weren’t discovered in the wild, instead, they were unearthed in the drawers and cavernous basements of natural history museums. As Christopher Kemp reveals in The Lost Species, hiding in the cabinets and storage units of natural history museums is a treasure trove of discovery waiting to happen. With Kemp as our guide, we go spelunking into museum basements, dig through specimen trays, and inspect the drawers and jars of collections, scientific detectives on the hunt for new species. We discover king crabs from 1906, unidentified tarantulas, mislabeled Himalayan landsnails, an unknown rove beetle originally collected by Darwin, and an overlooked squeaker frog, among other curiosities. In each case, these specimens sat quietly for decades—sometimes longer than a century—within the collections of museums, before sharp-eyed scientists understood they were new. Each year, scientists continue to encounter new species in museum collections—a stark reminder that we have named only a fraction of the world’s biodiversity. Sadly, some specimens have waited so long to be named that they are gone from the wild before they were identified, victims of climate change and habitat loss. As Kemp shows, these stories showcase the enduring importance of these very collections. The Lost Species vividly tells these stories of discovery—from the latest information on each creature to the people who collected them and the scientists who finally realized what they had unearthed—and will inspire many a museumgoer to want to peek behind the closed doors and rummage through the archives.



Mean and Lowly Things

Mean and Lowly Things Author Kate Jackson
ISBN-10 9780674039025
Release 2009-06-30
Pages 336
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In 2005 Jackson ventured into the remote swamp forests of the northern Congo to collect reptiles and amphibians. This book is Jackson's unvarnished account of her research on the front lines of the global biodiversity crisis—coping with interminable delays in obtaining permits, learning to outrun advancing army ants, subsisting on a diet of Spam and manioc, and ultimately falling in love with the strangely beautiful flooded forest.



American Snakes

American Snakes Author Sean P. Graham
ISBN-10 9781421423609
Release 2018-02-18
Pages 312
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125 million years ago on the floodplains of North America, a burrowing lizard started down the long evolutionary path of shedding its limbs. The 60-plus species of snakes found in Sean P. Graham’s American Snakes have this ancestral journey to thank for their ubiquity, diversity, and beauty. Although many people fear them, snakes are as much a part of America’s rich natural heritage as redwoods, bald eagles, and grizzly bears. Found from the vast Okefenokee Swamp to high alpine meadows, from hardwood canopies to the burning bottom of the Grand Canyon, these ultimate vertebrates are ecologically pivotal predators and quintessential survivors. In this revelatory and engaging meditation on American snakes, Graham, a respected herpetologist and gifted writer, • explains the everyday lives of American snakes, from their daily routines and seasonal cycles to their love lives, hunting tactics, and defensive repertoires • debunks harmful myths about snakes and explores their relationship with humans • highlights the contribution of snakes to the American wilderness • tells tales of "snake people"—important snake biologists with inspiring careers Neither a typical field guide nor an exhaustive reference, American Snakes is instead a fascinating study of the suborder Serpentes. Brimming with intriguing and unusual stories—of hognose snakes that roll over and play dead, blindsnakes with tiny vestigial lungs, rainbow-hued dipsadines, and wave-surfing sea-snakes—the text is interspersed with scores of gorgeous full-color images of snakes, from the scary to the sublime. This proud celebration of a diverse American wildlife group will make every reader, no matter how skeptical, into a genuine snake lover.



Braiding Sweetgrass

Braiding Sweetgrass Author Robin Wall Kimmerer
ISBN-10 9781571318718
Release 2013-09-16
Pages 320
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As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert). Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.



The Tapir s Morning Bath

The Tapir s Morning Bath Author Elizabeth Royte
ISBN-10 0618257586
Release 2002
Pages 328
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Journeys to the rain forest on Panama's Barro Colorado Island to trace the intricate workings of this complex ecological habitat and examines the work of the scientists racing against time to classify, understand, and preserve an endangered environment. Reprint.



The End of the Long Summer

The End of the Long Summer Author Dianne Dumanoski
ISBN-10 0307452220
Release 2009-07-14
Pages 320
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For the past twelve thousand years, Earth’s stable climate has allowed human civilization to flourish. But this long benign summer is an anomaly in the Earth’s history and one that is rapidly coming to a close. The radical experiment of our modern industrial civilization is now disrupting our planet’s very metabolism; our future hinges in large part on how Earth responds. Climate change is already bearing down, hitting harder and faster than expected. The greatest danger is not extreme yet discrete weather events, such as Hurricane Katrina or the calamitous wildfires that now plague California, but profound and systemic disruptions on a global scale. Contrary to the pervasive belief that climate change will be a gradual escalator ride into balmier temperatures, the Earth’s climate system has a history of radical shifts–dramatic shocks that could lead to the collapse of social and economic systems. The question is no longer simply how can we stop climate change, but how can we as a civilization survive it. The guiding values of modern culture have become dangerously obsolete in this new era. Yet as renowned environmental journalist Dianne Dumanoski shows, little has been done to avert the crisis or to prepare human societies for a time of growing instability. In a work of astonishing scope, Dumanoski deftly weaves history, science, and culture to show how the fundamental doctrines of modern society have impeded our ability to respond to this crisis and have fostered an economic globalization that is only increasing our vulnerability at this critical time. She exposes the fallacy of banking on a last-minute technological fix as well as the perilous trap of believing that humans can succeed in the quest to control nature. Only by restructuring our global civilization based on the principles that have allowed Earth’s life and our ancestors to survive catastrophe——diversity, redundancy, a degree of self-sufficiency, social solidarity, and an aversion to excessive integration——can we restore the flexibility needed to weather the trials ahead. In this powerful and prescient book, Dumanoski moves beyond now-ubiquitous environmental buzzwords about green industries and clean energy to provide a new cultural map through this dangerous passage. Though the message is grave, it is not without hope. Lucid, eloquent, and urgent, The End of the Long Summer deserves a place alongside transformative works such as Silent Spring and The Fate of the Earth. From the Hardcover edition.



Cane Toad Wars

Cane Toad Wars Author Rick Shine
ISBN-10 9780520967984
Release 2018-03-20
Pages 288
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In 1935, an Australian government agency imported 101 specimens of the Central and South American Cane Toad in an attempt to manage insects that were decimating sugar-cane harvests. In Australia the Cane Toad adapted and evolved with abandon, voraciously consuming native wildlife and killing predators with its lethal skin toxin. Today, hundreds of millions of Cane Toads have spread across the northern part of Australia and continue to move westward. The humble Cane Toad has become a national villain. Cane Toad Wars chronicles the work of intrepid scientist Rick Shine, who has been documenting the toad’s ecological impact in Australia and seeking to buffer it. Despite predictions of devastation in the wake of advancing toad hordes, the author’s research reveals a more complex and nuanced story. A firsthand account of a perplexing ecological problem and an important exploration of how we measure evolutionary change and ecological resilience, this book makes an effective case for the value of long-term natural history research in informing conservation practice.



The Man Who Planted Trees

The Man Who Planted Trees Author Jim Robbins
ISBN-10 9780812981292
Release 2015
Pages 233
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Describes the efforts of a former alcoholic nurseryman, whose near-death experience prompted him to attempt to find the best specimens of the U.S.' 872 known species of trees and use them to propagate their offspring around the world. By the author of A Symphony in the Brain. 25,000 first printing.



The Songs of Trees

The Songs of Trees Author David George Haskell
ISBN-10 9780525427520
Release 2017
Pages 304
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No Marketing Blurb



The Texas Tortoise

The Texas Tortoise Author Francis L. Rose
ISBN-10 0806144513
Release 2014
Pages 188
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Remnants of an ancient lineage, tortoises date back to the Eocene. Among the five species remaining in North America, Texas tortoises are the smallest in size and inhabit some of the harshest arid environments known. They are also the most neglected by wildlife personnel. In The Texas Tortoise, biologists Francis L. Rose and Frank W. Judd draw on decades of research to offer the first comprehensive account of this fascinating but threatened species. The authors begin by explaining the relationship of the Texas tortoise to other species, fossil as well as extant. They delineate the Texas tortoise’s environment and describe what it eats, how the animal grows and reproduces, and how it behaves. Throughout, Rose and Judd write eloquently about the threats to the species’ survival, reflecting deep concern about its future protection. The authors also discuss Texas tortoises’ significance in supporting other species in their environment—southern Texas and northeastern Mexico—where their survival is threatened by habitat reduction and increasing road traffic. “If you see a tortoise on the roadway,” Rose and Judd admonish the reader, “move it to safety, and drive away as quickly as legally allowed.” It is in fact illegal to collect or possess a Texas tortoise. But for those who do, this book advises how to care for the animal. Tortoises have enjoyed a splendid and diverse history. That they did so well for so long is perplexing, the authors note, as the animals are slow and do not actively defend themselves against predators. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department lists Texas tortoises as “threatened,” and Rose and Judd call on the federal government to do the same. Biologists, conservationists, and turtle enthusiasts alike will find this guide to Texas and other tortoises invaluable.



The Ghosts Of Evolution

The Ghosts Of Evolution Author Connie Barlow
ISBN-10 0786724897
Release 2008-08-05
Pages 352
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A new vision is sweeping through ecological science: The dense web of dependencies that makes up an ecosystem has gained an added dimension-the dimension of time. Every field, forest, and park is full of living organisms adapted for relationships with creatures that are now extinct. In a vivid narrative, Connie Barlow shows how the idea of "missing partners" in nature evolved from isolated, curious examples into an idea that is transforming how ecologists understand the entire flora and fauna of the Americas. This fascinating book will enrich the experience of any amateur naturalist, as well as teach us that the ripples of biodiversity loss around us are just the leading edge of what may well become perilous cascades of extinction.



Faith in a Seed

Faith in a Seed Author Henry D. Thoreau
ISBN-10 1597262870
Release 1993-03-01
Pages 301
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Faith in a Seed contains the hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds, one of Henry D. Thoreau's last important research and writing projects, and now his first new book to appear in 125 years.With the remarkable clarity and grace that characterize all of his writings, Thoreau describes the ecological succession of plant species through seed dispersal. The Dispersion of Seeds, which draws on Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, refutes the then widely accepted theory that some plants spring spontaneously to life, independent of roots, cuttings, or seeds. As Thoreau wrote: "Though I do not believe a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders." Henry D. Thoreau's Faith in a Seed, was first published in hardcover in 1993 by Island Press under the Shearwater Books imprint, which unifies scientific views of nature with humanistic ones. This important work, the first publication of Thoreau's last manuscript, is now available in paperback. Faith in a Seed contains Thoreau's last important research and writing project, The Dispersion of Seeds, along with other natural history writings from late in his life. Edited by Bradley P. Dean, professor of English at East Carolina University and editor of the Thoreau Society Bulletin, these writings demonstrate how a major American author at the height of his career succeeded in making science and literature mutually enriching.



Liquid Land

Liquid Land Author Ted Levin
ISBN-10 0820326720
Release 2004
Pages 312
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In "Liquid Land," Levin guides readers past the dire headlines about the Everglades' demise and into the magnificent swamp itself, where they come face-to-face with the remaining plants, animals, and landscapes that will survive only if the public protects them.



The Biodiversity Crisis

The Biodiversity Crisis Author Michael J. Novacek
ISBN-10 1565845706
Release 2001
Pages 223
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Leading experts explain the fastest mass extinction in Earth's history in an illustrated companion to the American Museum of Natural History's new permanent exhibit. 60 photos. Illustrations.