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Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools

Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools Author Edna Tan
ISBN-10 9780226037998
Release 2012-08-15
Pages 224
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Math and science hold powerful places in contemporary society, setting the foundations for entry into some of the most robust and highest-paying industries. However, effective math and science education is not equally available to all students, with some of the poorest students—those who would benefit most—going egregiously underserved. This ongoing problem with education highlights one of the core causes of the widening class gap. While this educational inequality can be attributed to a number of economic and political causes, in Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Communities, Angela Calabrese Barton and Edna Tan demonstrate that it is augmented by a consistent failure to integrate student history, culture, and social needs into the core curriculum. They argue that teachers and schools should create hybrid third spaces—neither classroom nor home—in which underserved students can merge their personal worlds with those of math and science. A host of examples buttress this argument: schools where these spaces have been instituted now provide students not only an immediate motivation to engage the subjects most critical to their future livelihoods but also the broader math and science literacy necessary for robust societal engagement. A unique look at a frustratingly understudied subject, Empowering Science and Mathematics Education pushes beyond the idea of teaching for social justice and into larger questions of how and why students participate in math and science.



Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools

Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools Author Edna Tan
ISBN-10 9780226037974
Release 2012-08-15
Pages 224
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Argue that teachers and schools should create hybrid third spaces - neither classroom nor home - in which underserved students can merge their personal worlds with those of maths and science.



Teaching Science for Social Justice

Teaching Science for Social Justice Author Angela Calabrese Barton
ISBN-10 9780807743836
Release 2003
Pages 197
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Using a combination of in-depth case studies and rigorous theory, this volume; provides valuable insight to help teachers work with inner-city youth; explores the importance of inclusiveness, membership rules, and the purposes and goals of good science; and shows how science connects to the lives of youth both in and out of school.



Rethinking Mathematics

Rethinking Mathematics Author Eric Gutstein
ISBN-10 9780942961546
Release 2005-01-01
Pages 179
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A collection of more than thirty articles shows teachers how to weave social justice principles throughout the math curriculum, and how to integrate social justice math into other curricular areas as well.



What Every Science Student Should Know

What Every Science Student Should Know Author Justin L. Bauer
ISBN-10 9780226198880
Release 2016-05-06
Pages 283
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Every year, six million students enter college with the intention of becoming a science major by the time they graduate, only 60% of them will actually follow through. This means that close to 2.4 million students, every year, drop out of the science track. According to the New York Times, roughly 40% of students planning science majors either end up switching their major or fail to get any degree. Furthermore, aspiring pre-medical students (who comprise a large percentage of the freshmen class at most colleges, but who may not be science majors) often cite frustrations with science coursework/grading as a main motivation for changing their career plans. What Every College Science Student Should Know teaches students everything they need to know about how to succeed in school and after graduation. It s a portable guide and mentor that teaches study skills, course selection and mastery, how to do scientific research, what to expect from majors, how to find mentors, and how to apply learned skills to career development and enjoyment. Written by recent college graduates for entering college students and seniors in high school, What Every College Science Student Should Know is an invaluable resource for those who want to pursue a science degree, and it s also an inspiring narrative of remarkable students who are already changing the world through science."



Africa as a Living Laboratory

Africa as a Living Laboratory Author Helen Tilley
ISBN-10 9780226803487
Release 2011-04-15
Pages 520
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Tropical Africa was one of the last regions of the world to experience formal European colonialism, a process that coincided with the advent of a range of new scientific specialties and research methods. Africa as a Living Laboratory is a far-reaching study of the thorny relationship between imperialism and the role of scientific expertise—environmental, medical, racial, and anthropological—in the colonization of British Africa. A key source for Helen Tilley’s analysis is the African Research Survey, a project undertaken in the 1930s to explore how modern science was being applied to African problems. This project both embraced and recommended an interdisciplinary approach to research on Africa that, Tilley argues, underscored the heterogeneity of African environments and the interrelations among the problems being studied. While the aim of British colonialists was unquestionably to transform and modernize Africa, their efforts, Tilley contends, were often unexpectedly subverted by scientific concerns with the local and vernacular. Meticulously researched and gracefully argued, Africa as a Living Laboratory transforms our understanding of imperial history, colonial development, and the role science played in both.



Culturally Specific Pedagogy in the Mathematics Classroom

Culturally Specific Pedagogy in the Mathematics Classroom Author Jacqueline Leonard
ISBN-10 9781351225441
Release 2017-10-03
Pages 232
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"Culturally Specific Pedagogy in the Mathematic Classroom offers a wide variety of conceptual and curricular resources for teachers interested in teaching mathematics in a way that challenges stratification based upon race, class, gender and other forms of oppression that students face in today?s world?. With the publication of this book, all teachers will have available to them instructional strategies in mathematics for meeting the academic needs of culturally diverse students. They will have an explanation of the linkage between culture and students? mathematical cognition and problem solving?. The ease in which Leonard brings the reader along, and the caring way she tells a story about making mathematics a fun and social justice experience makes for an exciting learning opportunity for all students and teachers." Carl A. Grant, University Wisconsin-Madison, United States, From the Foreword "Mathematics educators are in a period of deep concern about our ability to educate all students in mathematics. Most students of color do not have the opportunities to fully learn mathematics. Nothing more important can be done for these students and their teachers than to publish this book addressing the miseducation of these students and offering a way to change what we are doing." Carol E. Malloy, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, United States This compelling text advocates the use of culturally specific pedagogy to enhance the mathematics instruction of diverse students. It accomplishes this by making clear the link between research and practice and offering lesson templates that teachers can use with ethnically and culturally diverse students and with females. Specifically, the text draws on sociocultural theory and research on culture and mathematics cognition to focus on three goals: using qualitative research to extend the literature on culturally based education to African American and Latina/o c



Demands of the Day

Demands of the Day Author Paul Rabinow
ISBN-10 9780226036885
Release 2013-05-23
Pages 136
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Demands of the Day asks about the logical standards and forms that should guide ethical and experimental anthropology in the twenty-first century. Anthropologists Paul Rabinow and Anthony Stavrianakis do so by taking up Max Weber’s notion of the “demands of the day.” Just as the demand of the day for anthropology decades ago consisted of thinking about fieldwork, today, they argue, the demand is to examine what happens after, how the experiences of fieldwork are gathered, curated, narrated, and ultimately made available for an anthropological practice that moves beyond mere ethnographic description. Rabinow and Stavrianakis draw on experiences from an innovative set of anthropological experiments that investigated how and whether the human and biological sciences could be brought into a mutually enriching relationship. Conceptualizing the anthropological and philosophic ramifications of these inquiries, they offer a bold challenge to contemporary anthropology to undertake a more rigorous examination of its own practices, blind spots, and capacities, in order to meet the demands of our day.



Research in Urban Educational Settings

Research in Urban Educational Settings Author Kimberly A. Scott
ISBN-10 9781617352089
Release 2010-03-01
Pages 245
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Results from quantitative and qualitative research studies have painted countless images of the unique features shaping urban schools including students' experiences and how the surrounding communities affect the entire system. Race, ethnicity, social class, language, power, politics, and public image operate as intersecting elements shaping the contours of urban school life therefore its documentation. Little has been written about how researchers of urban schools and their constituencies effectively navigate these complex elements, design a culturally sensitive and responsive project, and acquire meaningful data. What are some of the critically important issues a researcher should consider when working with urban schools? What should be a researcher's commitment to the urban communities in which they conduct research? How can a researcher develop a trusting relationship in an environment justifiably distrustful of outsiders? These and other inquiries shape the contours of this edited volume. As educators and policy makers take a closer examination at urban schools and their successes, research of these unique settings assumes a more prominent role. For academics, both novice and experienced, establishing and maintaining rapport within these environments often require greater attention than qualitative or quantitative research books accord. Authors in this compilation share lessons learned about power, privilege, and their meanings as they pertain to conducting research in and with urban settings. To this end, four primary objectives guide this manuscript: 1) To expand the conversation of urban school research to include multiple voices of culturally responsible, caring scholars with a professed commitment to using research as an empowering tool for urban educational contexts; 2) To provide practical accounts of what has and has not worked for individuals conducting both shortterm and longitudinal research in urban educational institutions and communities; 3) To demonstrate the (dis)connect between classroom discussions of urban education and reallife field experiences of researchers working in urban settings; and 4) To broaden discussions of reflexivity by analyzing the complex journey qualitative and quantitative sociologists, anthropologists, teacher educators, urban educators, and special educators experience while negotiating and creating collaborative relationships with urban educators, administrators, students, parents, and community members.



Who s Asking

Who s Asking Author Douglas L. Medin
ISBN-10 9780262026628
Release 2014-01-03
Pages 304
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Analysis and case studies show that including different orientations toward the natural world makes for more effective scientific practice and science education.



Schooling Hip Hop

Schooling Hip Hop Author Marc Lamont Hill
ISBN-10 9780807773567
Release 2015-04-26
Pages 193
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This book brings together veteran and emerging scholars from a variety of fields to chart new territory for hip-hop based education. Looking beyond rap music and the English language arts classroom, innovative chapters unpack the theory and practice of hip-hop based education in science, social studies, college composition, teacher education, and other fields. Authors consider not only the curricular aspects of hip-hop but also how its deeper aesthetics such as improvisational freestyling and competitive battling can shape teaching and learning in both secondary and higher education classrooms. Schooling Hip-Hop will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in a variety of educational settings. Contributors: Jacqueline Celemencki, Christopher Emdin, H. Bernard Hall, Decoteau J. Irby, Bronwen Low, Derek Pardue, James Braxton Peterson, David Stovall, Eloise Tan, and Joycelyn A. Wilson “Hip hop has come of age on the broader social and cultural scene. However, it is still in its infancy in the academy and school classrooms. Hill and Petchauer have assembled a powerful group of scholars who provide elegantly theoretical and practically significant ways to consider hip hop as an important pedagogical strategy. This volume is a wonderful reminder that ‘Stakes is high!’” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education, University of Wisconsin–Madison “This book is a bold, ambitious attempt to chart new intellectual, theoretical, and pedagogical directions for Hip-Hop Based Education. Hill and Petchauer are to be commended for pushing the envelope and stepping up to the challenge of taking HHBE to the next level.” —Geneva Smitherman, University Distinguished Professor Emerita, English and African American and African Studies, Michigan State University



What Is Education

What Is Education Author Philip W. Jackson
ISBN-10 9780226389394
Release 2011-11-07
Pages 136
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One day in 1938, John Dewey addressed a room of professional educators and urged them to take up the task of “finding out just what education is.” Reading this lecture in the late 1940s, Philip W. Jackson took Dewey’s charge to heart and spent the next sixty years contemplating his words. The stimulating result of a lifetime of thinking about educating, What Is Education? is a profound philosophical exploration of how we transmit knowledge in human society and how we think about accomplishing that vital task. Most contemporary approaches to education follow a strictly empirical track, aiming to discover pragmatic solutions for teachers and school administrators. Jackson argues that we need to learn not just how to improve on current practices but also how to think about what education means—in short, we need to answer Dewey by constantly rethinking education from the ground up. Guiding us through the many facets of Dewey’s comments, Jackson also calls on Hegel, Kant, and Paul Tillich to shed light on how a society does, can, and should transmit truth and knowledge to successive generations. Teasing out the implications in these thinkers’ works ultimately leads Jackson to the conclusion that education is at root a moral enterprise. At a time when schools increasingly serve as a battleground for ideological contests, What Is Education? is a stirring call to refocus our minds on what is for Jackson the fundamental goal of education: making students as well as teachers—and therefore everyone—better people.



The New Math

The New Math Author Christopher J. Phillips
ISBN-10 9780226185019
Release 2014-12-04
Pages 224
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An era of sweeping cultural change in America, the postwar years saw the rise of beatniks and hippies, the birth of feminism, and the release of the first video game. It was also the era of new math. Introduced to US schools in the late 1950s and 1960s, the new math was a curricular answer to Cold War fears of American intellectual inadequacy. In the age of Sputnik and increasingly sophisticated technological systems and machines, math class came to be viewed as a crucial component of the education of intelligent, virtuous citizens who would be able to compete on a global scale. In this history, Christopher J. Phillips examines the rise and fall of the new math as a marker of the period’s political and social ferment. Neither the new math curriculum designers nor its diverse legions of supporters concentrated on whether the new math would improve students’ calculation ability. Rather, they felt the new math would train children to think in the right way, instilling in students a set of mental habits that might better prepare them to be citizens of modern society—a world of complex challenges, rapid technological change, and unforeseeable futures. While Phillips grounds his argument in shifting perceptions of intellectual discipline and the underlying nature of mathematical knowledge, he also touches on long-standing debates over the place and relevance of mathematics in liberal education. And in so doing, he explores the essence of what it means to be an intelligent American—by the numbers.



The Brilliance of Black Children in Mathematics

The Brilliance of Black Children in Mathematics Author Jacqueline Leonard
ISBN-10 9781623960810
Release 2013-03-01
Pages 399
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This book is a critically important contribution to the work underway to transform schooling for students who have historically been denied access to a quality education, specifically African American children. The first section of the book provides some historical perspective critical to understanding the current state of education in the U.S., specifically for the education of African American children. The following sections include chapters on policy, learning, ethnomathematics, student identity, and teacher preparation as it relates to the mathematical education of Black children. Through offering “counternarratives” about mathematically successful Black youth, advocating for a curriculum that is grounded in African American culture and ways of thinking, providing shining examples of the brilliance of Blacks students, and promoting high expectations for all rather than situating students as the problem, the authors of this book provide powerful insights related to the teaching and learning of mathematics for African American students. As is made evident in this book, effective teaching involves much more than just engaging students in inquirybased pedagogy (Kitchen, 2003). The chapters offered in this book demonstrate how mathematics instruction for African American students needs to take into account historical marginalization and presentday policies that do harm to Black students (Kunjufu, 2005). Empowering mathematics instruction for African American students needs to take into consideration and promote students’ cultural, spiritual, and historical identities. Furthermore, mathematics instruction for African American students should create opportunities for students to express themselves and the needs of their communities as a means to promote social justice both within their classrooms and communities.



Studying Science Teacher Identity

Studying Science Teacher Identity Author Lucy Avraamidou
ISBN-10 9789463005289
Release 2016-04-11
Pages 332
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The overarching goal of this book volume is to illuminate how research on science teacher identity has deepened and complicated our understanding of the role of identity in examining teacher learning and development. The collective chapters, both theoretical and empirical, present an array of conceptual underpinnings that have been used to frame science teacher identity, document the various methodological approaches that researchers have implemented in order to study science teacher identity within various contexts, and offer empirical evidence about science teacher identity development. The findings of the studies presented in this volume support the argument that teacher identity is a dynamic, multidimensional and comprehensive construct, which provides a powerful lens for studying science teacher learning and development for various reasons. First, it pushes our boundaries by extending our definitions of science teacher learning and development as it proposes new ways of conceptualizing the processes of becoming a science teacher. Second, it emphasizes the role of the context on science teacher learning and development and pays attention to the experiences that teachers have as members of various communities. Third, it allows us to examine the impact of various sub-identities, personal histories, emotions, and social markers, such as ethnicity, race, and class, on science teachers’ identity development. The book aims at making a unique and deeply critical contribution to notions around science teacher identity by proposing fresh theoretical perspectives, providing empirical evidence about identity development, offering a set of implications for science teacher preparation, and recommending directions for future research.



Highlighting Homeschooling

Highlighting Homeschooling Author Bethany Gardiner
ISBN-10 9780983042013
Release 2011-06-01
Pages
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This guide will help you through every step of the homeschooling process, from making the initial choice to choosing a curriculum to launching your children successfully into college and beyond. Discover what has worked and what hasn't for other homeschooling families while you learn how to develop your own individual style. Allow your family to grow closer, learn how to deal with those who don't understand your choices, and find fulfillment in your role as the primary educator without losing yourself in the process.



Pacific CRYSTAL Centre for Science Mathematics and Technology Literacy Lessons Learned

Pacific CRYSTAL Centre for Science  Mathematics  and Technology Literacy  Lessons Learned Author Larry D. Yore
ISBN-10 9789460915062
Release 2011-10-25
Pages 267
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The University of Victoria Pacific Centre for Scientific and Technological Literacy is one of five Centres for Research into Youth, Science Teaching and Learning (CRYSTAL) funded for 5 years (2005–2010) by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Canada (NSERC). Pacific CRYSTAL intended to promote scientific, mathematical, and technological literacy for responsible citizenship through research partnerships with university and educational communities. Pacific CRYSTAL’s functional structure consisted of 3 research and development nodes connected to a leadership and administrative node, which was charged with facilitating the activities of 19 projects and 42 principal investigators, partners, and research associates. Node 1, an incubation centre, involved extracurricular authentic science, mathematics, and technology experiences; Node 2, a classroom testing environment, field-tested instructional ideas and strategies to develop evidence-based practices; and Node 3, lighthouse schools, involved systemic change and leadership opportunities that adapted, demonstrated, and disseminated tested ideas, resources, and strategies to a much broader education community and attempted to influence public policy. This book provides descriptions of the target goals, research and development projects, and lessons learned.