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Estates

Estates Author Lynsey Hanley
ISBN-10 1847087027
Release 2012
Pages 239
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Lynsey Hanley was born and raised just outside of Birmingham on what was then the largest council estate in Europe, and she has lived for years on an estate in London's East End. Writing with passion, humour and a sense of history, she recounts the rise of social housing a century ago, its adoption as a fundamental right by leaders of the social welfare state in the mid-century and its decline - as both idea and reality - in the 1960s and '70s. Throughout, Hanley focuses on how shifting trends in urban planning and changing government policies - from Homes Fit for Heroes to Le Corbusier's concrete tower blocks, to the Right to Buy - affected those so often left out of the argument over council estates: the millions of people who live on them. What emerges is a vivid mix of memoir and social history, an engaging and illuminating book about a corner of society that the rest of Britain has left in the dark.



Estates

Estates Author Lynsey Hanley
ISBN-10 1862079854
Release 2007
Pages 244
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Writing with passion, humour, and a sense of history, Lynsey Hanley recounts the rise of social housing a century ago, its adoption as a fundamental right by leaders of the social welfare state in mid-century and its decline - as both idea and reality - in the 1960s and 70s.



Respectable

Respectable Author Lynsey Hanley
ISBN-10 0141040610
Release 2017-02-23
Pages 256
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"Society is often talked about as a ladder, from which you can climb from bottom to top. The walls are less talked about. This book is about how people try to get over them, whether they manage to or not. In autumn 1992, growing up on a vast Birmingham estate, the sixteen-year-old Lynsey Hanley went to sixth-form college. She knew that it would change her life, but was entirely unprepared for the price she would have to pay- to leave behind her working-class world and become middle class. In this empathic, wry and passionate exploration of class in Britain today, Lynsey Hanley looks at how people are kept apart, and keep themselves apart - and the costs involved in the journey from 'there' to 'here'."



Getting By

Getting By Author Mckenzie, Lisa
ISBN-10 9781447309956
Release 2015-01-14
Pages 224
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While the 1% rule, poor neighbourhoods have become the subject of public concern and media scorn, blamed for society's ills. This unique book redresses the balance. Lisa Mckenzie lived on the St AnnÕs estate in Nottingham for more than 20 years. Her ÔinsiderÕ status enables us to hear the stories of its residents, often wary of outsiders. St Ann's has been stigmatised as a place where gangs, guns, drugs, single mothers and those unwilling or unable to make something of their lives reside. Yet in this same community we find strong, resourceful, ambitious people who are 'getting by', often with humour and despite facing brutal austerity.



Municipal Dreams

Municipal Dreams Author John Boughton
ISBN-10 9781784787424
Release 2018-05-15
Pages 336
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A narrative history of council housing—from slums to the Grenfell Tower Urgent, timely and compelling, Municipal Dreams brilliantly brings the national story of housing to life. In this landmark reappraisal of council housing, historian John Boughton presents an alternative history of Britain. Rooted in the ambition to end slum living, and the ideals of those who would build a new society, Municipal Dreams looks at how the state’s duty to house its people decently became central to our politics. The book makes it clear why that legacy and its promise should be defended. Traversing the nation in this comprehensive social, political and architectural history of council housing, Boughton offers a tour of some of the best and most remarkable of our housing estates—some happily ordinary, some judged notorious. He asks us to understand their complex story and to rethink our prejudices. His accounts include extraordinary planners and architects who wished to elevate working men and women through design; the competing ideologies that have promoted state housing and condemned it; the economic factors that have always constrained our housing ideals; the crisis wrought by Right to Buy; and the evolving controversies around regeneration. Boughton shows how losing the dream of good housing has weakened our community and hurt its most vulnerable—as was seen most catastrophically in the fire at Grenfell Tower.



Life on the Russian Country Estate

Life on the Russian Country Estate Author Priscilla R. Roosevelt
ISBN-10 9780300072624
Release 1997-09-01
Pages 384
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This lavishly illustrated book is the first in any language to explore fully the vanished world of the Russian country estate. Russian studies scholar Priscilla Roosevelt brings to life these magnificent aristocratic dwellings, discussing their origins, design, and decoration; the social, family, and cultural life within their walls; and their demise after the 1917 revolution. 72 color & 158 b&w illustrations.



Council Housing and Culture

Council Housing and Culture Author Alison Ravetz
ISBN-10 9781134553730
Release 2003-12-16
Pages 272
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Born of idealism, and once an icon of the Labour movement and pillar of the Welfare State, council housing is now nearing its end. But do its many failings outweigh its positive contributions to public health and wellbeing? Alison Ravetz here provides the first comprehensive and apolitical history from which to arrive at a balanced judgement. Drawing on the widest possible evidence, from tenant and government records to the built environment itself, she tells the story of British council housing, from its seeds in Victorian reactions to 'the Poor', in philanthropy and model villages, Christian and other varieties of socialism. Her depiction of council housing in its mature years shows the often bizarre persistence of 'utopian' attitudes (whether in architectural design or management styles); its rise to a monopoly position in working-class family housing; the many compromises consequent on its state finance and local authority control; and the impact on working-class lives as an intellectuals' 'utopian dream' was converted into a social policy for the masses.



Remaking London

Remaking London Author Ben Campkin
ISBN-10 9780857722720
Release 2013-08-13
Pages 256
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Contemporary urban regeneration seeks to encourage diverse, creative new neighbourhoods that are rich in economic potential. Yet the end result frequently displaces precisely those qualities, activities and communities it claims to engender. Are people best served by a preoccupation with regeneration as economic growth? In The Regeneration Game Ben Campkin provides a lucid and wide-ranging critique of contemporary regeneration. Focusing on present-day regeneration areas in London that are key to the capital’s modern identity, including the site of the 2012 Olympics, the result is both a compelling account of contested sites within the capital’s recent history and a powerful critique of modern methods of urban regeneration.



Armchair Nation

Armchair Nation Author Joe Moran
ISBN-10 9781847654441
Release 2013-08-22
Pages 464
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But what does your furniture point at?' asks the character Joey in the sitcom Friends on hearing an acquaintance has no TV. It's a good question: since its beginnings during WW2, television has assumed a central role in our houses and our lives, just as satellite dishes and aerials have become features of urban skylines. Television (or 'the idiot's lantern', depending on your feelings about it) has created controversy, brought coronations and World Cups into living rooms, allowed us access to 24hr news and media and provided a thousand conversation starters. As shows come and go in popularity, the history of television shows us how our society has changed. Armchair Nation reveals the fascinating, lyrical and sometimes surprising history of telly, from the first demonstration of television by John Logie Baird (in Selfridges) to the fear and excitement that greeted its arrival in households (some viewers worried it might control their thoughts), the controversies of Mary Whitehouse's 'Clean Up TV' campaign and what JG Ballard thought about Big Brother. Via trips down memory lane with Morecambe and Wise, Richard Dimbleby, David Frost, Blue Peter and Coronation Street, you can flick between fascinating nuggets from the strange side of TV: what happened after a chimpanzee called 'Fred J. Muggs' interrupted American footage of the Queen's wedding, and why aliens might be tuning in to The Benny Hill Show.



If Walls Could Talk

If Walls Could Talk Author Lucy Worsley
ISBN-10 9780802712721
Release 2012-02-28
Pages 368
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"Worsley is a thoughtful, charming, often hilarious guide to life as it was lived, from the mundane to the esoteric.” -The Boston Globe Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up? When were the two "dirty centuries”? Why, for centuries, did rich people fear fruit? In her brilliantly and creatively researched book, Lucy Worsley takes us through the bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen, covering the history of each room and exploring what people actually did in bed, in the bath, at the table, and at the stove-from sauce stirring to breast-feeding, teeth cleaning to masturbating, getting dressed to getting married-providing a compelling account of how the four rooms of the home have evolved from medieval times to today, charting revolutionary changes in society.



Cavalier

Cavalier Author Lucy Worsley
ISBN-10 1596919418
Release 2008-12-20
Pages 352
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William Cavendish embodied the popular image of a cavalier. He was both courageous and cultured. His passions were architecture, horses, and women. And, along with the whole courtly world of King Charles I and his cavaliers, he was doomed to failure. Cavendish was a master of manège (the art of teaching horses to dance) and obsessed with building beautiful houses in the latest style. He taught Charles I's son to ride, and was the general of the king's army in the north during the Civil War. Famously defeated at the Battle of Marston Moor in 1644, he went into a long continental exile before returning to England in triumph upon the restoration of King Charles II to the throne in 1660. This is the story of one remarkable man, but it is also a rich evocation of what sustained him-his elaborate household. Lucy Worsley brings to life the complex and fascinating hierarchies among the inhabitants of the great houses of the seventeenth century, painting a picture of conspiracy, sexual intrigue, clandestine marriage, and gossip. From Ben Jonson and Anthony Van Dyck to long-forgotten servants, Cavalier recreates the cacophony, stink, ceremony, and splendor of the stately home and its inhabitants.



Urban Nightmares

Urban Nightmares Author
ISBN-10 1452908699
Release 2006
Pages 372
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Urban Nightmares has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Urban Nightmares also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Urban Nightmares book for free.



Chateau Country

Chateau Country Author Daniel Dekalb Miller
ISBN-10 0764344153
Release 2013
Pages 272
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Originally from France, the du Pont family settled in the Brandywine River Valley. Chateau Country is an intimate portrait of the houses built by this Delaware dynasty. Their first dwelling was a modest six-room house just steps from the gunpowder mills that made the du Ponts wealthy. One hundred years later, their largest house had 176 rooms and thirty-six servants on 2,300 acres of land. Since company founder E.I. du Pont built Eleutherian Mills in 1802, almost one hundred houses have been built nearby and occupied by his descendants. Many spectacular estate houses have been razed, but thirty-three du Pont family properties that still exist are explored and accompanied by anecdotes. Some, including Eleutherian Mills, Longwood, Gibraltar, Nemours, and Winterthur, are open to the public; others remain hidden behind stone walls. Chateau Country takes readers inside these houses and describes a way of life that has all but disappeared.



An Ordinary Marriage

An Ordinary Marriage Author Katherine Pickering Antonova
ISBN-10 9780199796991
Release 2013-01-10
Pages 304
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Based on diaries and letters by a husband, wife, and son, this book examines the Chikhachev family's social life, reading habits, attitudes toward illness and death, as well as gendered marital roles and their reception of the major ideas of their time: domesticity, Enlightenment, sentimentalism, and Romanticism.



The Adventures of Owen Hatherley In The Post Soviet Space

The Adventures of Owen Hatherley In The Post Soviet Space Author Owen Hatherley
ISBN-10 9781912248278
Release 2018-10-16
Pages 240
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Nearly thirty years after the fall of the USSR, the word "Soviet" should be as meaningless by now as "Hapsburg" or "Hohenzollern". Strangely, though, it endures, as places both inside and outside the former Soviet Union define themselves for or against what happened when it existed. But does that experience mean anything today, or is it just an enormous cul-de-sac? This book tries to find out, through an itinerary that goes from the Baltic to Belarus, from Ukraine to the Urals, from the Caucasus to Central Asia, and in cities that range from nuclear new towns of the Fifties to gleaming new capitals of the 21st century. In this Eurasian post-Soviet space, we try to find the continuities with Communism - if there are any - and the remnants of revolutions both distant and recent. Instead of a wistful journey through ruins, this intends to be an engaged travelogue, a subjective, personal Marxist Humanist guidebook to somewhere that actually exists, but which is constantly haunted by what it didn't become, whether a real Communist utopia or a successful or fair capitalism. In the course of this transcontinental account of what used to be the Soviet Union and is now a patchwork of EU democracies, neoliberal dictatorships and Soviet nostalgic enclaves (often found in the same countries) we might just find the outlines of a way of building cities that is a powerful alternative, both in the past and present.



Landscapes of Communism

Landscapes of Communism Author Owen Hatherley
ISBN-10 9781620971895
Release 2016-03-01
Pages 624
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When communism took power in Eastern Europe it remade cities in its own image, transforming everyday life and creating sweeping boulevards and vast, epic housing estates in an emphatic declaration of a noncapitalist idea. The regimes that built them are now dead and long gone, but from Warsaw to Berlin, Moscow to postrevolutionary Kiev, the buildings remain, often populated by people whose lives were scattered by the collapse of communism. Landscapes of Communism is a journey of historical discovery, plunging us into the lost world of socialist architecture. Owen Hatherley, a brilliant, witty, young urban critic shows how power was wielded in these societies by tracing the sharp, sudden zigzags of official communist architectural style: the superstitious despotic rococo of high Stalinism, with its jingoistic memorials, palaces, and secret policemen’s castles; East Germany’s obsession with prefabricated concrete panels; and the metro systems of Moscow and Prague, a spectacular vindication of public space that went further than any avant-garde ever dared. Throughout his journeys across the former Soviet empire, Hatherley asks what, if anything, can be reclaimed from the ruins of Communism—what residue can inform our contemporary ideas of urban life?



The Biggest Estate on Earth

The Biggest Estate on Earth Author Bill Gammage
ISBN-10 9781743311325
Release 2012
Pages 434
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Reveals the complex, country-wide systems of land management used by Aboriginal people in presettlement Australia Across Australia, early Europeans commented again and again that the land looked like a park, with extensive grassy patches and pathways, open woodlands, and abundant wildlife. Bill Gammage has discovered this was because Aboriginal people managed the land in a far more systematic and scientific fashion than most people have ever realized. For more than a decade, he has examined written and visual records of the Australian landscape. He has uncovered an extraordinarily complex system of land management using fire, the life cycles of native plants, and the natural flow of water to ensure plentiful wildlife and plant foods throughout the year. Aboriginal people spent far less time and effort than Europeans in securing food and shelter, and this book reveals how. Once Aboriginal people were no longer able to tend their country, it became overgrown and vulnerable to the hugely damaging bushfires Australians now experience. With details of land-management strategies from around Australia, this book rewrites the history of the continent, with huge implications for today.