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Fair Labor Lawyer

Fair Labor Lawyer Author Marlene Trestman
ISBN-10 9780807162101
Release 2016-03-01
Pages 280
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Through a life that spanned every decade of the twentieth century, Supreme Court advocate Bessie Margolin shaped modern American labor policy while creating a place for female lawyers in the nation's highest courts. Despite her beginnings in an orphanage and her rare position as a southern, Jewish woman pursuing a legal profession, Margolin became an important and influential Supreme Court advocate. In this comprehensive biography, Marlene Trestman reveals the forces that propelled and the obstacles that impeded Margolin's remarkable journey, illuminating the life of this trailblazing woman. Raised in the Jewish Orphans' Home in New Orleans, Margolin received an extraordinary education at the Isidore Newman Manual Training School. Both institutions stressed that good citizenship, hard work, and respect for authority could help people achieve economic security and improve their social status. Adopting these values, Margolin used her intellect and ambition, along with her femininity and considerable southern charm, to win the respect of her classmates, colleagues, bosses, and judges -- almost all of whom were men. In her career she worked with some of the most brilliant legal professionals in America. A graduate of Tulane and Yale Law Schools, Margolin launched her career in the early 1930s, when only 2 percent of America's attorneys were female, and far fewer were Jewish and from the South. According to Trestman, Margolin worked hard to be treated as "one of the boys." For the sake of her career, she eschewed marriage -- but not romance -- and valued collegial relationships, never shying from a late-night brief-writing session or a poker game. But her personal relationships never eclipsed her numerous professional accomplishments, among them defending the constitutionality of the New Deal's Tennessee Valley Authority, drafting rules establishing the American military tribunals for Nazi war crimes in Nuremberg, and, on behalf of the Labor Department, shepherding through the courts the child labor, minimum wage, and overtime protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. A founding member of that National Organization for Women, Margolin culminated her government service as a champion of the Equal Pay Act, arguing and winning the first appeals. Margolin's passion for her work and focus on meticulous preparation resulted in an outstanding record in appellate advocacy, both in number of cases and rate of success. By prevailing in 21 of her 24 Supreme Court arguments Margolin shares the elite company of only a few dozen women and men who attained such high standing as Supreme Court advocates.



Long Past Slavery

Long Past Slavery Author Catherine A. Stewart
ISBN-10 9781469626277
Release 2016-02-05
Pages 372
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From 1936 to 1939, the New Deal's Federal Writers' Project collected life stories from more than 2,300 former African American slaves. These narratives are now widely used as a source to understand the lived experience of those who made the transition from slavery to freedom. But in this examination of the project and its legacy, Catherine A. Stewart shows it was the product of competing visions of the past, as ex-slaves' memories of bondage, emancipation, and life as freedpeople were used to craft arguments for and against full inclusion of African Americans in society. Stewart demonstrates how project administrators, such as the folklorist John Lomax; white and black interviewers, including Zora Neale Hurston; and the ex-slaves themselves fought to shape understandings of black identity. She reveals that some influential project employees were also members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, intent on memorializing the Old South. Stewart places ex-slaves at the center of debates over black citizenship to illuminate African Americans' struggle to redefine their past as well as their future in the face of formidable opposition. By shedding new light on a critically important episode in the history of race, remembrance, and the legacy of slavery in the United States, Stewart compels readers to rethink a prominent archive used to construct that history.



Closing the Courthouse Door

Closing the Courthouse Door Author Erwin Chemerinsky
ISBN-10 9780300224900
Release 2017-01-10
Pages 256
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A leading legal scholar explores how the constitutional right to seek justice has been restricted by the Supreme Court The Supreme Court s decisions on constitutional rights are well known and much talked about. But individuals who want to defend those rights need something else as well: access to courts that can rule on their complaints. And on matters of access, the Court s record over the past generation has been almost uniformly hostile to the enforcement of individual citizens constitutional rights. The Court has restricted who has standing to sue, expanded the immunity of governments and government workers, limited the kinds of cases the federal courts can hear, and restricted the right of habeas corpus. Closing the Courthouse Door, by the distinguished legal scholar Erwin Chemerinsky, is the first book to show the effect of these decisions: taken together, they add up to a growing limitation on citizens ability to defend their rights under the Constitution. Using many stories of people whose rights have been trampled yet who had no legal recourse, Chemerinsky argues that enforcing the Constitution should be the federal courts primary purpose, and they should not be barred from considering any constitutional question.



Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers

Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers Author Jill Norgren
ISBN-10 9781479865963
Release 2018-05-22
Pages 304
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The captivating story of how a diverse group of women, including Janet Reno and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, broke the glass ceiling and changed the modern legal profession In Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers, award-winning legal historian Jill Norgren curates the oral histories of one hundred extraordinary American women lawyers who changed the profession of law. Many of these stories are being told for the first time. As adults these women were on the front lines fighting for access to law schools and good legal careers. They challenged established rules and broke the law’s glass ceiling.Norgren uses these interviews to describe the profound changes that began in the late 1960s, interweaving social and legal history with the women’s individual experiences. In 1950, when many of the subjects of this book were children, the terms of engagement were clear: only a few women would be admitted each year to American law schools and after graduation their professional opportunities would never equal those open to similarly qualified men. Harvard Law School did not even begin to admit women until 1950. At many law schools, well into the 1970s, men told female students that they were taking a place that might be better used by a male student who would have a career, not babies. In 2005 the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession initiated a national oral history project named the Women Trailblazers in the Law initiative: One hundred outstanding senior women lawyers were asked to give their personal and professional histories in interviews conducted by younger colleagues. The interviews, made available to the author, permit these women to be written into history in their words, words that evoke pain as well as celebration, humor, and somber reflection. These are women attorneys who, in courtrooms, classrooms, government agencies, and NGOs have rattled the world with insistent and successful demands to reshape their profession and their society. They are women who brought nothing short of a revolution to the profession of law.



The New Deal Lawyers

The New Deal Lawyers Author Peter H. Irons
ISBN-10 0691000824
Release 1993
Pages 351
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From the perspective of young lawyers in three key New Deal agencies, this book traces the path of crucial constitutional test cases during the years from 1933 to 1937.From the perspective of young lawyers in three key New Deal agencies, this book traces the path of crucial constitutional test cases during the years from 1933 to 1937.



A Difficult Woman

A Difficult Woman Author Alice Kessler-Harris
ISBN-10 9781608193790
Release 2012-04-30
Pages 448
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Lillian Hellman was a giant of twentieth-century letters and a groundbreaking figure as one of the most successful female playwrights on Broadway. Yet the author of The Little Foxes and Toys in the Attic is today remembered more as a toxic, bitter survivor and literary fabulist, the woman of whom Mary McCarthy said, "Every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the.'" In A Difficult Woman, renowned historian Alice Kessler-Harris undertakes a feat few would dare to attempt: a reclamation of a combative, controversial woman who straddled so many political and cultural fault lines of her time. Kessler-Harris renders Hellman's feisty wit and personality in all of its contradictions: as a non-Jewish Jew, a displaced Southerner, a passionate political voice without a party, an artist immersed in commerce, a sexually free woman who scorned much of the women's movement, a loyal friend whose trust was often betrayed, and a writer of memoirs who repeatedly questioned the possibility of achieving truth and doubted her memory. Hellman was a writer whose plays spoke the language of morality yet whose achievements foundered on accusations of mendacity. Above all else, she was a woman who made her way in a man's world. Kessler-Harris has crafted a nuanced life of Hellman, empathetic yet unsparing, that situates her in the varied contexts in which she moved, from New Orleans to Broadway to the hearing room of HUAC. A Difficut Woman is a major work of literary and intellectual history. This will be one of the most reviewed, and most acclaimed, books of 2012.



Health Promotion and Aging

Health Promotion and Aging Author David Haber
ISBN-10 9780826199171
Release 2013-03-26
Pages 536
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Print+CourseSmart



Abe Fortas a Biography

Abe Fortas  a Biography Author Laura Kalman
ISBN-10 0300173695
Release 1990
Pages 499
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Abe Fortas a Biography has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Abe Fortas a Biography also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Abe Fortas a Biography book for free.



City of quartz

City of quartz Author Mike Davis
ISBN-10 0679738061
Release 1992
Pages 462
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This new edition of Mike Davis's visionary work gives an update on Los Angeles as the city hits the 21st century.



Woman Lawyer

Woman Lawyer Author Barbara Babcock
ISBN-10 9780804779357
Release 2011-01-05
Pages 392
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Woman Lawyer tells the story of Clara Foltz, the first woman admitted to the California Bar. Famous in her time as a public intellectual, leader of the women's movement, and legal reformer, Foltz faced terrific prejudice and well-organized opposition to women lawyers as she tried cases in front of all-male juries, raised five children as a single mother, and stumped for political candidates. She was the first to propose the creation of a public defender to balance the public prosecutor. Woman Lawyer uncovers the legal reforms and societal contributions of a woman celebrated in her day, but lost to history until now. It casts new light on the turbulent history and politics of California in a period of phenomenal growth and highlights the interconnection of the suffragists and other movements for civil rights and legal reforms.



Slices of Life

Slices of Life Author Leah Eskin
ISBN-10 9780762453139
Release 2014-04-01
Pages 400
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For nearly a decade, Leah Eskin has been serving up chronicles of everyday life, along with mouthwatering recipes, to the readers of her “Home on the Range” column in the Chicago Tribune. Now she has whipped up Slice of Life, a collection of her columns covering everything from her early married days to parenting adolescents—and everything in between. From “Best Friend Biscuits” to “Recovery Paella” to “Sullen Child Oatmeal Squares,” there's always a recipe to cope with life's sticky situations: the dinner party gone awry, the mortifying soccer match, the houseguest who eats nothing, the teenager who won't listen. She tells the story of family life through its ordinary disasters—and pleasures. Slice of a Life is both a charming memoir told through food, and with more than 200 recipes, it's also a delectable cookbook that will enchant anyone who appreciates the big and little moments of life.



Margaret Sanger

Margaret Sanger Author Jean H. Baker
ISBN-10 9781429968973
Release 2011-11-08
Pages 368
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Undoubtedly the most influential advocate for birth control even before the term existed, Margaret Sanger ignited a movement that has shaped our society to this day. Her views on reproductive rights have made her a frequent target of conservatives and so-called family values activists. Yet lately even progressives have shied away from her, citing socialist leanings and a purported belief in eugenics as a blight on her accomplishments. In this captivating new biography, the renowned feminist historian Jean H. Baker rescues Sanger from such critiques and restores her to the vaunted place in history she once held. Trained as a nurse and midwife in the gritty tenements of New York's Lower East Side, Sanger grew increasingly aware of the dangers of unplanned pregnancy—both physical and psychological. A botched abortion resulting in the death of a poor young mother catalyzed Sanger, and she quickly became one of the loudest voices in favor of sex education and contraception. The movement she started spread across the country, eventually becoming a vast international organization with her as its spokeswoman. Sanger's staunch advocacy for women's privacy and freedom extended to her personal life as well. After becoming a wife and mother at a relatively early age, she abandoned the trappings of home and family for a globe-trotting life as a women's rights activist. Notorious for the sheer number of her romantic entanglements, Sanger epitomized the type of "free love" that would become mainstream only at the very end of her life. That she lived long enough to see the creation of the birth control pill—which finally made planned pregnancy a reality—is only fitting.



Louis D Brandeis

Louis D  Brandeis Author Melvin Urofsky
ISBN-10 9780805211955
Release 2012-09-04
Pages 955
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A full-scale portrait of the early twentieth-century Supreme Court justice seeks to distinguish his personal life from his achievements as a reformer and jurist, offering additional insight into his role in the development of pro bono legal services, the creations of the Federal Reserve Act and other key legislations, and his contributions to American-Jewish affairs as a practicing Zionist.



Because of Sex

Because of Sex Author Gillian Thomas
ISBN-10 9781250138088
Release 2017-08-08
Pages 304
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A compelling look at ten of the most important Supreme Court cases defining women’s rights on the job, as told by the brave women who brought the cases to court



Right Star Rising A New Politics 1974 1980

Right Star Rising  A New Politics  1974 1980 Author Laura Kalman
ISBN-10 9780393076387
Release 2010-06-28
Pages 473
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This narrative history of the Ford-Carter years discusses the relevance of the period's politics on today's issues and its shaping of the current political environment, including the energy crisis, a sharp economic downturn and a collision with fundamentalism in Iran.



Roots

Roots Author Alex Haley
ISBN-10 9780306824869
Release 2016-05-03
Pages 912
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A new eight-hour event series based on Roots will be simulcast on the History Channel, Lifetime, and A&E over four consecutive nights beginning Memorial Day, May 30, 2016 When Roots was first published forty years ago, the book electrified the nation: it received a Pulitzer Prize and was a #1 New York Times bestseller for 22 weeks. The celebrated miniseries that followed a year later was a coast–to–coast event—over 130 million Americans watched some or all of the broadcast. In the four decades since then, the story of the young African slave Kunta Kinte and his descendants has lost none of its power to enthrall and provoke. Now, Roots once again bursts onto the national scene, and at a time when the race conversation has never been more charged. It is a book for the legions of earlier readers to revisit and for a new generation to discover. To quote from the introduction by Michael Eric Dyson: “Alex Haley's Roots is unquestionably one of the nation's seminal texts. It affected events far beyond its pages and was a literary North Star…. Each generation must make up its own mind about how it will navigate the treacherous waters of our nation's racial sin. And each generation must overcome our social ills through greater knowledge and decisive action. Roots is a stirring reminder that we can achieve these goals only if we look history squarely in the face.” The star– studded cast in this new event series includes Academy Award–winners Forest Whitaker and Anna Paquin, Laurence Fishburne, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Derek Luke, Grammy Award-winner Tip “T.I.” Harris, and Mekhi Phifer. Questlove of The Roots is the executive music producer for the miniseries's stirring soundtrack.



The Secret Behind Communism

The Secret Behind Communism Author David Duke
ISBN-10 1892796015
Release 2013-07-15
Pages 288
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This is the most unified work on the ethnic origins of the Communist Revolution in Russia and the greatest Holocaust in the history of mankind. It documents the ethnic tribalism that drove Soviet Communism and and the Communist Internationale. This book shows how a Zionist publication, YNETNEWS, identifies Genrikh Yagoda as the Soviet leader who murdered at least 10 million people. He killed twice the number of victims alleged in the Jewish Holocaust but not one in a thousand people know of him. Dr. Duke argues that the media silence is related to what YNETNEWS reveals to its readers in Israel: Yagoda and his deputies were Jews. That Hollywood and the media conglomerates which hide the crimes of Communism are in fact dominated by the same tribal loyalties. Dr. Duke documents the Jewish role in Communism from its germination with Karl Marx and Moses Hess to the seizure of Russia and Eastern Europe and its satellite organizations in America and Britain, South Africa and even in early Communist China. The Secret Behind Communism incorporates the research of the author along with Nobel prizewinner Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Frank Britton and others. The great Russian patriot Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn who himself suffered greatly in the Jewish-run Gulags, stated these powerful words: "You must understand. The leading Bolsheviks who took over Russia were not Russians. They hated Russians. They Hated Christians. Driven by ethnic hatred they tortured and slaughtered millions of Russians without a shred of human remorse..." This book brings the historical evidence together. It has key translations from Solzhenitsyn's book Two Hundred Years Together, a book never translated into English by the globalist media. Dr. Duke reveals that Jewish tribalist support for Communism has subsumed into Zionism. Jewish Trotskyite remnants have heavily influence progressive, and surprisingly, even conservative expressions through the neoconservatism that Trotskyites such as Leo Strauss, founded. It further shows that the same ethnic tribalist, genocidal mindset in Communism is present in Zionism and globalism and is just as much an enemy and threat to human rights and life as historical Soviet Communism.