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Financing Failure

Financing Failure Author Vern McKinley
ISBN-10 1598130498
Release 2011
Pages 381
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Probably no issue during the most recent financial crisis aroused more passion than financial institution bailouts. Focusing on the policymaking behind the decisions to bail out these institutions—not just during the most recent crisis, but also throughout history—this account argues that the genesis of financial crisis lies in government policy, whether in the mismanagement of monetary policy during the 1930s or in the extraordinary push of consumers into homeownership leading up to the current crisis. This detailed analysis is an essential read in order to understand why the United States has become so reliant on such interventions.



Transforming the U S Financial System An Equitable and Efficient Structure for the 21st Century

Transforming the U S  Financial System  An Equitable and Efficient Structure for the 21st Century Author Gary Dymski
ISBN-10 9781315484518
Release 2016-09-16
Pages 288
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This work challenges the conventional understanding of Hong Kong's political culture as one of indifference. It takes a historical look at political participation in the former colony and includes an in-depth analysis of 13 selected cases.



Too Big to Fail

Too Big to Fail Author Financial Management Association International. Meeting
ISBN-10 1567206212
Release 2004
Pages 359
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Explores the reasons why some companies or organizations are considered "too big to fail" by their governments, and why others are not.



Fixing Financial Crises in the 21st Century

Fixing Financial Crises in the 21st Century Author Andrew Haldane
ISBN-10 9781134337156
Release 2004-08-02
Pages 368
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Financial crises have dogged the international monetary system over recent years. They have impoverished millions of people around the world, especially within developing countries. And they have called into question the very process of globalization. Yet there remains no intellectual consensus on how best to avert such crises, much less resolve them. Policymakers stand at a cross-roads. This volume summarises and evaluates these issues, drawing on contributions by prominent international experts in the field.



From Buildings and Loans to Bail Outs

From Buildings and Loans to Bail Outs Author David L. Mason
ISBN-10 1139453807
Release 2004-07-05
Pages
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For most Americans, the savings and loan industry is defined by the fraud, ineptitude and failures of the 1980s. However, these events overshadow a long history in which thrifts played a key role in helping thousands of households buy homes. First appearing in the 1830s savings and loans, then known as building and loans, encourage their working-class members to adhere to the principles of thrift and mutual co-operation as a way to achieve the 'American Dream' of home ownership. This book traces the development of this industry from its origins as a movement of a loosely affiliated collection of institutions into a major element of America's financial markets. It also analyses how diverse groups of Americans, including women, ethnic Americans and African Americans, used thrifts to improve their lives and elevate their positions in society. Finally the overall historical perspective sheds new light on the events of the 1980s and analyses the efforts to rehabilitate the industry in the 1990s.



Bailouts

Bailouts Author Robert Eric Wright
ISBN-10 9780231150552
Release 2010
Pages 147
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Today's financial crisis is the result of dismal failures on the part of regulators, market analysts, and corporate executives. Yet the response of the American government has been to bail out the very institutions and individuals that have wrought such havoc upon the nation. Are such massive bailouts really called for? Can they succeed? Robert E. Wright and his colleagues provide an unbiased history of government bailouts and a frank assessment of their effectiveness. Their book recounts colonial America's struggle to rectify the first dangerous real estate bubble and the British government's counterproductive response. It explains how Alexander Hamilton allowed central banks and other lenders to bail out distressed but sound businesses without rewarding or encouraging the risky ones. And it shows how, in the second half of the twentieth century, governments began to bail out distressed companies, industries, and even entire economies in ways that subsidized risk takers while failing to reinvigorate the economy. By peering into the historical uses of public money to save private profit, this volume suggests better ways to control risk in the future. Additional Columbia / SSRC books on the privatization of risk and its implications for Americans: Health at Risk: America's Ailing Health System--and How to Heal ItEdited by Jacob S. Hacker Laid Off, Laid Low: Political and Economic Consequences of Employment InsecurityEdited by Katherine S. Newman Pensions, Social Security, and the Privatization of RiskEdited by Mitchell A. Orenstein



Why Government Can Never Fix a Down Economy

Why Government Can Never Fix a Down Economy Author Tom Shipley
ISBN-10 9781478718857
Release 2012-12-19
Pages 135
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A down economy occurs when too many businesses see incoming orders shrink too much. But always, among the 29 million firms that comprise our marketplace, some businesses will be doing well. In the past, we devised a way to find them, fund them, and begin the healing process. Nobody knows, regardless of studies or the number of degrees held, who those firms or business sectors, in aggregate, are. But our government, invariably, selects some, presents them with tax money as stimulus, and the economy continues to sleep. The money was wasted and no national or market purpose was served. Citizen-households, in dealing with all 29 million businesses, unintentionally are funding those poised for growth -- and at no cost to taxpayers. The private sector has 132 million citizen-households that spend money to buy an infinite variety of products or services, every day, that they need or desire from those businesses. And that money, secondarily, is finding all of the firms peculiarly poised for growth and is feeding them. With time, the market will heal and grow if government does nothing. But government can shorten the period of distress: Remove business-retarding regulations. And it can shorten it much further if the private sector, additionally, is allowed to retain a little more of its tax money -- to further stimulate those poised. To make the nation’s period of economic distress the absolute shortest, the government has to do this: Give all private sector businesses more money (lower tax rates with no time limit), remove any regulatory stumbling blocks to business (for example, let drilling begin on federal land), give the private citizens more money to spend (lower tax rates with no time limit), and stand back. The widespread distribution of funding will find those elements that are poised for growth, and if enough elements are found, the correction will begin - and continue, like the falling of dominoes. Government can’t do anything more. If the market isn’t ready, it may take more time, and permanence of all the actions is required. Today, world-wide, economies are in turmoil; our consumers’ money could find some businesses, poised, that left for foreign shores early on, now ready to return.



Strategic management of financial institutions survival in 21st century

Strategic management of financial institutions survival in 21st century Author Institute of Bankers, Pakistan
ISBN-10 UOM:39015073604103
Release 2006
Pages 200
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Strategic management of financial institutions survival in 21st century has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Strategic management of financial institutions survival in 21st century also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Strategic management of financial institutions survival in 21st century book for free.



Revitalizing Marxist Theory for Today s Capitalism

Revitalizing Marxist Theory for Today s Capitalism Author Paul Zarembka
ISBN-10 9781780522555
Release 2011-11-07
Pages 300
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Amidst a capitalist crisis that has upturned mainstream orthodoxies, this title underscores the importance of historical and materialist understandings of capitalist economies. It exposes the limitations of neoclassical economics' endogenous growth theory and how it, in fact, gropes for understandings well established within Marxism.



When Government Helped

When Government Helped Author Sheila D. Collins
ISBN-10 9780199990719
Release 2013-10-25
Pages 288
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When Government Helped systematically evaluates some parallels between The Great Depression and the 2007-2008 global economic meltdown, not only in terms of their economic causes and consequences, but also in terms of their political and cultural contexts and the environmental crises that afflict both periods. The positive and negative lessons for contemporary policy-making are evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of authors across a range of policy arenas. This book is a unique blend of disciplines that presents a new set of guideposts--some beneficial, some cautionary--for the future.



Black Box Casino How Wall Street s Risky Shadow Banking Crashed Global Finance

Black Box Casino  How Wall Street s Risky Shadow Banking Crashed Global Finance Author Robert Stowe England
ISBN-10 9780313392900
Release 2011-09-12
Pages 250
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This cautionary tale explains how the murky and complex world of mortgage finance caused a global market meltdown—and offers new insights on how to create a stronger world of banking and mortgage finance. • Charts and graphs • A bibliography



Bad Money

Bad Money Author Kevin Phillips
ISBN-10 9781101046326
Release 2009-03-31
Pages 352
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In his acclaimed book American Theocracy, Kevin Phillips warned of the perilous interaction of debt, financial recklessness, and the spiking cost (and growing scarcity) of oil- warnings that are proving to be frighteningly accurate. Now, in his most significant and timely book yet, Phillips takes the full measure of this crisis. They are a part of what he calls "bad money"- not just the depreciated dollar, but also the dangerous attitudes and the flawed products of wayward mega-finance. His devastating conclusion: In its hubris, the financial sector has hijacked the American economy and put our very global future at risk-and it may be too late to stop it.



Interpreting Keynes for the 21st century

Interpreting Keynes for the 21st century Author Paul Davidson
ISBN-10 0230520901
Release 2007
Pages 314
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This book presents the fourth volume of the collected writings of Paul Davidson.



American Finance for the 21st Century

American Finance for the 21st Century Author Robert E. Litan
ISBN-10 0815705360
Release 2010-12-01
Pages 211
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As recently as thirty years ago, Americans lived in a financial world that today seems distant. Investment and borrowing choices were meager: virtually all transactions were conducted in cash or by check. The financial services industry was heavily regulated, as an outgrowth of the Depression, while an elaborate safety net was constructed to prevent a repeat of that dismal episode in American history. Today, consumers and businesses have a dizzying array of choices about where to invest and borrow. Plastic credit cards and electronic transfers increasingly are replacing cash and checks. Much regulation has been dismantled, although the industry remains fragmented by rules that continue to separate banks from other enterprises. Meanwhile, finance has gone global and increasingly high-tech. This book, originally prepared as a report to Congress by the Treasury Department, outlines a framework for setting policy toward the financial services industry in the coming decades. The authors, who worked closely with senior Treasury officials in developing their recommendations, identify three core principles that lie at the heart of that framework: an enhanced role for competition; a shift in emphasis from preventing failures of financial institutions at all cost toward containing the damage of any failures that inevitably occur in a competitive market; and a greater reliance on more targeted interventions to achieve policy goals rather than broad measures, such as flat prohibitions on certain activities.



After the Music Stopped

After the Music Stopped Author Alan S. Blinder
ISBN-10 9781101605875
Release 2013-01-24
Pages 528
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New York Times Bestseller One of our wisest and most clear-eyed economic thinkers offers a masterful narrative of the crisis and its lessons. Many fine books on the financial crisis were first drafts of history—books written to fill the need for immediate understanding. Alan S. Blinder, esteemed Princeton professor, Wall Street Journal columnist, and former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, held off, taking the time to understand the crisis and to think his way through to a truly comprehensive and coherent narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we can do from here—mired as we still are in its wreckage. With bracing clarity, Blinder shows us how the U.S. financial system, which had grown far too complex for its own good—and too unregulated for the public good—experienced a perfect storm beginning in 2007. Things started unraveling when the much-chronicled housing bubble burst, but the ensuing implosion of what Blinder calls the “bond bubble” was larger and more devastating. Some people think of the financial industry as a sideshow with little relevance to the real economy—where the jobs, factories, and shops are. But finance is more like the circulatory system of the economic body: if the blood stops flowing, the body goes into cardiac arrest. When America’s financial structure crumbled, the damage proved to be not only deep, but wide. It took the crisis for the world to discover, to its horror, just how truly interconnected—and fragile—the global financial system is. Some observers argue that large global forces were the major culprits of the crisis. Blinder disagrees, arguing that the problem started in the U.S. and was pushed abroad, as complex, opaque, and overrated investment products were exported to a hungry world, which was nearly poisoned by them. The second part of the story explains how American and international government intervention kept us from a total meltdown. Many of the U.S. government’s actions, particularly the Fed’s, were previously unimaginable. And to an amazing—and certainly misunderstood—extent, they worked. The worst did not happen. Blinder offers clear-eyed answers to the questions still before us, even if some of the choices ahead are as divisive as they are unavoidable. After the Music Stopped is an essential history that we cannot afford to forget, because one thing history teaches is that it will happen again.



The First Great Financial Crisis of the 21st Century

The First Great Financial Crisis of the 21st Century Author James R Barth
ISBN-10 9789814651264
Release 2015-10-23
Pages 520
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Although there have been numerous studies of the causes and consequences of the Great Financial Crisis of 2007–2010 in the US and abroad, many of these were undertaken only for a small number of countries and before the financial and economic effects were fully realized and before various governmental policy responses were decided upon and actually implemented. This book aims to fill these voids by providing a more thorough assessment now that the worst events and the regulatory reforms are sufficiently behind us and much more information about these developments is available. It reviews and analyzes the causes and consequences of and the regulatory responses to the Great Financial Crisis, particularly from a public policy viewpoint. In the process, it explores such intriguing questions as: What caused the crisis? How did the crisis differ across countries? What is the outlook for another crisis, and when? This is a must read for those who are trying to find answers to these questions. Contents:The Great Financial Crisis of 2007–2010: The Sinners and Their Sins (G G Kaufman)The Costs of the 2007–2009 Financial Crisis (H Rosenblum)The US Financial Crisis and the Great Recession: Counting the Costs (Gillian G H Garcia)US Housing Policy and the Financial Crisis (Peter J Wallison)Playing for Time: The Fed's Attempt to Manage the Crisis as a Liquidity Problem (R A Eisenbeis and R J Herring)Japan's Financial Regulatory Responses to the Global Financial Crisis (K Harada, T Hoshi, M Imai, S Koibuchi and A Yasuda)Regulatory Response to the Financial Crisis in Europe: Recent Developments (2010–2013) (S Carbó-Valverde, H A Benink, T Berglund and C Wihlborg)Regulatory Change in Australia and New Zealand Following the Global Financial Crisis (C A Brown, K T Davis and D G Mayes)The Dodd-Frank Act: Systemic Risk, Enhanced Prudential Regulation, and Orderly Liquidation (G G Kaufman and R W Nelson)The Trade Execution and Central Clearing Requirements of Dodd-Frank Title VII — Transparency, Risk Management, and Financial Stability (R S Steigerwald)A Primer on Dodd-Frank's Title VIII (C Baker)Macroliquidity: Selected Topics Related to Title XI of the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 (W F Todd)The Dodd-Frank Act: Key Features, Implementation Progress, and, Financial System Impact (J R Barth, A (Penny) Prabha and C Wihlborg)Hair of the Dog That Bit Us: The Insufficiency of New and Improved Capital Requirements (E J Kane)Misdiagnosis: Incomplete Cures of Financial Regulatory Failures (J R Barth, G Caprio Jr and R Levine)Path-Dependent Monetary Policy in the Post-Financial Crisis Era of Dodd-Frank (H Rosenblum)Bank Crisis Resolution and the Insufficiency of Fiscal Backstops: The Case of Spain (S Carbó-Valverde and M J Nieto) Readership: Graduate students, academics, economists, finance professionals, monetary, banking authorities and financial regulatory bodies, and those who are interested to find out the impacts of the Great Financial Crisis and the adequecy of the reforms and policy responses in its aftermath. Key Features:Analyzes theoretically and empirically the Great Financial Crisis of 2007–2010 not only in the micro- and macro-perspectives, but also with case studies on different countriesPresents a much more thorough assessment on the causes and consequences of and the regulatory responses to the Great Financial Crisis with the most up-to-date informationEmphasizes in particular the Dodd–Frank Act: its implementation and its impacts on financial regulation, monetary policy and the future of global financeKeywords:Financial Economics;Banks;Depository Institutions;Micro Finance Institutions;Mortgages;Macroeconomics;Monetary Economics;Dodd-Frank;Financial Crisis;Financial Regulations;Regulatory Framework;Bankers;Systemic Risk;Recession



American finance for the twenty first century

American finance for the twenty first century Author Robert E. Litan
ISBN-10 UIUC:30112004808579
Release 1997
Pages 162
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As recently as thirty years ago, Americans lived in a financial world that today seems distant. Investment and borrowing choices were meager: virtually all transactions were conducted in cash or by check. The financial services industry was heavily regulated, as an outgrowth of the Depression, while an elaborate safety net was constructed to prevent a repeat of that dismal episode in American history.Today, consumers and businesses have a dizzying array of choices about where to invest and borrow. Plastic credit cards and electronic transfers increasingly are replacing cash and checks. Much regulation has been dismantled, although the industry remains fragmented by rules that continue to separate banks from other enterprises. Meanwhile, finance has gone global and increasingly high-tech.This book, originally prepared as a report to Congress by the Treasury Department, outlines a framework for setting policy toward the financial services industry in the coming decades. The authors, who worked closely with senior Treasury officials in developing their recommendations, identify three core principles that lie at the heart of that framework: an enhanced role for competition; a shift in emphasis from preventing failures of financial institutions at all cost toward containing the damage of any failures that inevitably occur in a competitive market; and a greater reliance on more targeted interventions to achieve policy goals rather than broad measures, such as flat prohibitions on certain