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Gandhi and Civil Disobedience

Gandhi and Civil Disobedience Author Judith M. Brown
ISBN-10 0521066956
Release 2008-10-30
Pages 436
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Mahatma Gandhi's lengthy Indian career was of central importance in the development of Indian politics and the changing relationship of the British raj and its subjects. But the extent of his political influence and his role varied considerably at different times. This book is an analysis, based on new material, of the phase between 1928 and 1934 when Gandhi was leader of a continental campaign of civil disobedience against the Raj. During this time Gandhi emerged from the comparative political quiescence which had followed his initial rise to prominence in 1920 as architect of a campaign of non-cooperation with the Raj. He resumed a crucial role as leader of the Congress movement against the British. At the peak of his political influence he negotiated a 'pact' with the Viceroy by which the civil disobedience campaign - most graphically illustrated in the famous Salt March to Dandi - was suspended.

Social and Political Thought of Mahatma Gandhi

Social and Political Thought of Mahatma Gandhi Author Bidyut Chakrabarty
ISBN-10 041536096X
Release 2006
Pages 234
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During his campaign against racism in South Africa, and his involvement in the Congress-led nationalist struggle against British colonial rule in India, Mahatma Gandhi developed a new form of political struggle based on the idea of satyagraha, or non-violent protest. He ushered in a new era of nationalism in India by articulating the nationalist protest in the language of non-violence, or ahisma, that galvanized the masses into action. Focusing on the principles of satyagraha and non-violence, and their evolution in the context of anti-imperial movements organized by Gandhi, this fascinating book looks at how these precepts underwent changes reflecting the ideological beliefs of the participants. Assessing Gandhi and his ideology, the text centres on the ways in which Gandhi took into account the views of other leading personalities of the era whilst articulating his theory of action. Concentrating on Gandhiâe(tm)s writings in Harijan, the weekly newspaper he founded, this volume provides a unique contextualized study of an iconic manâe(tm)s social and political ideas.

The Statecraft of British Imperialism

The Statecraft of British Imperialism Author Robert Desmond King
ISBN-10 0714648272
Release 1999
Pages 272
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These stimulating essays reassess the meaning of British imperialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They are written by leading authorities in the field and range in scope from the aftermath of the American revolution to the liquidation of the British empire, from the Caribean to the Pacific, from Suez to Hong Kong.

The Cambridge Companion to Gandhi

The Cambridge Companion to Gandhi Author Judith M. Brown
ISBN-10 9781139824842
Release 2011-02-21
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Even today, six decades after his assassination in January 1948, Mahatma Gandhi is still revered as the father of the Indian nation. His intellectual and moral legacy, and the example of his life and politics, serve as an inspiration to human rights and peace movements, political activists and students. This book, comprised of essays by renowned experts in the fields of Indian history and philosophy, traces Gandhi's extraordinary story. The first part of the book explores his transformation from a small-town lawyer during his early life in South Africa into a skilled political activist and leader of civil resistance in India. The second part is devoted to Gandhi's key writings and his thinking on a broad range of topics, including religion, conflict, politics and social relations. The final part reflects on Gandhi's image and on his legacy in India, the West, and beyond.


Gandhi Author David Arnold
ISBN-10 9781317882350
Release 2014-06-17
Pages 288
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Gandhi's is an extraordinary and compelling story. Few individuals in history have made so great a mark upon their times. And yet Gandhi never held high political office, commanded no armies and was not even a compelling orator. His 'power' therefore makes a particularly fascinating subject for investigation. David Arnold explains how and why the shy student and affluent lawyer became one of the most powerful anti-colonial figures Western empires in Asia ever faced and why he aroused such intense affection, loyalty (and at times much bitter hatred) among Indians and Westerners alike. Attaching as much influence to the idea and image of Gandhi as to the man himself, Arnold sees Gandhi not just as a Hindu saint but as a colonial subject, whose attitudes and experiences expressed much that was common to countless others in India and elsewhere who sought to grapple with the overwhelming power and cultural authority of the West. A vivid and highly readable introducation to Gandhi's life and times, Arnold's book opens up fascinating insights into one of the twentieth century's most remarkable men.

Nonviolent Conflict and Civil Resistance

Nonviolent Conflict and Civil Resistance Author Sharon Erickson Nepstead
ISBN-10 9781781903469
Release 2012-10-08
Pages 287
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This volume covers how regime changes, political movements and nonviolent unrest develop and then shape the political decisions of both civil society and the state. Chapter discussions include the civil rights movement in Northern Ireland, youth movements in Post-Communist states, and the efforts of nonviolent INGOs.

Nonviolent Action

Nonviolent Action Author Ronald M. McCarthy
ISBN-10 9781135067540
Release 2013-07-04
Pages 760
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The way in which education is provided for deaf children is changing, as are the demands made on teachers, both in special settings and in mainstream schools. This book offers a comprehensive account of recent research and current issues in educational policy, psychology, linguistics and audiology, as they relate to the education of the deaf and includes detailed information about further reading. It should be of interest to student teachers and teachers of the deaf, teachers in mainstream schools, academics working in the area of deafness and disability, audiologists and cochlear implant teams, parents of deaf children, and members of the deaf community.

Civil Disobedience

Civil Disobedience Author William E. Scheuerman
ISBN-10 9781509518647
Release 2018-02-19
Pages 216
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What is civil disobedience? Although Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King helped to bring the idea to prominence, even today it remains unclear how we should best understand civil disobedience. Why have so many different activists and intellectuals embraced it, and to what ends? Is civil disobedience still politically relevant in today's hyper-connected world? Does it make sense, for example, to describe Edward Snowden's actions, or those of recent global movements like Occupy, as falling under this rubric? If so, how must it adapt to respond to the challenges of digitalization and globalization and the rise of populist authoritarianism in the West? In this elegantly written introductory text, William E. Scheuerman systematically analyzes the most important interpretations of civil disobedience. Drawing out the striking differences separating religious, liberal, radical democratic, and anarchist views, he nonetheless shows that core commonalities remain. Against those who water down the idea of civil disobedience or view it as obsolescent, Scheuerman successfully salvages its central elements. The concept of civil disobedience, he argues, remains a pivotal tool for anyone hoping to bring about political and social change.

Land Water Language and Politics in Andhra

Land  Water  Language and Politics in Andhra Author Brian Stoddart
ISBN-10 9781317809753
Release 2014-03-14
Pages 237
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This book explains how access to and use of land, water and language helped shape Andhra politics in India from 1850 down to the present day. After independence, the debate over land reform and policies on irrigation has shaped the fortunes of various governments, while the debate over the make-up of the language-based state has stimulated separatist movements like the one in support of Telangana. The book discusses how British innovations in irrigation in coastal Andhra in the mid-nineteenth century transformed the economy there from food crops to cash crops, and created new markets for local entrepreneurs. This stimulated increased education and social reform in the region, which in turn supported new politics in search of constitutional concessions. The drive for a Telugu language-based province then arose in concert, and those political resources were then used to determine local patterns down to independence. The 1930s ruse of the socialists, then the communist organisations, was an extension of land and water tax debates, which impacted the political nature of development — both before and after — independence. This is one of the first books on Andhra that recounts this story and is based on extensive archival research exploring the deep relationships between land, water, language and politics. It would be of primary interest to those studying modern nationalism in India, natural resource management, Indian politics and economic growth.

Nationalism and Post Colonial Identity

Nationalism and Post Colonial Identity Author Anshuman A Mondal
ISBN-10 9781134494170
Release 2004-02-24
Pages 304
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How have nations and nationhood become the dominant form of political organization today? What is the role of culture in nationalism? In what ways have the ideological development of nationalisms in the post-colonial world shaped understandings of contemporary political problems such as the rise of radical Islam, communalism, and the failure of secular-liberal democracy? This book offers the first comparative study of two highly significant anti-colonial nationalisms. Its close analysis of nationalist discourse in India and Egypt is situated within a new theoretical framework for studying nationalism, based on a trenchant critique of theorists such as Benedict Anderson, Ernest Gellner, Eric Hobsbawm and Anthony Smith.

Acts of Conscience

Acts of Conscience Author Joseph Kip Kosek
ISBN-10 9780231144193
Release 2011
Pages 352
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In response to the massive bloodshed that defined the twentieth century, American religious radicals developed a modern form of nonviolent protest, one that combined Christian principles with new uses of mass media. Greatly influenced by the ideas of Mohandas Gandhi, these "acts of conscience" included sit-ins, boycotts, labor strikes, and conscientious objection to war. Beginning with World War I and ending with the ascendance of Martin Luther King Jr., Joseph Kip Kosek traces the impact of A. J. Muste, Richard Gregg, and other radical Christian pacifists on American democratic theory and practice. These dissenters found little hope in the secular ideologies of Wilsonian Progressivism, revolutionary Marxism, and Cold War liberalism, all of which embraced organized killing at one time or another. The example of Jesus, they believed, demonstrated the immorality and futility of such violence under any circumstance and for any cause. Tracing the rise of militant nonviolence across a century of industrial conflict, imperialism, racial terror, and international warfare, Kosek recovers radical Christians' remarkable stance against the use of deadly force, even during World War II and other seemingly just causes. His research sheds new light on an interracial and transnational movement that posed a fundamental, and still relevant, challenge to America's political and religious mainstream.

Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi Author April Carter
ISBN-10 031328296X
Release 1995
Pages 169
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Selectively drawing on the literature from the 1920s to 1990s, this volume covers Gandhi's life, political campaigns, philosophy, and significance.

Great Soul

Great Soul Author Joseph Lelyveld
ISBN-10 9780307389954
Release 2012
Pages 425
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An analysis of Gandhi's accomplishments as a politician and civil rights advocate reveals his conflicted ideologies and feelings about his place in history, offering insight into his philosophies, social campaigns, and private disappointments.

Gandhi Freedom and Self rule

Gandhi  Freedom  and Self rule Author Anthony Parel
ISBN-10 0739101374
Release 2000-01-01
Pages 164
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This volume presents an original account of Mahatma Gandhi's four meanings of freedom: as sovereign national independence, as the political freedom of the individual, as freedom from poverty, and as the capacity for self-rule or spiritual freedom. In this volume, seven leading Gandhi scholars write on these four meanings, engaging the reader in the ongoing debates in the East and the West and contributing to a new comparative political theory.

M K Gandhi Attorney at Law

M K  Gandhi  Attorney at Law Author Charles R. DiSalvo
ISBN-10 9780520956629
Release 2013-11-15
Pages 392
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In 1888, at the age of eighteen, Mohandas Gandhi sets out from his modest home in India. Shy, timid, and soft-spoken, he embarks on what he believes will be a new life abroad. Twenty-seven years later, at the age of forty-five, he returns—this time fearless, impassioned, and ready to lead his country to freedom. What transformed him? The law. M. K. Gandhi, Attorney at Law is the first biography of the Mahatma’s early years as a lawyer. It follows Gandhi as he embarks on a personal journey of self-discovery: from his education in Britain, through the failure of his first law practice in India, to his eventual migration to South Africa. Though he found initial success representing wealthy Indian merchants, events on the ground would come to change him. Relentless attacks by the white colonial establishment on Indian civil rights prompted Gandhi to give up his lucrative business in favor of representing the oppressed in court. Gandhi had originally hoped that the South African legal system could be relied upon for justice. But when the courts failed to respond, he had no choice but to shift tactics, developing what would ultimately become his lasting legacy—the philosophy and practice of nonviolent civil disobedience. As he took on the most powerful governmental, economic, and political forces of his day, Gandhi transformed himself from a modest civil rights lawyer into a tireless freedom fighter. Relying on never-before-seen archival materials, this book provides the reader with a front-row seat to the dramatic events that would alter Gandhi—and history—forever.

Gandhi s Experiments with Truth

Gandhi s Experiments with Truth Author Richard L. Johnson
ISBN-10 0739111434
Release 2006
Pages 388
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This comprehensive Gandhi reader provides an essential new reference for scholars and students of his life and thought. It is the only text available that presents Gandhi's own writings, including excerpts from three of his books An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth, Satyagraha in South Africa, Hind Swaraj (Indian Home Rule)-a major pamphlet, Constructive Programme: Its Meaning and Place, and many journal articles and letters along with a biographical sketch of his life in historical context and recent essays by highly regarded scholars. The writers of these essays hailing from the United States, Canada, Great Britain and India, with academic credentials in several different disciplines examine his nonviolent campaigns, his development of programs to unify India, and his impact on the world in the second half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first. Gandhi's Experiments with Truth provides an unparalleled range of scholarly material and perspectives on this enduring philosopher, peace activist, and spiritual guide."


Gandhi Author Antony Copley
ISBN-10 9780195631906
Release 1993
Pages 118
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Mahatma Gandhi was one of the outstanding moral and political figures of the twentieth century. This book assesses his life and career, from his education in India and England, through his years in South Africa as a young lawyer and emergence as leader of the Indian minority there, to his return to India and central role in the struggle against the Raj. Antony Copley examines the intellectual and cultural values, and the events, particularly the Second World War, which shaped Gandhi'sdistinctive political, economic and social ideas, especially his philosophy of non-violence. He concludes by considering the legacy of Gandhi's thinking both within and beyond India.