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Greek Art and Archaeology C 1200 30 BC

Greek Art and Archaeology C  1200 30 BC Author Dimitris Plantzos
ISBN-10 1937040577
Release 2016-06-01
Pages 304
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This lavishly illustrated volume presents a systematic survey of Greek art and archaeology from the collapse of Mycenaean civilization to the dissolution of the Ptolemaic realm. The book begins with an introductory chapter covering the basic principles of archaeological research as well as a concise survey of the developments that led to the establishment of classical archaeology as an academic discipline. Four chapters follow, covering developments in Greek art and archaeology in the Early Iron Age, the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods respectively. Through concise, systematic coverage of the main categories of classical monuments, the reader is taken on a tour of ancient Greece through the most important period in its history, the first millennium BC. Architecture and city planning, sculpture, painting, pottery, metallurgy, jewelry, and numismatics are some of the areas covered. The book caters primarily to the nonspecialist looking for the essential in ancient Greece. The text is divided into accessible, user-friendly sections including case studies, terminology, charts, maps, a timeline, and full index. Designed as an academic textbook, the volume will interest anyone seeking an inclusive and detailed survey of the most important material remains of ancient Greek civilization. Originally published in Greek by Kapon Edtions (Athens 2011), Greek Art and Archaeology is now expanded with additional material and illustrations specially provided for this edition, and in a translation by Nicola Wardle.



Greek Art and Archaeology

Greek Art and Archaeology Author Dēmētrēs Plantzos
ISBN-10 OCLC:958163450
Release 2016
Pages 303
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Greek Art and Archaeology has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Greek Art and Archaeology also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Greek Art and Archaeology book for free.



The Art of Painting in Ancient Greece

The Art of Painting in Ancient Greece Author Dimitris Plantzos
ISBN-10 1948488051
Release 2018-05-15
Pages 360
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This new and richly illustrated overview of Greek painting combines a fresh scholarly approach to visual arts with the most complete survey to date of the painted monuments of classical antiquity. The Art of Painting in Ancient Greece covers a wide chronological and geographical span, from the Bronze Age murals of Knossos, Santorini and Mycenae to the opulent villas of the Roman Empire, from Anatolia and Egypt in the East to Campania and Etruria in the West. Surveying the techniques, materials, and works produced, as well as ancient literary accounts, the book engages in five main lines of inquiry: Why did the Greeks cover the walls of their sanctuaries, agoras, palaces, homes, and even their tombs with painted images? What topics, real or imaginary, did they choose to depict? How were those images created? What were the techniques employed and the materials used? Who painted those images? And how does the spectacular phenomenon of Greek monumental painting compare with other branches of Greek art, from mosaics and vase painting to sculpture?



Art and Archaeology of the Greek World

Art and Archaeology of the Greek World Author Richard T. Neer
ISBN-10 0500051666
Release 2012-01-01
Pages 400
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This richly illustrated, authoritative and accessible book presents a fresh way of looking at ancient Greek art and archaeology, combining a clear chronological narrative with a lively account of art and material culture and emphasizing the cosmopolitan character of the entire Greek world over two thousand years. Through up-to-date and balanced coverage that integrates the archaeological evidence into its broader historical, cultural and social context, Richard Neer suggests new ways of thinking about fundamental subjects, such as the relationship between art and politics and the evolution of style. Recent discoveries are included, such as an astonishing Minoan-style bull-leaping fresco from Egypt; a spectacular marble sarcophagus from northwest Anatolia; a bronze statue of an athlete found in the sea off Croatia; and tomb paintings from ancient Macedonia. Quotations from ancient texts provide first-hand testimonials, and numerous photographs, maps, plans and chronological charts enliven and support the text. Boxes address illuminating topics and controversial issues, including looting: the connections between Homers poems and the archaeological record; manufacturing techniques; and new discoveries.



The Archaeology of Ancient Greece

The Archaeology of Ancient Greece Author James Whitley
ISBN-10 0521627338
Release 2001-10-04
Pages 484
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A synthesis of research on the material culture of Greece in the Archaic and Classical periods, first published in 2001.



Greece in the Making 1200 479 BC

Greece in the Making 1200   479 BC Author Robin Osborne
ISBN-10 9781134104895
Release 2009-03-16
Pages 400
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Greece in the Making 1200–479 BC is an accessible and comprehensive account of Greek history from the end of the Bronze Age to the Classical Period. The first edition of this book broke new ground by acknowledging that, barring a small number of archaic poems and inscriptions, the majority of our literary evidence for archaic Greece reported only what later writers wanted to tell, and so was subject to systematic selection and distortion. This book offers a narrative which acknowledges the later traditions, as traditions, but insists that we must primarily confront the contemporary evidence, which is in large part archaeological and art historical, and must make sense of it in its own terms. In this second edition, as well as updating the text to take account of recent scholarship and re-ordering, Robin Osborne has addressed more explicitly the weaknesses and unsustainable interpretations which the first edition chose merely to pass over. He now spells out why this book features no ‘rise of the polis’ and no ‘colonization’, and why the treatment of Greek settlement abroad is necessarily spread over various chapters. Students and teachers alike will particularly appreciate the enhanced discussion of economic history and the more systematic treatment of issues of gender and sexuality.



A History of the Archaic Greek World

A History of the Archaic Greek World Author Jonathan M. Hall
ISBN-10 9780631226680
Release 2007
Pages 321
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Chronicles the history of ancient Greece from 1200 to 479 BCE, describing the rise of the city-state and citizen militias, and examining the origins of egalitarianism.



Archaic and Classical Greek Art

Archaic and Classical Greek Art Author Robin Osborne
ISBN-10 0192842021
Release 1998
Pages 270
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Explores the art of ancient Greece and its relationship to the world in which it was produced.



Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece Author Thomas R. Martin
ISBN-10 9780300129953
Release 2000
Pages 254
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In this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. This edition has been updated with new suggested readings and illustrations.



A History of Roman Art

A History of Roman Art Author Steven L. Tuck
ISBN-10 9781118885437
Release 2014-12-16
Pages 408
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A History of Roman Art provides a wide-ranging survey of the subject from the founding of Rome to the rule of Rome's first Christian emperor, Constantine. Incorporating the most up-to-date information available on the topic, this new textbook explores the creation, use, and meaning of art in the Roman world. Extensively illustrated with 375 color photographs and line drawings Broadly defines Roman art to include the various cultures that contributed to the Roman system Focuses throughout on the overarching themes of Rome's cultural inclusiveness and art's important role in promoting Roman values Discusses a wide range of Roman painting, mosaic, sculpture, and decorative arts, as well as architecture and associated sculptures within the cultural contexts they were created and developed Offers helpful and instructive pedagogical features for students, such as timelines; key terms defined in margins; a glossary; sidebars with key lessons and explanatory material on artistic technique, stories, and ancient authors; textboxes on art and literature, art from the provinces, and important scholarly perspectives; and primary sources in translation A book companion website is available at www.wiley.com/go/romanart with the following resources: PowerPoint slides, glossary, and timeline Steven Tuck is the 2014 recipient of the American Archaeological Association's Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award.



Citadel to City state

Citadel to City state Author Carol G. Thomas
ISBN-10 0253216028
Release 2003-01
Pages 199
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"Citadel to City-State serves as an excellent summarization of our present knowledge of the not-so-dark Dark Age as well as an admirable prologue to the understanding of the subsequent Archaeic and Classical periods." —David Rupp, Phoenix The Dark Age of Greece is one of the least understood periods of Greek history. A terra incognita between the Mycenaean civilization of Late Bronze Age Greece and the flowering of Classical Greece, the Dark Age was, until the last few decades, largely neglected. Now new archaeological methods and the discovery of new evidence have made it possible to develop a more comprehensive view of the entire period. Citadel to City-State explores each century from 1200 to 700 B.C.E. through an individual site—Mycenae, Nichoria, Athens, Lefkandi, Corinth, and Ascra—that illustrates the major features of each period. This is a remarkable account of the historical detective work that is beginning to shed light on Dark Age Greece.



The Classical World

The Classical World Author Robin Lane Fox
ISBN-10 9780465003662
Release 2007-03-09
Pages 672
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The classical civilizations of Greece and Rome once dominated the world, and they continue to fascinate and inspire us. Classical art and architecture, drama and epic, philosophy and politics-these are the foundations of Western civilization. In The Classical World, eminent classicist Robin Lane Fox brilliantly chronicles this vast sweep of history from Homer to the reign of Hadrian. From the Peloponnesian War through the creation of Athenian democracy, from the turbulent empire of Alexander the Great to the creation of the Roman Empire and the emergence of Christianity, Fox serves as our witty and trenchant guide. He introduces us to extraordinary heroes and horrific villains, great thinkers and blood-thirsty tyrants. Throughout this vivid tour of two of the greatest civilizations the world has ever known, we remain in the hands of a great master.



Archaeology as Cultural History

Archaeology as Cultural History Author Ian Morris
ISBN-10 0631196021
Release 1991-01-16
Pages 376
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This book shows the reader how much archaeologists can learn from recent developments in cultural history.



A History of Greek Art

A History of Greek Art Author Mark Stansbury-O'Donnell
ISBN-10 9781444350142
Release 2015-01-27
Pages 440
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Offering a unique blend of thematic and chronological investigation, this highly illustrated, engaging text explores the rich historical, cultural, and social contexts of 3,000 years of Greek art, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Uniquely intersperses chapters devoted to major periods of Greek art from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with chapters containing discussions of important contextual themes across all of the periods Contextual chapters illustrate how a range of factors, such as the urban environment, gender, markets, and cross-cultural contact, influenced the development of art Chronological chapters survey the appearance and development of key artistic genres and explore how artifacts and architecture of the time reflect these styles Offers a variety of engaging and informative pedagogical features to help students navigate the subject, such as timelines, theme-based textboxes, key terms defined in margins, and further readings. Information is presented clearly and contextualized so that it is accessible to students regardless of their prior level of knowledge A book companion website is available at www.wiley.gom/go/greekart with the following resources: PowerPoint slides, glossary, and timeline



1177 B C

1177 B C Author Eric H. Cline
ISBN-10 9781400874491
Release 2015-09-22
Pages 264
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In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.



Edinburgh Companion to Ancient Greece and Rome

Edinburgh Companion to Ancient Greece and Rome Author Edward Bispham
ISBN-10 9780748627141
Release 2010-03-01
Pages 616
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The Edinburgh Companion, newly available in paperback, is a gateway to the fascinating worlds of ancient Greece and Rome. Wide-ranging in its approach, it demonstrates the multifaceted nature of classical civilisation and enables readers to gain guidance in drawing together the perspectives and methods of different disciplines, from philosophy to history, from poetry to archaeology, from art history to numismatics, and many more.



The End of the Bronze Age

The End of the Bronze Age Author Robert Drews
ISBN-10 0691025916
Release 1995
Pages 252
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The Bronze Age came to a close early in the twelfth century B.C. with one of the worst calamities in history: over a period of several decades, destruction descended upon key cities throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, bringing to an end the Levantine, Hittite, Trojan, and Mycenaean kingdoms and plunging some lands into a dark age that would last more than four hundred years. In his attempt to account for this destruction, Robert Drews rejects the traditional explanations - earthquakes, migrations, drought, systems collapse - and proposes a military one instead. Combining fascinating archaeological facts with vivid descriptions of military tactics, Drews presents the transition from chariot to infantry warfare as the primary cause of the Great Kingdoms' downfall. Late in the thirteenth century B.C. the barbarians who until then had been little cause for concern to the Great Kingdoms, and who had served the kings as mercenary "runners" in support of the chariots, awoke to the fact that en masse they could destroy a chariot army. There followed an orgy of slaughter, looting, and destruction. From the ashes arose the city-states of Greece and the tribal confederacy of Israel, communities that depended on massed formations of infantrymen. In making these arguments, the author uses textual and archaeological evidence to reconstruct what actually happened in the Bronze Age chariot battles, as well as the combat that characterized the Catastrophe.