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Harm to Self

Harm to Self Author Tucson Joel Feinberg Professor of Philosophy University of Arizona
ISBN-10 9780198020776
Release 1986-07-24
Pages 448
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This is the third volume of Joel Feinberg's highly regarded The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, a four-volume series in which Feinberg skillfully addresses a complex question: What kinds of conduct may the state make criminal without infringing on the moral autonomy of individual citizens? In Harm to Self, Feinberg offers insightful commentary into various notions attached to self-inflicted harm, covering such topics as legal paternalism, personal sovereignty and its boundaries, voluntariness and assumptions of risk, consent and its counterfeits, coercive force, incapacity, and choice of death.



The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law Offense to others

The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law  Offense to others Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 019503449X
Release 1985-05-16
Pages 328
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The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. Feinberg clarifies the concept ofan "offended mental state" and further contrasts the concept of offense with harm. He also considers the law of nuisance as a model for statutes creating "morals offenses," showing its inadequacy as a model for understanding "profound offenses," and discusses such issues as obscene words and socialpolicy, pornography and the Constitution, and the differences between minor and profound offenses.



Offense to Others

Offense to Others Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 0195052153
Release 1987
Pages 350
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The author focuses on the 'soffence principle', the principle that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. He examines the differences between minor and profound offences as well as the conceptual, moral, and judicial problems raised by obscenity, pornography, and 'dirty' words.



The Ends of Harm

The Ends of Harm Author Victor Tadros
ISBN-10 9780199554423
Release 2011-09-15
Pages 370
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How can the brutal and costly enterprise of criminal punishment be justified? This book makes a provocative, original contribution to the philosophical literature and debate on the morality of punishing, arguing that punishment is justified in the duties that offenders incur as a result of their wrongdoing.



Harm to Self

Harm to Self Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 OCLC:967563413
Release 1986
Pages 420
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Harm to Self has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Harm to Self also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Harm to Self book for free.



The moral limits of the criminal law

The moral limits of the criminal law Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 0195034090
Release 1984
Pages
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The moral limits of the criminal law has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The moral limits of the criminal law also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The moral limits of the criminal law book for free.



Harm to Others

Harm to Others Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 9780199878574
Release 1984-07-05
Pages 288
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This first volume in the four-volume series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law focuses on the "harm principle," the commonsense view that prevention of harm to persons other than the perpetrator is a legitimate purpose of criminal legislation. Feinberg presents a detailed analysis of the concept and definition of harm and applies it to a host of practical and theoretical issues, showing how the harm principle must be interpreted if it is to be a plausible guide to the lawmaker.



Harm to Others

Harm to Others Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 9780195046649
Release 1987
Pages 282
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This book focuses on the 'harm principle', the common-sense view that prevention of harm to persons other than the perpetrator is a legitimate purpose of criminal legislation.



Harmless Wrongdoing

Harmless Wrongdoing Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 9780198021230
Release 1990-05-31
Pages 416
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The final volume of Feinberg's four-volume work, The Moral Limits of Criminal Law examines the philosophical basis for the criminalization of so-called "victimless crimes" such as ticket scalping, blackmail, consented-to exploitation of others, commercial fortune telling, and consensual sexual relations.



Criminalising Harmful Conduct

Criminalising Harmful Conduct Author Nina Persak
ISBN-10 9780387464046
Release 2007-06-04
Pages 153
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This book explores the issue of legitimate criminalization in a modern, liberal society. It argues that criminalization should be limited by normative principles, defining the substance of what can be legitimately proscribed. Coverage provides a comparative study between two major criminal legal systems and its theories: the Anglo-American, on one side, and the Continental criminal legal system of Germanic legal circle, on the other.



The Limits of the Criminal Sanction

The Limits of the Criminal Sanction Author Herbert Packer
ISBN-10 080478079X
Release 1968-06-01
Pages 388
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The argument of this book begins with the proposition that there are certain things we must understand about the criminal sanction before we can begin to talk sensibly about its limits. First, we need to ask some questions about the rationale of the criminal sanction. What are we trying to do by defining conduct as criminal and punishing people who commit crimes? To what extent are we justified in thinking that we can or ought to do what we are trying to do? Is it possible to construct an acceptable rationale for the criminal sanction enabling us to deal with the argument that it is itself an unethical use of social power? And if it is possible, what implications does that rationale have for the kind of conceptual creature that the criminal law is? Questions of this order make up Part I of the book, which is essentially an extended essay on the nature and justification of the criminal sanction. We also need to understand, so the argument continues, the characteristic processes through which the criminal sanction operates. What do the rules of the game tell us about what the state may and may not do to apprehend, charge, convict, and dispose of persons suspected of committing crimes? Here, too, there is great controversy between two groups who have quite different views, or models, of what the criminal process is all about. There are people who see the criminal process as essentially devoted to values of efficiency in the suppression of crime. There are others who see those values as subordinate to the protection of the individual in his confrontation with the state. A severe struggle over these conflicting values has been going on in the courts of this country for the last decade or more. How that struggle is to be resolved is a second major consideration that we need to take into account before tackling the question of the limits of the criminal sanction. These problems of process are examined in Part II. Part III deals directly with the central problem of defining criteria for limiting the reach of the criminal sanction. Given the constraints of rationale and process examined in Parts I and II, it argues that we have over-relied on the criminal sanction and that we had better start thinking in a systematic way about how to adjust our commitments to our capacities, both moral and operational.



Overcriminalization

Overcriminalization Author Douglas Husak
ISBN-10 0198043996
Release 2008-01-08
Pages 248
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The United States today suffers from too much criminal law and too much punishment. Husak describes the phenomena in some detail and explores their relation, and why these trends produce massive injustice. His primary goal is to defend a set of constraints that limit the authority of states to enact and enforce penal offenses. The book urges the weight and relevance of this topic in the real world, and notes that most Anglo-American legal philosophers have neglected it. Husak's secondary goal is to situate this endeavor in criminal theory as traditionally construed. He argues that many of the resources to reduce the size and scope of the criminal law can be derived from within the criminal law itself-even though these resources have not been used explicitly for this purpose. Additional constraints emerge from a political view about the conditions under which important rights such as the right implicated by punishment-may be infringed. When conjoined, these constraints produce what Husak calls a minimalist theory of criminal liability. Husak applies these constraints to a handful of examples-most notably, to the justifiability of drug proscriptions.



Freedom and Fulfillment

Freedom and Fulfillment Author Joel Feinberg
ISBN-10 069101924X
Release 1994
Pages 358
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Dealing with a diverse set of problems in practical and theoretical ethics, these fourteen essays, three of them previously unpublished, reconfirm Joel Feinberg's leading position in the field of legal philosophy. With a clarity and humor that will be familiar to readers of his other works, Feinberg writes on topics including "wrongful life" suits in the law of torts, or whether there is any sense in the remark that a person is so badly off that he would be better off not existing at all; the morality of abortion; educational options; free expression; civil disobedience; and the duty of easy rescue in criminal law. He continues with a three-part defense of moral rights in the abstract, a discussion of voluntary euthanasia, and an inquiry into arguments of various kinds for not granting legal rights in enforcement of a person's acknowledged moral rights. This collection concludes with two essays dealing with concepts used in appraising the whole of a person's life: absurdity and self-fulfillment, and their interplay.Dealing with a diverse set of problems in practical and theoretical ethics, these fourteen essays, three of them previously unpublished, reconfirm Joel Feinberg's leading position in the field of legal philosophy. With a clarity and humor that will be familiar to readers of his other works, Feinberg writes on topics including "wrongful life" suits in the law of torts, or whether there is any sense in the remark that a person is so badly off that he would be better off not existing at all; the morality of abortion; educational options; free expression; civil disobedience; and the duty of easy rescue in criminal law. He continues with a three-part defense of moral rights in theabstract, a discussion of voluntary euthanasia, and an inquiry into arguments of various kinds for not granting legal rights in enforcement of a person's acknowledged moral rights. This collection concludes with two essays dealing with concepts used in appraising the whole of a person's life: absurdity and self-fulfillment, and their interplay.



Criminalising Harmful Conduct

Criminalising Harmful Conduct Author Nina Persak
ISBN-10 9780387464046
Release 2007-06-04
Pages 153
Download Link Click Here

This book explores the issue of legitimate criminalization in a modern, liberal society. It argues that criminalization should be limited by normative principles, defining the substance of what can be legitimately proscribed. Coverage provides a comparative study between two major criminal legal systems and its theories: the Anglo-American, on one side, and the Continental criminal legal system of Germanic legal circle, on the other.



The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Criminal Law

The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Criminal Law Author John Deigh
ISBN-10 9780195314854
Release 2011-09-22
Pages 525
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First work of its kind (i.e., a handbook of authoritative, original essays) in the philosophy of criminal law The book covers a wide variety of topics including criminalization of obscenity and hate speech, the insanity defense, pleas of self-defense by battered women, the death penalty, and clemency. This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose research and studies concern philosophical issues in criminal law and criminal law theory. Readership: Philosophers who specialize in legal philosophy, moral philosophy, or political philosophy; Criminal Law theorists and scholars; Criminologists; and Philosophy graduate students with interests in moral, political or legal philosophy.



On Criminalization

On Criminalization Author J. Schonsheck
ISBN-10 9789401581004
Release 2013-06-29
Pages 314
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I begin by introducing the main issues of the work, and inviting their consideration; as enticement, I offer a sketch of their practical importance, and of the philosophical challenge they present. And I provide a preview of the work's organization and central argument. There is something so obvious that it is easily-and often-overlooked: the enforcing of criminal statutes is the most intrusive and coercive exercise of domestic power by a state. Forcibly preventing people from doing that which they wish to do, forcibly compelling people to do that which they do not wish to do-and wielding force merely attempting to compel or prevent-these state activities have extraordinarily serious ramifications. Indeed, no state institutions are likely to have more profound an impact on the lives of individual citizens than those of the criminal justice system. I endorse Herbert Packer's assessment: The criminal sanction is the law's ultimate threat. Being punished for a crime is different from being regulated in the public interest, or being forced to compensate another who has been injured by one's conduct, or being treated for a disease. The sanction is at once l uniquely coercive and, in the broadest sense, uniquely expensive. As a consequence, these state activities are in special need of moral warrant. Given the great potential for doing grave injustice, the power of the state embodied in the criminal justice system ought not be exercised in the absence of a complete and compelling moral justification.



Making the Modern Criminal Law

Making the Modern Criminal Law Author Lindsay Farmer
ISBN-10 9780191058592
Release 2016-01-21
Pages 360
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The Criminalization series arose from an interdisciplinary investigation into criminalization, focussing on the principles that might guide decisions about what kinds of conduct should be criminalized, and the forms that criminalization should take. Developing a normative theory of criminalization, the series tackles the key questions at the heart of the issue: what principles and goals should guide legislators in deciding what to criminalize? How should criminal wrongs be classified and differentiated? How should law enforcement officials apply the law's specifications of offences? This, the fifth book in the series, offers a historical and conceptual account of the development of the modern criminal law in England and as it has spread to common law jurisdictions around the world. The book offers a historical perspective on the development of theories of criminalization. It shows how the emergence of theories of criminalization is inextricably linked to modern understandings of the criminal law as a conceptually distinct body of rules, and how this in turn has been shaped by the changing functions of criminal law as an instrument of government in the modern state. The book is structured in two main parts. The first traces the development of the modern law as a distinct, and conceptually distinct body of rules, looking in particular at ideas of jurisdiction, codification and responsibility. The second part then engages in detailed analysis of specific areas of criminal law, focusing on patterns of criminalization in relation to property, the person, and sexual conduct.