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Imperium in Imperio

Imperium in Imperio Author Sutton Griggs
ISBN-10 9780307431264
Release 2007-12-18
Pages 208
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Self-published in 1899 and sold door-to-door by the author, this classic African-American novel—a gripping exploration of oppression, miscegenation, exploitation, and black empowerment—was a major bestseller in its day. The dramatic story of a conciliatory black man and a mulatto nationalist who grow up in a racist America and are driven to join a radical movement dedicated to the creation of an all-black nation in Texas, Imperium in Imperio had a profound influence on the development of black nationalism. From the Trade Paperback edition.



Sutton E Griggs and the Struggle Against White Supremacy

Sutton E  Griggs and the Struggle Against White Supremacy Author Finnie D. Coleman
ISBN-10 1572334800
Release 2007
Pages 166
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Using Griggs's life story as a platform, Sutton E. Griggs and the Struggle against White Supremacy explores how conservative pragmatism shaped the dynamics of race relations and racial politics during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. More precisely, the book examines the various intellectual tactics that Griggs developed to combat white supremacy. Author Finnie D. Coleman shows that Griggs was a pivotal shaper of a racial uplift philosophy that bore little relationship to more melioristic attempts at racial reconciliation. Coleman explores how Griggs's family - particularly his father - influenced his political ideology. Coleman examines why and how Griggs toyed with militant and at times violent fictional responses to white supremacy when his background and temperament were profoundly conservative and peaceful. Ultimately, Griggs yielded to his father's brand of pragmatic conservatism, but not before he produced a number of works of fiction and nonfiction that pushed the boundaries of what were acceptable reactions to the racial status quo of his day. The author addresses other questions about Griggs's work: How did his fiction capture the generational differences between African Americans born in antebellum America and those who came of age at the end of the Gilded Age? Which rhetorical conventions proved effective against Jim Crow? Why have critical assessments of his works varied so greatly over the years? Most important, when compared with other writings of his day, why have his texts been so thoroughly marginalized?



Blake Or The Huts of America

Blake  Or  The Huts of America Author Martin R. Delany
ISBN-10 9780674973381
Release 2017-02-13
Pages 350
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Martin R. Delany’s Blake (c. 1860) tells the story of Henry Blake’s escape from a southern plantation and his travels in the U.S., Canada, Africa, and Cuba on a mission to unite blacks of the Atlantic region in the struggle for freedom. Jerome McGann’s edition offers the first correct printing of the work and an authoritative introduction.



The Hindered Hand

The Hindered Hand Author Sutton Elbert Griggs
ISBN-10 UOM:39015010962861
Release 1905
Pages 333
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The Hindered Hand has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The Hindered Hand also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The Hindered Hand book for free.



Black Empire

Black Empire Author George Samuel Schuyler
ISBN-10 1555531687
Release 1993-08
Pages 368
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"Imagine W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver and Marcus Garvey rolled into one fascist superman, and there you have Dr. Henry Belsidus. . . [The novels] are an Afrocentrist's dream." -- Henry Louis Gates, Jr., New York Times Book Review



Imperium in Imperio

Imperium in Imperio Author Sutton Elbert Griggs
ISBN-10 9780812971606
Release 1969
Pages 177
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Imperium in Imperio (1899) is the story of two men one black and one mulatto who grow up in a racist America. The dark-skinned Belton, a conservative assimilationist, attends college, goes to Louisiana to advocate voting rights for blacks, and barely survives a lynch mob. The lighter-skinned Bernard is traumatized by the suicide of his beautiful black sweetheart, Viola, whose dying wish convinces Bernard to become a staunch nationalist and fight for a separation of the black and white races. Both men join a radical movement whose aim is to establish Texas as an all-black country, separate from the rest of the United States. The narrator, BerI Trout, tells the story of IMPERIUM IN IMPERIO ("a nation within a nation") on the eve of his own execution. Tomorrow, he will be put to death by his fellow nationalists for exposing their radical plot, and causing the uprising to fail.



Sutton E Griggs and the Struggle Against White Supremacy

Sutton E  Griggs and the Struggle Against White Supremacy Author Finnie D. Coleman
ISBN-10 1572334800
Release 2007
Pages 166
Download Link Click Here

Using Griggs's life story as a platform, Sutton E. Griggs and the Struggle against White Supremacy explores how conservative pragmatism shaped the dynamics of race relations and racial politics during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. More precisely, the book examines the various intellectual tactics that Griggs developed to combat white supremacy. Author Finnie D. Coleman shows that Griggs was a pivotal shaper of a racial uplift philosophy that bore little relationship to more melioristic attempts at racial reconciliation. Coleman explores how Griggs's family - particularly his father - influenced his political ideology. Coleman examines why and how Griggs toyed with militant and at times violent fictional responses to white supremacy when his background and temperament were profoundly conservative and peaceful. Ultimately, Griggs yielded to his father's brand of pragmatic conservatism, but not before he produced a number of works of fiction and nonfiction that pushed the boundaries of what were acceptable reactions to the racial status quo of his day. The author addresses other questions about Griggs's work: How did his fiction capture the generational differences between African Americans born in antebellum America and those who came of age at the end of the Gilded Age? Which rhetorical conventions proved effective against Jim Crow? Why have critical assessments of his works varied so greatly over the years? Most important, when compared with other writings of his day, why have his texts been so thoroughly marginalized?



Hope Isn t Stupid

Hope Isn t Stupid Author Sean Austin Grattan
ISBN-10 9781609385217
Release 2017-10
Pages 190
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Hope Isn’t Stupid is the first study to interrogate the neglected connections between affect and the practice of utopia in contemporary American literature. Although these concepts are rarely theorized together, it is difficult to fully articulate utopia without understanding how affects circulate within utopian texts. Moving away from science fiction—the genre in which utopian visions are often located—author Sean Grattan resuscitates the importance of utopianism in recent American literary history. Doing so enables him to assert the pivotal role contemporary American literature has to play in allowing us to envision alternatives to global neoliberal capitalism. Novelists William S. Burroughs, Dennis Cooper, John Darnielle, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, and Colson Whitehead are deeply invested in the creation of utopian possibilities. A return to reading the utopian wager in literature from the postmodern to the contemporary period reinvigorates critical forms that imagine reading as an act of communication, friendship, solace, and succor. These forms also model richer modes of belonging than the diluted and impoverished ones on display in the neoliberal present. Simultaneously, by linking utopian studies and affect studies, Grattan’s work resists the tendency for affect studies to codify around the negative, instead reorienting the field around the messy, rich, vibrant, and ambivalent affective possibilities of the world. Hope Isn’t Stupid insists on the centrality of utopia not only in American literature, but in American life as well.



Winona

Winona Author Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins
ISBN-10 1409923541
Release 2008-05
Pages 156
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Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins (also wrote as: Sarah A. Allen) (1859-1930) was a prominent early African- American novelist, journalist, playwright, and editor. She is considered a pioneer in her use of the romantic novel to explore social and racial themes. Hopkins' earliest known work, Slaves' Escape; or, The Underground Railroad is one of the earliestknown literary treatments of slaves escaping to freedom. She explored the difficulties faced by African-Americans amid the racist violence of post- Civil War America in her first novel, Contending Forces, published in 1900. She published a number of serial novels over the next sixteen years as well as short stories in African-American periodicals. Hopkins spent the remainder of her years working as a stenographer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Amongst her other works are Hagar's Daughter (1901) and Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest (1902).



The New Negro in the Old South

The New Negro in the Old South Author Gabriel A. Briggs
ISBN-10 9780813574806
Release 2015-11-13
Pages 240
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Standard narratives of early twentieth-century African American history credit the Great Migration of southern blacks to northern metropolises for the emergence of the New Negro, an educated, upwardly mobile sophisticate very different from his forebears. Yet this conventional history overlooks the cultural accomplishments of an earlier generation, in the black communities that flourished within southern cities immediately after Reconstruction. In this groundbreaking historical study, Gabriel A. Briggs makes the compelling case that the New Negro first emerged long before the Great Migration to the North. The New Negro in the Old South reconstructs the vibrant black community that developed in Nashville after the Civil War, demonstrating how it played a pivotal role in shaping the economic, intellectual, social, and political lives of African Americans in subsequent decades. Drawing from extensive archival research, Briggs investigates what made Nashville so unique and reveals how it served as a formative environment for major black intellectuals like Sutton Griggs and W.E.B. Du Bois. The New Negro in the Old South makes the past come alive as it vividly recounts little-remembered episodes in black history, from the migration of Colored Infantry veterans in the late 1860s to the Fisk University protests of 1925. Along the way, it gives readers a new appreciation for the sophistication, determination, and bravery of African Americans in the decades between the Civil War and the Harlem Renaissance.



The Harbor

The Harbor Author Ernest Poole
ISBN-10 9781101565681
Release 2011-12-27
Pages 368
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Ernest Poole's bestselling, muckraking classic about the plight of the worker. The best-known novel by the winner of the first Pulitzer Prize for fiction, Ernest Poole's The Harbor was published in 1915 to instant acclaim and remains his most important book. At the heart of the story is Billy, an aspiring writer who struggles to reconcile his sympathy for workers with his middle-class allegiance to capitalist progress. As Billy comes of age on the New York waterfront, an eyewitness to explosive tensions between labor and capital that culminate in a violent strike, he learns to embrace socialism as the solution to the harbor's seething injustices. This novel, one of the most direct literary treatments of class warfare, is a valuable social history and a powerful testament to Poole's legendary talent. From the Trade Paperback edition.



Mrs Spring Fragrance

Mrs  Spring Fragrance Author Sui Sin Far
ISBN-10 9780486782737
Release 2013-10-31
Pages 144
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One of the first works of fiction published by a Chinese-American author, this collection of 17 short stories offers a revealing look at life in San Francisco's Chinatown during the early 20th century.



Of One Blood

Of One Blood Author Pauline Hopkins
ISBN-10 9781451604351
Release 2010-06-15
Pages 224
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Of One Blood is the last of four novels written by Pauline Hopkins. She is considered by some to be "the most prolific African-American woman writer and the most influential literary editor of the first decade of the twentieth century, though she is one of the lesser known literary figures of the much lauded Harlem Renaissance. Of One Blood first appeared in serial form in Colored American Magazine in the November and December 1902 and the January 1903 issues of the publication, during the four-year period that Hopkins served as its editor. Hopkins tells the story of Reuel Briggs, a medical student who couldn't care less about being black and appreciating African history, but finds himself in Ethiopia on an archeological trip. His motive is to raid the country of lost treasures -- which he does find in the ancient land. However, he discovers much more than he bargained for: the painful truth about blood, race, and the half of his history that was never told. Hopkins wrote the novel intending, in her own words, to "raise the stigma of degradation from [the Black] race." The title, Of One Blood, refers to the biological kinship of all human beings.



Utopia illustrated

Utopia  illustrated Author Thomas More
ISBN-10 9781635372540
Release 2018-04-05
Pages
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Utopia (Libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festivus, de optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia) is a work of fiction and socio-political satire. The book is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious, social and political customs.



Empire

Empire Author Michael Hardt
ISBN-10 0674038320
Release 2001-09-15
Pages 496
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Imperialism as we knew it may be no more, but Empire is alive and well. It is, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri demonstrate in this bold work, the new political order of globalization. Their book shows how this emerging Empire is fundamentally different from the imperialism of European dominance and capitalist expansion in previous eras. Rather, today's Empire draws on elements of U.S. constitutionalism, with its tradition of hybrid identities and expanding frontiers. More than analysis, Empire is also an unabashedly utopian work of political philosophy.



Breaking with the Past

Breaking with the Past Author Hans Van de Ven
ISBN-10 9780231137386
Release 2014-02-25
Pages 417
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From 1854 to 1952, the Chinese Maritime Customs Service delivered one-third to one-half of all revenue available to China’s central authorities. Much more than a tax collector, the institution managed China’s harbors and surveyed the Chinese coast. It oversaw a college training Chinese diplomats; translated legal, philosophical, economic, and scientific documents; organized contributions to international exhibitions; and pioneered China’s modern postal system. After the 1911 Revolution, the agency began managing China’s international loans and domestic bond issues, and in the 1930s, it created a coast guard to combat smuggling. The Customs Service was central to China’s post-Taiping entrance into the world of modern nation-states and twentieth-century trade and finance, and this is the first comprehensive history of the Customs Service’s activities and truly cosmopolitan nature. At times, the Service kept China together when little else did.



Theories of Empire 1450 1800

Theories of Empire  1450   1800 Author David Armitage
ISBN-10 9781351879767
Release 2016-12-14
Pages 420
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Theories of Empire, 1450-1800 draws upon published and unpublished work by leading scholars in the history of European expansion and the history of political thought. It covers the whole span of imperial theories from ancient Rome to the American founding, and includes a series of essays which address the theoretical underpinnings of the Spanish, Portuguese, French, British and Dutch empires in both the Americas and in Asia. The volume is unprecedented in its attention to the wider intellectual contexts within which those empires were situated - particularly the discourses of universal monarchy, millenarianism, mercantalism, and federalism - and in its mapping of the shift from Roman conceptions of imperium to the modern idea of imperialism.