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Indigenous American Women

Indigenous American Women Author Devon Abbott Mihesuah
ISBN-10 0803282869
Release 2003
Pages 246
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Oklahoma Choctaw scholar Devon Abbott Mihesuah offers a frank and absorbing look at the complex, evolving identities of American Indigenous women today, their ongoing struggles against a centuries-old legacy of colonial disempowerment, and how they are seen and portrayed by themselves and others. ø Mihesuah first examines how American Indigenous women have been perceived and depicted by non-Natives, including scholars, and by themselves. She then illuminates the pervasive impact of colonialism and patriarchal thought on Native women?s traditional tribal roles and on their participation in academia. Mihesuah considers how relations between Indigenous women and men across North America continue to be altered by Christianity and Euro-American ideologies. Sexism and violence against Indigenous women has escalated; economic disparities and intratribal factionalism and ?culturalism? threaten connections among women and with men; and many women suffer from psychological stress because their economic, religious, political, and social positions are devalued. ø In the last section, Mihesuah explores how modern American Indigenous women have empowered themselves tribally, nationally, or academically. Additionally, she examines the overlooked role that Native women played in the Red Power movement as well as some key differences between Native women "feminists" and "activists."



Indigenous Women and Feminism

Indigenous Women and Feminism Author Cheryl Suzack
ISBN-10 9780774818094
Release 2011-01-01
Pages 344
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Can the specific concerns of Indigenous women be addressed by mainstream feminism? Indigenous Women and Feminism proposes that a dynamic new line of inquiry – Indigenous feminism – is necessary to truly engage with the crucial issues of cultural identity, nationalism, and decolonization particular to Indigenous contexts. Through the lenses of politics, activism, and culture, this wide-ranging collection crosses disciplinary, national, academic, and activist boundaries to explore deeply the unique political and social positions of Indigenous women. A vital and sophisticated discussion, these timely essays will change the way we think about modern feminism and Indigenous women.



Feminist Readings of Native American Literature

Feminist Readings of Native American Literature Author Kathleen M. Donovan
ISBN-10 0816516332
Release 1998
Pages 181
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Who in a society can speak, and under what circumstances? These questions are at the heart of both Native American literature and feminist literary and cultural theory. Despite the recent explosion of publication in each of these fields, almost nothing has been written to date that explores the links between the two. With Feminist Readings of Native American Literature, Kathleen Donovan takes an important first step in examining how studies in these two fields inform and influence one another. Focusing on the works of N. Scott Momaday, Joy Harjo, Paula Gunn Allen, and others, Donovan analyzes the texts of these well-known writers, weaving a supporting web of feminist criticism throughout. With careful and gracefully offered insights, the book explores the reciprocally illuminating nature of culture and gender issues. The author demonstrates how Canadian women of mixed-blood ancestry achieve a voice through autobiographies and autobiographical novels. Using a framework of feminist reader response theory, she considers an underlying misogyny in the writings of N. Scott Momaday. And in examining commonalities between specific cultures, she discusses how two women of color, Paula Gunn Allen and Toni Morrison, explore representations of femaleness in their respective cultures. By synthesizing a broad spectrum of critical writing that overlaps women's voices and Native American literature, Donovan expands on the frame of dialogue within feminist literary and cultural theory. Drawing on the related fields of ethnography, ethnopoetics, ecofeminism, and post-colonialism, Feminist Readings of Native American Literature offers the first systematic study of the intersection between two dynamic arenas in literary studies today.



Making Space for Indigenous Feminism

Making Space for Indigenous Feminism Author Joyce Green
ISBN-10 1552668835
Release 2017-10
Pages 256
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"The 2007 first edition of this book proposed that Indigenous feminism was a valid and indeed essential theoretical and activist position, and introduced a roster of important Indigenous feminist contributors. The book has been well received nationally and internationally. It has been deployed in Indigenous Studies, Law, Political Science, and Women and Gender Studies in universities and appears on a number of doctoral comprehensive exam reading lists. The second edition, Making More Space, builds on the success of its predecessor, but is not merely a reiteration of it. Some chapters from the first edition are largely revised. A majority of the chapters are new, written for the second edition by important new scholars and activists. The second edition is more confident and less diffident about making the case for Indigenous feminism and in deploying a feminist analysis. The chapters cover issues that are relevant to some of the most important issues facing Indigenous people--violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny, and decolonisation. Specifically, new chapters deal with Indigenous resurgence, feminism amongst the Sami and in Aboriginal Australia, neoliberal restructuring in Oaxaca, Canada's settler racism and sexism, and missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada."--



Indigenous Women and Work

Indigenous Women and Work Author Carol Williams
ISBN-10 9780252094262
Release 2012-10-30
Pages 336
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The essays in Indigenous Women and Work create a transnational and comparative dialogue on the history of the productive and reproductive lives and circumstances of Indigenous women from the late nineteenth century to the present in the United States, Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa, and Canada. Surveying the spectrum of Indigenous women's lives and circumstances as workers, both waged and unwaged, the contributors offer varied perspectives on the ways women's work has contributed to the survival of communities in the face of ongoing tensions between assimilation and colonization. They also interpret how individual nations have conceived of Indigenous women as workers and, in turn, convert these assumptions and definitions into policy and practice. The essays address the intersection of Indigenous, women's, and labor history, but will also be useful to contemporary policy makers, tribal activists, and Native American women's advocacy associations. Contributors are Tracey Banivanua Mar, Marlene Brant Castellano, Cathleen D. Cahill, Brenda J. Child, Sherry Farrell Racette, Chris Friday, Aroha Harris, Faye HeavyShield, Heather A. Howard, Margaret D. Jacobs, Alice Littlefield, Cybèle Locke, Mary Jane Logan McCallum, Kathy M'Closkey, Colleen O'Neill, Beth H. Piatote, Susan Roy, Lynette Russell, Joan Sangster, Ruth Taylor, and Carol Williams.



Native American Women s Studies

Native American Women s Studies Author Stephanie A. Sellers
ISBN-10 082049710X
Release 2008
Pages 121
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This introduction to the fundamentals of Native American women's studies first looks at several definitive topics created by the western cultural notion of feminism, and western historical and religious perspectives on women. These include ecofeminism, gender roles and work, notions of power, essentialism, women's leadership, sexualities, and spirituality in light of gender. The book then discusses these concepts and their history from a traditional Native American point of view. Foremost among the questions that Native American Women's Studies addresses are: How have Native American women governed their nations? How was/is the divine creatrix expressed in Native American social systems? Most significantly, this book sheds light on the radical differences between the indigenous understanding of human experience in terms of gender, and that held and created by western culture.



Make a Beautiful Way

Make a Beautiful Way Author Barbara Alice Mann
ISBN-10 9780803260429
Release 2006
Pages 133
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Make a Beautiful Way is nothing less than a new way of looking at history-or more correctly, the reestablishment of a very old way. For too long, Euro-American discourse styles, emphasizing elite male privilege and conceptual linearity, have drowned out democratic and woman-centered Native approaches. Even when myopic western linearity is understood to be at work, analysis of Native American history, society, and culture has still been consistently placed in male custody. The recovery of women's traditions is the overarching theme in this collection of essays that helps reframe Native issues as properly gendered. Paula Gunn Allen looks at Indian lifeways through the many stitches of Indian clothes and the many steps of their powwow fancy dances. Lee Maracle calls for reconstitution of traditional social structures, based on Native American ways of knowing. Kay Givens McGowan identifies the exact sites where female power was weakened through the imposition of European culture, so that we might more effectively strengthen precisely those sites. Finally, Barbara Alice Mann examines how communication between Natives who have federal recognition and those who do not, as well as between Natives east and west of the Mississippi, became dysfunctional, and outlines how to reestablish good relations for the benefit of all. Barbara Alice Mann is a lecturer in the English department at the University of Toledo and the author of George Washington's War on Native America. Winona LaDuke is a Native American activist and the author of Recovering the Sacred: The Power of Naming and Claiming.



Bureau of Indian Affairs

Bureau of Indian Affairs Author Donald Lee Fixico
ISBN-10 9780313391798
Release 2012-01
Pages 229
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From 19th-century trade agreements and treatments to 21st-century reparations, this volume tells the story of the federal agency that shapes and enforces U.S. policy toward Native Americans. * 20 original documents, including the Delaware Treaty of 1778, the Indian Removal Act (1830), and the act of 1871 that halted Indian treaty making * Biographies of key figures, including longtime bureau commissioners John Collier and Dillon Myer



Women and Power in Native North America

Women and Power in Native North America Author Laura F. Klein
ISBN-10 0806132418
Release 2000-01-01
Pages 294
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Power is understood to be manifested in a multiplicity of ways: through cosmology, economic control, and formal hierarchy. In the Native societies examined, power is continually created and redefined through individual life stages and through the history of the society. The important issue is autonomy - whether, or to what extent, individuals are autonomous in living their lives. Each author demonstrates that women in a particular cultural area of aboriginal North America had (and have) more power than many previous observers have claimed.



Spider Woman s Web

Spider Woman s Web Author Susan Hazen-Hammond
ISBN-10 0399525467
Release 1999
Pages 242
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A collection of folklore celebrates the power of women and the treachery of human nature



Indigenizing the Academy

Indigenizing the Academy Author Devon Abbott Mihesuah
ISBN-10 0803282923
Release 2004
Pages 245
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Native American scholars reflect on issues related to academic study by students drawn from the indigenous peoples of America. Topics range from problems of racism and ethnic fraud in academic hiring to how indigenous values and perspectives can be integrated into research methodologies and interpretive theories.



A Recognition of Being

A Recognition of Being Author Kim Anderson
ISBN-10 9780889615793
Release 2016-05-02
Pages 330
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Over 15 years ago, Kim Anderson set out to explore how Indigenous womanhood had been constructed and reconstructed in Canada, weaving her own journey as a Cree/Métis woman with the insights, knowledge, and stories of the forty Indigenous women she interviewed. The result was A Recognition of Being, a powerful work that identified both the painful legacy of colonialism and the vital potential of self-definition. In this second edition, Anderson revisits her groundbreaking text to include recent literature on Indigenous feminism and two-spirited theory and to document the efforts of Indigenous women to resist heteropatriarchy. Beginning with a look at the positions of women in traditional Indigenous societies and their status after colonization, this text shows how Indigenous women have since resisted imposed roles, reclaimed their traditions, and reconstructed a powerful Native womanhood. Featuring a new foreword by Maria Campbell and an updated closing dialogue with Bonita Lawrence, this revised edition will be a vital text for courses in women and gender studies and Indigenous studies as well as an important resource for anyone committed to the process of decolonization.



The Chicago Black Renaissance and Women s Activism

The Chicago Black Renaissance and Women s Activism Author Anne Meis Knupfer
ISBN-10 9780252072932
Release 2006
Pages 244
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Looks at the history of activism by African Americans in Chicago.



Daughters of the Earth

Daughters of the Earth Author Carolyn Niethammer
ISBN-10 1439129231
Release 2010-05-11
Pages 450
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She was both guardian of the hearth and, on occasion, ruler and warrior, leading men into battle, managing the affairs of her people, sporting war paint as well as necklaces and earrings. She built houses and ground corn, wove blankets and painted pottery, played field hockey and rode racehorses. Frequently she enjoyed an open and joyous sexuality before marriage; if her marriage didn't work out she could divorce her husband by the mere act of returning to her parents. She mourned her dead by tearing her clothes and covering herself with ashes, and when she herself died was often shrouded in her wedding dress. She was our native sister, the American Indian woman, and it is of her life and lore that Carolyn Niethammer writes in this rich tapestry of America's past and present. Here, as it unfolded, is the chronology of the native American woman's life. Here are the birth rites of Caddo women from the Mississippi-Arkansas border, who bore their children alone by the banks of rivers and then immersed themselves and their babies in river water; here are Apache puberty ceremonies that are still carried on today, when the cost for the celebrations can run anywhere from one to six thousand dollars. Here are songs from the Night Dances of the Sioux, where girls clustered on one side of the lodge and boys congregated on the other; here is the Shawnee legend of the Corn Person and of Our Grandmother, the two female deities who ruled the earth. Far from the submissive, downtrodden "squaw" of popular myth, the native American woman emerges as a proud, sometimes stoic, always human individual from whom those who came after can learn much. At a time when many contemporary American women are seeking alternatives to a life-style and role they have outgrown, Daughters of the Earth offers us an absorbing -- and illuminating -- legacy of dignity and purpose.



Strong Women Stories

Strong Women Stories Author Bonita Lawrence
ISBN-10 UOM:39015059986193
Release 2003
Pages 264
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This collection of seventeen essays presents original and critical perspectives from writers, scholars and activists on issues that are pertinent to Aboriginal women and their communities in both rural and urban settings in Canada. Their contributions explore the critical issues facing Native women as they rebuild and revive their communities. Through topics such as the role of tradition, reclaiming identities and protecting Native children and the environment, they identify the restraints that shape their actions and the inspirations that feed their visions. The contributors address issues of youth, health and sexual identity; women's aging, sexuality, and health; caring for children and adults living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome; First Nations education and schooling; community-based activism on issues of prostitution and street workers; and reclaiming cultural identity through art and music.



Indigenous Men and Masculinities

Indigenous Men and Masculinities Author Robert Alexander Innes
ISBN-10 9780887554773
Release 2015-11-06
Pages 328
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What do we know of masculinities in non-patriarchal societies? Indigenous peoples of the Americas and beyond come from traditions of gender equity, complementarity, and the sacred feminine, concepts that were unimaginable and shocking to Euro-western peoples at contact. "Indigenous Men and Masculinities", edited by Kim Anderson and Robert Alexander Innes, brings together prominent thinkers to explore the meaning of masculinities and being a man within such traditions, further examining the colonial disruption and imposition of patriarchy on Indigenous men. Building on Indigenous knowledge systems, Indigenous feminism, and queer theory, the sixteen essays by scholars and activists from Canada, the U.S., and New Zealand open pathways for the nascent field of Indigenous masculinities. The authors explore subjects of representation through art and literature, as well as Indigenous masculinities in sport, prisons, and gangs. "Indigenous Men and Masculinities" highlights voices of Indigenous male writers, traditional knowledge keepers, ex-gang members, war veterans, fathers, youth, two-spirited people, and Indigenous men working to end violence against women. It offers a refreshing vision toward equitable societies that celebrate healthy and diverse masculinities.



Sovereign Stories and Blood Memories

Sovereign Stories and Blood Memories Author Annette Angela Portillo
ISBN-10 9780826359162
Release 2017-12-15
Pages 192
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Portillo analyzes traditional autobiographies and memoirs alongside interviews and social media to explore the intricacies of Native American women’s voices and the stories that they share.