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Jim Crow Laws

Jim Crow Laws Author Leslie Vincent Tischauser
ISBN-10 9780313386084
Release 2012
Pages 215
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Presents the history of the South divided under a series of discriminatory Jim Crow laws passed from 1877 to 1965, addressing the origins of legal inequality, the white justification for segregation, and the passage of the Civil Rights Act.



Talking Black and White

Talking Black and White Author Gina Castle Bell
ISBN-10 9781498516907
Release 2017-07-24
Pages 166
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Talking Black and White: An Intercultural Exploration of Twenty-First-Century Racism, Prejudice, and Perception investigates domestic race-related social justice issues and intercultural communication between Black and White individuals. Twenty-first-century racism, racial tensions, prejudice, police brutality, #BLM, misperception, and the role of the past are deconstructed in an engaging, provocative, and accessible manner. Gina Castle Bell explores these dynamics through the lenses of intercultural communication, critical intercultural communication, critical race theory, critical theory, rhetoric, sociology, race and racism, interracial communication, Black communication, identity, identity negotiation, and communication theory. This is an ideal book for scholars, students, and working professionals who are interested in intercultural communication, race relations, and healthy communication across various areas of difference.



The Jim Crow Laws and Racism in United States History

The Jim Crow Laws and Racism in United States History Author David K. Fremon
ISBN-10 9780766060951
Release 2014-07-01
Pages 96
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In 1954, the Supreme Court rejected the notion of "separate but equal" facilities in the famous Brown v. Board of Education decision. Highlighting the efforts of both blacks and whites to promote racial equality in the face of violent attempts to preserve white supremacy, Author David K. Fremon shows how segregation made the South a caste system. He traces the history of racial discrimination from the end of the Civil War through the Jim Crow era of segregation. After years of enduring separate facilities, including water fountains, telephone books, hospitals, and cemeteries, for whites and blacks, Fremon shows how African Americans and their white supporters were eventually able to win the battle for equal rights.



The Great Black Migration A Historical Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic

The Great Black Migration  A Historical Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic Author Steven A. Reich
ISBN-10 9781610696661
Release 2014-04-17
Pages 453
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Treating broad themes as well as specific topics, this guide to the Great Black Migration will introduce high school students to a touchstone critical to shaping the history of African Americans in the United States. • Provides students with essential information about key people, places, organizations, and events that defined the movement of Southern African Americans to the urban North and West • Covers the first major migration between the advent of World War I and the Great Depression and the second, smaller wave from 1940 to 1970 • Devotes considerable space to the social, cultural, and political world of black migrant communities of the urban North and West • Includes primary sources to promote critical thinking and interpretive reading underscored in the Common Core Standards • Features contributions from a wide range of disciplines, including art and music history, demography, economics, journalism, history, literary criticism, political science, and sociology



Reconstruction A Historical Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic

Reconstruction  A Historical Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic Author Richard Zuczek
ISBN-10 9781610699181
Release 2015-11-10
Pages 435
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Composed by the leading historians in the field, this single-volume encyclopedia on Reconstruction delivers the most concise, focused, and readable reference work available to educators and students. • Provides a concise, easy-to-read resource ideal for high school history students and general readers covering the key actors and events of the Reconstruction Era • Includes an introductory essay that gives readers a clear framework for understanding the events, important individuals, laws, and issues of the Reconstruction from 1863 through 1877 • Enables readers to understand how the events of Reconstruction set the stage for greater advances by African Americans educationally, politically, and socially decades later • Supplies entries written by the premier historians and researchers active today that reflect the latest in scholarship on the subject matter



Civil Rights Movement

Civil Rights Movement Author Jamie J. Wilson
ISBN-10 9781440804267
Release 2013
Pages 232
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This book gives readers a comprehensive introduction to the topic of the Civil Rights Movement—arguably the most important political movement of the 20th century—and provides a road map for future study and historical inquiry. * Provides a chronology that traces the unfolding of the subject of movement over time * Features biographical profiles of the people and organizations central to the movement * Contains a selection of primary documents that provide readers with a fuller understanding of the subject * Includes an annotated bibliography that assesses the most important print, electronic, and media resources suitable for high school student research



White Rage

White Rage Author Carol Anderson
ISBN-10 9781632864147
Release 2016-05-31
Pages 256
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National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.



Tuskegee Airmen

Tuskegee Airmen Author Barry M. Stentiford
ISBN-10 9780313386855
Release 2011-08-17
Pages 223
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This poignant history of the Tuskegee Airmen separates myth and legend from fact, placing them within the context of the growth of American airpower and the early stirrings of the African American Civil Rights Movement. • 16 original documents relating to the creation and performance of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, each accompanied by a brief description that provides historical context • 28 short biographies of black aviation and military pioneers, important people among the Tuskegee Airmen, as well as several of the Airmen themselves • A comprehensive bibliographic description of major secondary works on the Tuskegee Airmen, World War II, airpower, and black participation in the American military • A glossary of specialized terms pertaining to the military, aviation, World War II, and African Americans



50 Events That Shaped African American History 2 Volumes

50 Events That Shaped African American History  2 Volumes Author Karsonya Whitehead
ISBN-10 1440837864
Release 2017-04-30
Pages 921
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50 Events That Shaped African American History 2 Volumes has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from 50 Events That Shaped African American History 2 Volumes also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full 50 Events That Shaped African American History 2 Volumes book for free.



A Mayor s Life

A Mayor s Life Author David N. Dinkins
ISBN-10 9781610393027
Release 2013-09-17
Pages 408
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How did a scrawny black kid—the son of a barber and a domestic who grew up in Harlem and Trenton—become the 106th mayor of New York City? It's a remarkable journey. David Norman Dinkins was born in 1927, joined the Marine Corps in the waning days of World War II, went to Howard University on the G.I. Bill, graduated cum laude with a degree in mathematics in 1950, and married Joyce Burrows, whose father, Daniel Burrows, had been a state assemblyman well-versed in the workings of New York's political machine. It was his father-in-law who suggested the young mathematician might make an even better politician once he also got his law degree. The political career of David Dinkins is set against the backdrop of the rising influence of a broader demographic in New York politics, including far greater segments of the city's “gorgeous mosaic.” After a brief stint as a New York assemblyman, Dinkins was nominated as a deputy mayor by Abe Beame in 1973, but ultimately declined because he had not filed his income tax returns on time. Down but not out, he pursued his dedication to public service, first by serving as city clerk. In 1986, Dinkins was elected Manhattan borough president, and in 1989, he defeated Ed Koch and Rudy Giuliani to become mayor of New York City, the largest American city to elect an African American mayor. As the newly-elected mayor of a city in which crime had risen precipitously in the years prior to his taking office, Dinkins vowed to attack the problems and not the victims. Despite facing a budget deficit, he hired thousands of police officers, more than any other mayoral administration in the twentieth century, and launched the “Safe Streets, Safe City” program, which fundamentally changed how police fought crime. For the first time in decades, crime rates began to fall—a trend that continues to this day. Among his other major successes, Mayor Dinkins brokered a deal that kept the US Open Tennis Championships in New York—bringing hundreds of millions of dollars to the city annually—and launched the revitalization of Times Square after decades of decay, all the while deflecting criticism and some outright racism with a seemingly unflappable demeanor. Criticized by some for his handling of the Crown Heights riots in 1991, Dinkins describes in these pages a very different version of events. A Mayor's Life is a revealing look at a devoted public servant and a New Yorker in love with his city, who led that city during tumultuous times.



The Vertical Mosaic

The Vertical Mosaic Author John Porter
ISBN-10 9781442624306
Release 2015-05-07
Pages 688
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John Porter’s landmark study of social and ethnic inequality, The Vertical Mosaic, became an instant classic when it was first published in 1965. A national best seller that sold more than 100,000 copies, the book was the first major study of Canada’s class structure and one of the foundational texts in Canadian sociology. Sociologist Irving Louis Horowitz described it as “the sociological study of present-day Canada.” Fifty years later, the book retains vast significance both for its powerful critique of social exclusivity in a country that prides itself on equality and diversity and for its influence on generations of sociological researchers. The 50th Anniversary Edition features new material which contextualizes the legacy of this important book: a foreword by Porter’s colleague, Wallace Clement, and his biographer, Rick Helmes-Hayes, and a new introductory essay by historian Jack Jedwab and sociologist Vic Satzewich.



Justice Older Than the Law

Justice Older Than the Law Author Katie McCabe
ISBN-10 1604737743
Release 2009
Pages 259
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From the streets of Charlotte, North Carolina, to the segregated courtrooms of the nation's capital, from the white male bastion of the World War II Army to the male stronghold of Howard University Law School, from the pulpits of churches where women had waited years for the right to minister--in all these places Dovey Johnson Roundtree (b. 1914) sought justice. Though she is a legendary African American figure in the legal community of Washington, D.C., she remains largely unknown to the American public. "Justice Older than the Law" is her story, the product of a remarkable, ten-year collaboration with National Magazine Award-winner Katie McCabe. As a protege of Mary McLeod Bethune, Roundtree became one of the first women to break the gender and color barriers in the United States military. Inspired by Thurgood Marshall and James Madison Nabrit, Jr., Roundtree went on to make history by winning a 1955 bus desegregation case, "Sarah Keys v. Carolina Coach Company." That decision demolished "separate but equal" in the realm of interstate transportation and enabled Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to combat southern resistance to the Freedom Riders' campaign in 1961. At a time when black attorneys had to leave the courthouses to use the bathrooms, Roundtree took on Washington's white legal establishment and prevailed. She led the vanguard of women ordained to the ministry in the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1961 and merged her law practice with her ministry to fight for families and children being destroyed by urban violence. Hers is a vision of biblical and social justice older by far than the law, and her life story speaks movingly and urgently to our racially troubled times."



Civil Rights Movement

Civil Rights Movement Author Jamie J. Wilson
ISBN-10 9781440804274
Release 2013-01-24
Pages 232
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This book gives readers a comprehensive introduction to the topic of the Civil Rights Movement—arguably the most important political movement of the 20th century—and provides a road map for future study and historical inquiry. • Provides a chronology that traces the unfolding of the subject of movement over time • Features biographical profiles of the people and organizations central to the movement • Contains a selection of primary documents that provide readers with a fuller understanding of the subject • Includes an annotated bibliography that assesses the most important print, electronic, and media resources suitable for high school student research



Native Believer

Native Believer Author Ali Eteraz
ISBN-10 9781617754593
Release 2016-04-11
Pages 320
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"Native Believer stands as an important contribution to American literary culture: a book quite unlike any I've read in recent memory, which uses its characters to explore questions vital to our continuing national discourse around Islam." --New York Times Book Review, Editors' Choice "M.'s life spins out of control after his boss discovers a Qur'an in M.'s house during a party, in this wickedly funny Philadelphia picaresque about a secular Muslim's identity crisis in a country waging a never-ending war on terror." --O, the Oprah Magazine "Native Believer is a page-turning contemporary fiction that addresses burning issues about the very essence of identity, and without question Ali Eteraz is a writer’s writer, one whose ear for the English language is just as acute as fellow naturalized Americans Vladimir Nabokov (born in Russia) or Viet Thanh Nguyen (Vietnam).” --Los Angeles Review of Books "[A] poignant and profoundly funny first novel....Eteraz combines masterful storytelling with intelligent commentary to create a nuanced work of social and political art." --Booklist "Eteraz's narrative is witty and unpredictable...and the darkly comic ending is pleasingly macabre. As for M., in this identity-obsessed dandy, Eteraz has created a perfect protagonist for the times. A provocative and very funny exploration of Muslim identity in America today." --Kirkus Reviews "In bitingly funny prose, first novelist Eteraz sums up the pain and contradictions of an American not wanting to be categorized; the ending is a bang-up surprise." --Library Journal "Who wants to be Muslim in post-9/11 America? Many of the characters in Ali Eteraz‘s new novel Native Believer have no choice in the matter; they deal in a variety of ways with issues of belonging and identity in a society bent on categorizing, stereotyping, and targeting Muslims." --KPFA Pacifica "Ali Eteraz is a pen name that means ‘Noble Protest.’ In his darkly funny debut novel, the protest may not be entirely noble, but it is essential—the story follows M., a Philadelphia man who is Muslim by birth but not by belief. When he gets fired for owning a copy of the Quran, his life spirals out of control as he tries to find some semblance of a place in the world." -- Literary Hub "Ali Eteraz’s fiction has encompassed everything from the surreal and fantastical to the urgently political. Native Believer, his debut novel, explores questions of nationality, religion, and the fears and paranoia in American society circa right now. --Vol. 1 Brooklyn "A sad, funny, and haunting novel that debates what America is. The novel captures post-9/11 U.S. in a brilliant satire . . . With the groundwork laid for an ending that will surprise readers, Native Believer offers no pat answers about being Muslim in America, but it does pose a lot of good questions." --Rain Taxi Review of Books Ali Eteraz's much-anticipated debut novel is the story of M., a supportive husband, adventureless dandy, lapsed believer, and second-generation immigrant who wants nothing more than to host parties and bring children into the world as full-fledged Americans. As M.'s life gradually fragments around him--a wife with a chronic illness; a best friend stricken with grief; a boss jeopardizing a respectable career--M. spins out into the pulsating underbelly of Philadelphia, where he encounters others grappling with fallout from the War on Terror. Among the pornographers and converts to Islam, punks and wrestlers, M. confronts his existential degradation and the life of a second-class citizen. Darkly comic, provocative, and insightful, Native Believer is a startling vision of the contemporary American experience and the human capacity to shape identity and belonging at all costs.



Plessy v Ferguson

Plessy v  Ferguson Author Thomas J. Davis Ph.D.
ISBN-10 9780313391880
Release 2012-07-19
Pages 238
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More than the story of one man's case, this book tells the story of entire generations of people marked as "mixed race" in America amid slavery and its aftermath, and being officially denied their multicultural identity and personal rights as a result.



The Jim Crow Encyclopedia

The Jim Crow Encyclopedia Author Nikki L. M. Brown
ISBN-10 0313341818
Release 2008-09-30
Pages 952
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This is the essential ready reference to understand American history post Reconstruction.



Shades of Freedom

Shades of Freedom Author A. Leon Higginbotham Jr.
ISBN-10 9780190284091
Release 1998-06-11
Pages 352
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Few individuals have had as great an impact on the law--both its practice and its history--as A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. A winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, he has distinguished himself over the decades both as a professor at Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard, and as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals. But Judge Higginbotham is perhaps best known as an authority on racism in America: not the least important achievement of his long career has been In the Matter of Color, the first volume in a monumental history of race and the American legal process. Published in 1978, this brilliant book has been hailed as the definitive account of racism, slavery, and the law in colonial America. Now, after twenty years, comes the long-awaited sequel. In Shades of Freedom, Higginbotham provides a magisterial account of the interaction between the law and racial oppression in America from colonial times to the present, demonstrating how the one agent that should have guaranteed equal treatment before the law--the judicial system--instead played a dominant role in enforcing the inferior position of blacks. The issue of racial inferiority is central to this volume, as Higginbotham documents how early white perceptions of black inferiority slowly became codified into law. Perhaps the most powerful and insightful writing centers on a pair of famous Supreme Court cases, which Higginbotham uses to portray race relations at two vital moments in our history. The Dred Scott decision of 1857 declared that a slave who had escaped to free territory must be returned to his slave owner. Chief Justice Roger Taney, in his notorious opinion for the majority, stated that blacks were "so inferior that they had no right which the white man was bound to respect." For Higginbotham, Taney's decision reflects the extreme state that race relations had reached just before the Civil War. And after the War and Reconstruction, Higginbotham reveals, the Courts showed a pervasive reluctance (if not hostility) toward the goal of full and equal justice for African Americans, and this was particularly true of the Supreme Court. And in the Plessy v. Ferguson decision, which Higginbotham terms "one of the most catastrophic racial decisions ever rendered," the Court held that full equality--in schooling or housing, for instance--was unnecessary as long as there were "separate but equal" facilities. Higginbotham also documents the eloquent voices that opposed the openly racist workings of the judicial system, from Reconstruction Congressman John R. Lynch to Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan to W. E. B. Du Bois, and he shows that, ironically, it was the conservative Supreme Court of the 1930s that began the attack on school segregation, and overturned the convictions of African Americans in the famous Scottsboro case. But today racial bias still dominates the nation, Higginbotham concludes, as he shows how in six recent court cases the public perception of black inferiority continues to persist. In Shades of Freedom, a noted scholar and celebrated jurist offers a work of magnificent scope, insight, and passion. Ranging from the earliest colonial times to the present, it is a superb work of history--and a mirror to the American soul.