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Lake Bonneville A Scientific Update

Lake Bonneville  A Scientific Update Author Charles G. Oviatt
ISBN-10 9780444635945
Release 2016-08-24
Pages 696
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Lake Bonneville: A Scientific Update showcases new information and interpretations about this important lake in the North American Great Basin, presenting a relatively complete summary of the evolving scientific ideas about the Pleistocene lake. A comprehensive book on Lake Bonneville has not been published since the masterpiece of G.K. Gilbert in 1890. Because of Gilbert’s work, Lake Bonneville has been the starting point for many studies of Quaternary paleolakes in many places throughout the world. Numerous journal articles, and a few books on specialized topics related to Lake Bonneville, have been published since the late 1800s, but here the editors compile the important data and perspectives of the early 21st century into a book that will be an essential reference for future generations. Scientific research on Lake Bonneville is vibrant today and will continue into the future. Makes the widespread and detailed literature on this well-known Pleistocene body of water accessible Gives expositions of the many famous and iconic landforms and deposits Contains over 300 illustrations, most in full color Contains chapters on many important topics, including stratigraphy, sedimentology, hydrology, geomorphology, geochronology, isostasy, geophysics, geochemistry, vegetation history, pollen, fishes, mammals, mountain glaciation, prehistoric humans, paleoclimate, remote sensing, and geoantiquities in the Bonneville basin



Neotectonism in the Indian Subcontinent

Neotectonism in the Indian Subcontinent Author K.S. Valdiya
ISBN-10 9780444639721
Release 2017-11-24
Pages 458
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An erudite work on tectonic resurgence in Late Quaternary time of the Indian subcontinent embracing India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh, Neotectonism in the Indian Subcontinent dwells on the causes and consequences of tectonic events that fashioned the landscape of a land characterized by a fragmented framework. The narratives on the structural and geomorphic developments during the morphogenic phase of the geodynamic history of the Indian subcontinent explain many phenomena. These include the tremendous height and spectacular structural-geomorphic architecture of the Himalaya, and the behaviour of wayward rivers in the sinking and rising Indo-Gangetic Plains. In addition are the shifting, deflection, piracy, and even disappearance of rivers and streams in the dry desertic terrane of western India, as well as the unique drainage pattern of the ruptured and rifted plateaus and coastal belts of Peninsular India. The formation of huge lakes due to river ponding in the stable continental shield in Karnataka is also explained. All of these phenomena are accompanied by profuse illustrations. Neotectonism in the Indian Subcontinent portrays the evolution of the extraordinary landforms and landscapes of the subcontinent, constituted by multiple terranes of contrasted lithostructural architecture and distinctive geomorphic layout—each with an altogether different geological history. It chronicles events of crustal unrest or tectonic turmoil manifested as displacement, subsidence, and uplift of the ground with bizarre drainage changes and episodic seismicity. This book caters to planners, engineers, and hazard managers, but also satisfies the curiosity of those who are interested in understanding the formation of the Indian subcontinent. Identifies areas and belts recurrently ravaged by geological hazards resulting from neotectonic activities Provides a wealth of information on neotectonic movements and consequent modification of landscape, drainage aberrations, and ground vulnerability, including references that also provide additional resources for those who seek to pursue comprehensive investigations Includes much new observation and refreshing interpretation to explain many of the striking landforms of the region



Ground Penetrating Radar in Sediments

Ground Penetrating Radar in Sediments Author C. S. Bristow
ISBN-10 1862391319
Release 2003-01-01
Pages 330
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Ground Penetrating Radar in Sediments has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Ground Penetrating Radar in Sediments also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Ground Penetrating Radar in Sediments book for free.



Shoreline Superelevation

Shoreline Superelevation Author Genevieve Atwood
ISBN-10 9781557917614
Release 2006
Pages 323
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Shoreline superelevation, the difference between still-water lake elevation and shoreline expressions, reported in this publication shows that shoreline expressions of shallow closed-basin lakes define a surface that is neither essentially horizontal nor a still-water lake elevation.



Tectonic Geomorphology

Tectonic Geomorphology Author Douglas W. Burbank
ISBN-10 9781444345049
Release 2011-11-02
Pages 480
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Tectonic geomorphology is the study of the interplay between tectonic and surface processes that shape the landscape in regions of active deformation and at time scales ranging from days to millions of years. Over the past decade, recent advances in the quantification of both rates and the physical basis of tectonic and surface processes have underpinned an explosion of new research in the field of tectonic geomorphology. Modern tectonic geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from studies of geomorphology, seismology, geochronology, structure, geodesy, stratigraphy, meteorology and Quaternary science. While integrating new insights and highlighting controversies from the ten years of research since the 1st edition, this 2nd edition of Tectonic Geomorphology reviews the fundamentals of the subject, including the nature of faulting and folding, the creation and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation, chronological techniques that are used to date events and quantify rates, geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation, and paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation. Overall, this book focuses on the current understanding of the dynamic interplay between surface processes and active tectonics. As it ranges from the timescales of individual earthquakes to the growth and decay of mountain belts, this book provides a timely synthesis of modern research for upper-level undergraduate and graduate earth science students and for practicing geologists. Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com/go/burbank/geomorphology.



Earth Surface Processes

Earth Surface Processes Author Philip A. Allen
ISBN-10 9781444313567
Release 2009-05-27
Pages 416
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Earth Surface Processes is an introductory text for those studying the dynamics of fluid and sediment transport in the environments, in the context of both present-day patterns as well as the environmental changes decipherable in the geological record. The book is divided into two parts. The first deals with the global-scale aspects of the earth's surface system. The second part focuses on the physical underpinnings for fluid and sediment transport in a number of settings, found at the earth's surface and in its oceans. Earth Surface Processes fits into the literature of the broad holistic discipline of 'Earth System Science.' The author illustrates the physical principles of earth's surface processes and explains the relevant theories by quantitative practical exercises. The pioneering textbook on the "new sedimentology" One of the first textbooks to adopt the Earth Systems approach to geology, developed at Penn State and Stanford Should reinvigorate more traditional courses in physical sedimentology and dynamical sedimentology Successfully marries the innovative holistic approach to Earth Systems with the traditional reductionist approach to sedimentary processes Explains both the global-scale Earth Surface System and the fluid dynamics and sedimentary transport processes that underlie this Quantitative approach is reinforced with worked examples and solutions Richly illustrated with original diagrams and a colour plate section



Volcanic Lakes

Volcanic Lakes Author Dmitri Rouwet
ISBN-10 9783642368332
Release 2015-03-02
Pages 533
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This book aims to give an overview on the present state of volcanic lake research, covering topics such as volcano monitoring, the chemistry, dynamics and degassing of acidic crater lakes, mass-energy-chemical-isotopic balance approaches, limnology and degassing of Nyos-type lakes, the impact on the human and natural environment, the eruption products and impact of crater lake breaching eruptions, numerical modeling of gas clouds and lake eruptions, thermo-hydro-mechanical and deformation modeling, CO2 fluxes from lakes, volcanic lakes observed from space, biological activity, continuous monitoring techniques, and some aspects more. We hope to offer an updated manual on volcanic lake research, providing classic research methods, and point towards a more high-tech approach of future volcanic lake research and continuous monitoring.



The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology

The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology Author Kenneth J Gregory
ISBN-10 9781412929059
Release 2011-06-22
Pages 610
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Geomorphology is the study of the Earth's diverse physical land-surface features and the dynamic processes that shape these features. Examining natural and anthropogenic processes, The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology is a comprehensive exposition of the fundamentals of geomorphology that examines form, process, and applications of the discipline. Organized into five substantive sections, the Handbook is an overview of: * Foundations and Relevance: including the nature and scope of geomorphology; the origins and development of geomorphology; the role and character of theory in geomorphology; geomorphology and environmental management; and geomorphology and society * Techniques and Approaches: including observations and experiments; geomorphological mapping; the significance of models; process and form; dating surfaces and sediment; remote sensing in geomorphology; GIS in geomorphology; biogeomorphology; human activity * Process and Environment: including the evolution of regolith; weathering; fluids, flows and fluxes; sediment transport and deposition; hill slopes; riverine environments; glacial geomorphology; periglacial environments; coastal environments; aeolian environments; tropical environments; karst and karst processes * Environmental Change: including landscape evolution and tectonics; interpreting quaternary environments; environmental change; disturbance and responses to geomorphic systems * Conclusion: including challenges and perspectives; and a concluding review The Handbook has contributions from 48 international authors and was initially organized by the International Association of Geomorphologists. This will be a much-used and much-cited reference for researchers in Geomorphology, Physical Geography and the Environmental Sciences.



Fundamentals of Geomorphology

Fundamentals of Geomorphology Author Richard John Huggett
ISBN-10 9781317378389
Release 2016-11-21
Pages 544
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The new fourth edition of Fundamentals of Geomorphology continues to provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject by discussing the latest developments in the field, as well as covering the basics of Earth surface forms and processes. The revised edition has an improved logically cohesive structure, added recent material on Quaternary environments and landscapes, landscape evolution and tectonics, as well as updated information in fast-changing areas such as the application of dating techniques, digital terrain modelling, historical contingency, preglacial landforms, neocatastrophism, and biogeomorphology. The book begins with a consideration of the nature of geomorphology, process and form, history, and geomorphic systems, and moves on to discuss: Endogenic processes: structural landforms associated with plate tectonics and those associated with volcanoes, impact craters, and folds, faults, and joints. Exogenic processes: landforms resulting from, or influenced by, the exogenic agencies of weathering, running water, flowing ice and meltwater, ground ice and frost, the wind, and the sea; landforms developed on limestone; and long-term geomorphology, a discussion of ancient landforms, including palaeosurfaces, stagnant landscape features, and evolutionary aspects of landscape change. Featuring over 400 illustrations, diagrams, and tables, Fundamentals of Geomorphology provides a stimulating and innovative perspective on the key topics and debates within the field of geomorphology. Written in an accessible and lively manner, and providing guides to further reading, chapter summaries, and an extensive glossary of key terms, this is an indispensable undergraduate level textbook for students of physical geography.



Camels Back Cave

Camels Back Cave Author Dave N. Schmitt
ISBN-10 0874808413
Release 2005
Pages 281
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Covers an isolated limestone ridge on the southern edge of the Great Salt Lake Desert, where archaeologists have exposed a series of stratified deposits spanning the entire Holocene era.



Principles and Dynamics of the Critical Zone

Principles and Dynamics of the Critical Zone Author
ISBN-10 9780444634122
Release 2015-06-18
Pages 674
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Principles and Dynamics of the Critical Zone is an invaluable resource for undergraduate and graduate courses and an essential tool for researchers developing cutting-edge proposals. It provides a process-based description of the Critical Zone, a place that The National Research Council (2001) defines as the "heterogeneous, near surface environment in which complex interactions involving rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms regulate the natural habitat and determine the availability of life-sustaining resources." This text provides a summary of Critical Zone research and outcomes from the NSF funded Critical Zone Observatories, providing a process-based description of the Critical Zone in a wide range of environments with a specific focus on the important linkages that exist amongst the processes in each zone. This book will be useful to all scientists and students conducting research on the Critical Zone within and outside the Critical Zone Observatory Network, as well as scientists and students in the geosciences – atmosphere, geomorphology, geology and pedology. The first text to address the principles and concepts of the Critical Zone A comprehensive approach to the processes responsible for the development and structure of the Critical Zone in a number of environments An essential tool for undergraduate and graduate students, and researchers developing cutting-edge proposals



Methodological Challenges in Nature Culture and Environmental History Research

Methodological Challenges in Nature Culture and Environmental History Research Author Jocelyn Thorpe
ISBN-10 9781317353560
Release 2016-11-10
Pages 340
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This book examines the challenges and possibilities of conducting cultural environmental history research today. Disciplinary commitments certainly influence the questions scholars ask and the ways they seek out answers, but some methodological challenges go beyond the boundaries of any one discipline. The book examines: how to account for the fact that humans are not the only actors in history yet dominate archival records; how to attend to the non-visual senses when traditional sources offer only a two-dimensional, non-sensory version of the past; how to decolonize research in and beyond the archives; and how effectively to use sources and means of communication made available in the digital age. This book will be a valuable resource for those interested in environmental history and politics, sustainable development and historical geography.



Geomorphological Fieldwork

Geomorphological Fieldwork Author
ISBN-10 9780444634184
Release 2014-12-06
Pages 286
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Geomorphological Fieldwork addresses a topic that always remains popular within the geosciences and environmental science. More specifically, the volume conveys a growing legacy of field-based learning for young geomorphologists that can be used as a student book for field-based university courses and postgraduate research requiring fieldwork or field schools. The editors have much experience of field-based learning within geomorphology and extend this to physical geography. The topics covered are relevant to basic geomorphology as well as applied approaches in environmental and cultural geomorphology. The book integrates a physical-human approach to geography, but focuses on physical geography and geomorphology from an integrated field-based geoscience perspective. Addresses fluvial and karst landscapes in depth Focuses on field-based learning as well as educational geomorphology Conveys experiential knowledge in international contexts



Planetary Surface Processes

Planetary Surface Processes Author H. Jay Melosh
ISBN-10 9781139498302
Release 2011-08-25
Pages
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Planetary Surface Processes is the first advanced textbook to cover the full range of geologic processes that shape the surfaces of planetary-scale bodies. Using a modern, quantitative approach, this book reconsiders geologic processes outside the traditional terrestrial context. It highlights processes that are contingent upon Earth's unique circumstances and processes that are universal. For example, it shows explicitly that equations predicting the velocity of a river are dependent on gravity: traditional geomorphology textbooks fail to take this into account. This textbook is a one-stop source of information on planetary surface processes, providing readers with the necessary background to interpret new data from NASA, ESA and other space missions. Based on a course taught by the author at the University of Arizona for 25 years, it is aimed at advanced students, and is also an invaluable resource for researchers, professional planetary scientists and space-mission engineers.



The Wasatch Fault

The Wasatch Fault Author Sandra N. Eldredge
ISBN-10 9781557913876
Release 1996-01-22
Pages 17
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A beautifully designed and easy to understand publication discussing the geologic history of the Wasatch Fault and possible dangers it poses to anyone living nearby. This is a perfect introduction to the fault for anyone of all ages.



Paleolimnology

Paleolimnology Author Andrew S. Cohen
ISBN-10 0195350898
Release 2003-05-29
Pages 528
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This text, written by a leading researcher in the field, describes the origin and formation of lakes in order to give context to the question of how lacustrine deposits form. It explains the process of sedimentation in lakes and the chemistry of those deposits and describes how the age of lake deposits are determined. Additionally, this book shows how different groups of fossils are used in interpreting the paleontological record of lakes. In order to illustrate the more synthetic approaches to interpreting the history of lakes, the author also discusses such special topics as lake-level history, lake evolution, and the impact of environmental change on lakes.



Index for

Index for Author
ISBN-10 9780080880129
Release 1999-10-15
Pages 448
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This series provides a venue for longer reviews of current advances in geophysics. Written at a level accessible to graduate students, the articles serve to broaden knowledge of various fields and may be useful in courses and seminars.