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Landesque Capital

Landesque Capital Author N Thomas Håkansson
ISBN-10 9781315425672
Release 2016-06-16
Pages 281
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This book is the first comprehensive, global treatment of landesque capital, a widespread concept used to understand anthropogenic landscapes that serve important economic, social, and ritual purposes. Spanning the disciplines of anthropology, human ecology, geography, archaeology, and history, chapters combine theoretical rigor with in-depth empirical studies of major landscape modifications from ancient to contemporary times. They assess not only degradation but also the social, political, and economic institutions and contexts that make sustainability possible. Offering tightly edited, original contributions from leading scholars, this book will have a lasting influence on the study long-term human-environment relations in the human and natural sciences.



Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas

Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas Author Robin Grossinger
ISBN-10 9780520951723
Release 2012-03-12
Pages 240
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How has California’s landscape changed? What did now-familiar places look like during prior centuries? What can the past teach us about designing future landscapes? The Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas explores these questions by taking readers on a dazzling visual tour of Napa Valley from the early 1800s onward—a forgotten land of brilliant wildflower fields, lush wetlands, and grand oak savannas. Robin Grossinger weaves together rarely-seen historical maps, travelers’s accounts, photographs, and paintings to reconstruct early Napa Valley and document its physical transformation over the past two centuries. The Atlas provides a fascinating new perspective on this iconic landscape, showing the natural heritage that has enabled the agricultural success of the region today. The innovative research of Grossinger and his historical ecology team allows us to visualize the past in unprecedented detail, improving our understanding of the living landscapes we inhabit and suggesting strategies to increase their health and resilience in the future.



Cultural Forests of the Amazon

Cultural Forests of the Amazon Author William L. Balée
ISBN-10 9780817317867
Release 2013-08-20
Pages 268
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Winner of the Society for Economic Botany's Mary W. Klinger Book Award. Cultural Forests of the Amazon is a comprehensive and diverse account of how indigenous people transformed landscapes and managed resources in the most extensive region of tropical forests in the world. Until recently, most scholars and scientists, as well as the general public, thought indigenous people had a minimal impact on Amazon forests, once considered to be total wildernesses. William Balé e’ s research, conducted over a span of three decades, shows a more complicated truth. In Cultural Forests of the Amazon, he argues that indigenous people, past and present, have time and time again profoundly transformed nature into culture. Moreover, they have done so using their traditional knowledge and technology developed over thousands of years. Balé e demonstrates the inestimable value of indigenous knowledge in providing guideposts for a potentially less destructive future for environments and biota in the Amazon. He shows that we can no longer think about species and landscape diversity in any tropical forest without taking into account the intricacies of human history and the impact of all forms of knowledge and technology. Balé e describes the development of his historical ecology approach in Amazonia, along with important material on little-known forest dwellers and their habitats, current thinking in Amazonian historical ecology, and a narrative of his own dialogue with the Amazon and its people.



Tropical Forests Of Oceania

Tropical Forests Of Oceania Author Joshua A. Bell
ISBN-10 9781925022735
Release 2015-08-31
Pages 263
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The tropical forests of Oceania are an enduring source of concern for indigenous communities, for the migrants who move to them, for the states that encompass them within their borders, for the multilateral institutions and aid agencies, and for the non-governmental organisations that focus on their conservation. Grounded in the perspective of political ecology, contributors to this volume approach forests as socially alive spaces produced by a confluence of local histories and global circulations. In doing so, they collectively explore the multiple ways in which these forests come into view and therefore into being. Exploring the local dynamics within and around these forests provides an insight into regional issues that have global resonance. Intertwined as they are with cosmological beliefs and livelihoods, as sites of biodiversity and Western desire, these forests have been and are still being transformed by the interaction of foreign and local entities. Focusing on case studies from Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and the Gambier Islands, this volume brings new perspectives on how Pacific Islanders continue to creatively engage with the various processes at play in and around their forests.



Maya Forest Garden

Maya Forest Garden Author Anabel Ford
ISBN-10 9781611329988
Release 2015-06-30
Pages 260
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The conventional wisdom says that the devolution of Classic Maya civilization occurred because its population grew too large and dense to be supported by primitive neotropical farming methods, resulting in debilitating famines and internecine struggles. Using research on contemporary Maya farming techniques and important new archaeological research, Ford and Nigh refute this Malthusian explanation of events in ancient Central America and posit a radical alternative theory. The authors show that ancient Maya farmers developed ingenious, sustainable woodland techniques to cultivate numerous food plants (including the staple maize); examine both contemporary tropical farming techniques and the archaeological record (particularly regarding climate) to reach their conclusions; make the argument that these ancient techniques, still in use today, can support significant populations over long periods of time.



Social and Ecological History of the Pyrenees

Social and Ecological History of the Pyrenees Author Ismael Vaccaro
ISBN-10 9781315420073
Release 2016-06-03
Pages 271
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This major work of historical ecology advances the integration of research on environmental and social systems, contributing important lessons for contemporary natural resource policy and management. A diverse, international region, the Pyrenees has been characterized as a quintessential example of rural areas across Europe and North America. The authors use qualitative and quantitative methods from economics, history, anthropology, and ecological science to integrate human agency and ecology across a landscape that moved from agricultural and pastoral production to industrialization, then experienced acute depopulation, and now is becoming a focus of conservation and tourism. The book shows how today’s most pressing resource policy challenges are best illuminated by this broad, long-term understanding of humans and landscapes.



Sacred Geographies of Ancient Amazonia

Sacred Geographies of Ancient Amazonia Author Denise P Schaan
ISBN-10 9781315420523
Release 2016-06-16
Pages 233
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The legendary El Dorado—the city of gold—remains a mere legend, but astonishing new discoveries are revealing a major civilization in ancient Amazonia that was more complex than anyone previously dreamed. Scholars have long insisted that the Amazonian ecosystem placed severe limits on the size and complexity of its ancient cultures, but leading researcher Denise Schaan reverses that view, synthesizing exciting new evidence of large-scale land and resource management to tell a new history of indigenous Amazonia. Schaan also engages fundamental debates about the development of social complexity and the importance of ancient Amazonia from a global perspective. This innovative, interdisciplinary book is a major contribution to the study of human-environment relations, social complexity, and past and present indigenous societies.



The International Handbook of Political Ecology

The International Handbook of Political Ecology Author Raymond L Bryant
ISBN-10 9780857936172
Release 2015-08-28
Pages 704
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The International Handbook of Political Ecology features chapters by leading scholars from around the world in a unique collection exploring the multi-disciplinary field of political ecology. This landmark volume canvasses key developments, topics, iss



The Ten Thousand Year Fever

The Ten Thousand Year Fever Author Loretta A Cormier
ISBN-10 9781315417073
Release 2016-06-16
Pages 241
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Malaria is one of the oldest recorded diseases in human history, and its 10,000-year relationship to primates can teach us why it will be one of the most serious threats to humanity in the 21st century. In this pathbreaking book Loretta Cormier integrates a wide range of data from molecular biology, ethnoprimatology, epidemiology, ecology, anthropology, and other fields to reveal the intimate relationships between culture and environment that shape the trajectory of a parasite. She argues against the entrenched distinction between human and non-human malarias, using ethnoprimatology to develop a new understanding of cross-species exchange. She also shows how current human-environment interactions, including deforestation and development, create the potential for new forms of malaria to threaten human populations. This book is a model of interdisciplinary integration that will be essential reading in fields from anthropology and biology to public health.



Precolumbian Water Management

Precolumbian Water Management Author Lisa Joyce Lucero
ISBN-10 0816523142
Release 2006
Pages 304
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Among ancient Mesoamerican and Southwestern peoples, water was as essential as maize for sustenance and was a driving force in the development of complex society. Control of water shaped the political, economic, and religious landscape of the ancient Americas, yet it is often overlooked in Precolumbian studies. Now one volume offers the latest thinking on water systems and their place within the ancient physical and mental language of the region. Precolumbian Water Management examines water management from both economic and symbolic perspectives. Water management facilities, settlement patterns, shrines, and water-related imagery associated with civic-ceremonial and residential architecture provide evidence that water systems pervade all aspects of ancient society. Through analysis of such data, the contributors seek to combine an understanding of imagery and the religious aspects of water with its functional components, thereby presenting a unified perspective of how water was conceived, used, and represented in ancient greater Mesoamerica. The collection boasts broad chronological and geographical coverageÑfrom the irrigation networks of Teotihuacan to the use of ritual water technology at Casas GrandesÑthat shows how procurement and storage systems were adapted to local conditions. The articles consider the mechanisms that were used to build upon the sacredness of water to enhance political authority through time and space and show that water was not merely an essential natural resource but an important spiritual one as well, and that its manipulation was socially far more complex than might appear at first glance. As these papers reveal, an understanding of materials associated with water can contribute much to the ways that archaeologists study ancient cultural systems. Precolumbian Water Management underscores the importance of water management research and the need to include it in archaeological projects of all types.



Islands in the Rainforest

Islands in the Rainforest Author Stéphen Rostain
ISBN-10 9781598746341
Release 2012-11-15
Pages 277
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Covers the area between the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, the Cassiquiare Canal, and the Atlantic Ocean (Guyana, French Guiana, Suriname, parts of Brazil, parts of Venezuela).



How Chiefs Come to Power

How Chiefs Come to Power Author Timothy K. Earle
ISBN-10 0804728569
Release 1997
Pages 250
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This book is basically about power-how people came to acquire it and the implications that contrasting paths to power had for the development of societies. Earle argues that chiefdoms, being a regional polity with governance over a population of a few thousand to tens of thousands of people, and with some social stratification, possessed the same fundamental dynamics as those of states, and that the origin of states is to be understood in the emergence and development of chiefdoms. His arguments are developed by three case studies-Denmark during the Neolithic and early Bronze Age (2300-1300) BC, the high Andes of Peru from the early chiefdoms through the Inka conquest (AD 500-1534), and Hawai'i from early settlement to its incorporation in the world economy (AD 800-1824). After summarizing the cultural history of the three societies over a thousand years, he considers the sources of chiefly power-the economy, military power and ideology-and how these sources were linked together.



Mountain Ice and Water

Mountain Ice and Water Author John F. Shroder
ISBN-10 9780444637888
Release 2016-11-18
Pages 402
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Mountain Ice and Water: Investigations of the Hydrologic Cycle in Alpine Environments is a new volume of papers reviewed and edited by John Shroder, Emeritus Professor of Geography and Geology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA, and Greg Greenwood, Director of the Mountain Research Initiative from Bern, Switzerland. Chapters in this book were derived from research papers that were delivered at the Perth III Conference on Mountains of our Future Earth in Scotland in October 2015. The conference was established to help develop the knowledge necessary to respond effectively to the risks and opportunities of global environmental change and to support transformations toward global sustainability in the coming decades. To this end, the conference and book have investigated the future situation in mountains from three points of view. (1) Dynamic Planet: Observing, explaining, understanding, and projecting Earth, environmental, and societal system trends, drivers, and processes and their interactions to anticipate global thresholds and risks, (2) Global Sustainable Development: Increasing knowledge for sustainable, secure, and fair stewardship of biodiversity, food, water, health, energy, materials, and other ecosystem services, and (3) Transformations towards Sustainability: Understanding transformation processes and options, assessing how these relate to human values, emerging technologies and social and economic development pathways, and evaluating strategies for governing and managing the global environment across sectors and scales. Derived from research papers delivered at the Perth III Conference on Mountains of our Future Earth in Scotland in October 2015 Helps develop the knowledge necessary for responding effectively in coming decades to the risks and opportunities of global environmental change and tactics for global sustainability Provides the research community working on global change in mountains with a broader framework established by the Future Earth initiative



Methods in World History

Methods in World History Author Arne Jarrick
ISBN-10 9789188168498
Release 2016-12-20
Pages 256
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Methods in World History is the first international volume that systematically addresses a number of methodological problems specific to the field of world history. Prompted by a lack of applicable works, the authors advocate a considerable sharpening of the tools used within the field of study. Theories constructed on poor foundations run an obvious risk of reinforcing flawed assumptions, and of propping up other, more ideological, constructions. The dedicated critical approach outlined in this volume helps to mitigate such risks. Each author addresses a particular issue of method – for source criticism, archaeological evidence or estimates of economies for example – discussing the problems, giving practical examples, and offering solutions and ways of overcoming the difficulties involved. The perspectives are varied, the criticism focussed, and a common theme of coalescence is maintained throughout. This unique anthology will be of great use to advanced scholars of world history, and to students entering the field for the first time.



Introduction to Cultural Ecology

Introduction to Cultural Ecology Author Mark Q. Sutton
ISBN-10 9780759123304
Release 2013-12-12
Pages 452
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Introduction to Cultural Ecology, Third Edition, familiarizes students with the foundations of the field and provides a framework for exploring what other cultures can teach us about human/environment relationships.



Roots of Conflict

Roots of Conflict Author Patrick Vinton Kirch
ISBN-10 1934691267
Release 2011
Pages 199
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"Roots of Conflict presents the efforts of a team of social and natural scientists to understand the complex, systemic linkages between land, climate, crops, human populations, and their cultural structures. The research group has focused on what might seem to some an unlikely locale to investigate a set of problems with worldwide significance: the Hawaiian Islands. Though it is perhaps the most isolated archipelago on Earth, Hawaii is a model system for teasing out key connections between land, agriculture, and society." --Publisher.



Becoming Earth

Becoming Earth Author Anne Reinertsen
ISBN-10 9789463004299
Release 2016-03-22
Pages 180
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Becoming earth is about how we can write and tell stories in a way that allows us to collaborate and be stewards and partners of the (natural) world – our earth – rather than dominators of it. That is what this assemblage is about: about trying to take seriously the minor politics of sensing, experimenting with questions of attending and attuning to difference, contestation, nomadism, relationality, and permeability in sensing cultivating muchness, newness, communities of acceptance and decision making. Going beyond the binaries, dualisms, instrumentalist criteria, etc., and supplying third space conceptions of agency not tied to human action alone, but rather examining human and more-than human relational assemblages of affecting and being affected. The tasks for educators becoming not merely people who pass on traditions, institutions, systems and/or structures, but prepare for future contingent events ultimately creates vital pedagogies of many prospects in our classrooms and exceeds forms of contracts between generations. These are embodied ecologies and/or enacting ecologies in practice showing the practical and political strength of new materialisms and presenting its potential and usefulness to simultaneously work and analyse local and global political strategies and sustainability. Making virtuality productive as a form of life: our wonderings are thus always stronger than our assertions. The sometimes fierce stories in this book might light some paths.