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Morning of Fire

Morning of Fire Author Scott Ridley
ISBN-10 9780062020192
Release 2010-11-02
Pages 464
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Morning of Fire by Scott Ridley is the thrilling story of 18th century American explorer and expeditioner John Kedrick as he journeyed for land and trade in the Pacific. Set against the backdrop of one of the most exciting and uncertain times in world history, John Kendrick’s odyssey aboard his sailing ship Lady Washington carries him from the shores of New England across the unexplored waters of the Pacific Northwest to the contentious ports of China and the war-ravaged islands of Hawaii, all while avoiding intrigues and traps from the British and the Spanish. Morning of Fire is riveting American and naval history that brings the era of George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson gloriously alive—a tale of danger, adventure, and discovery that fans of Nathaniel Philbrick will not want to miss.



The United States between China and Japan

The United States between China and Japan Author Victor Teo
ISBN-10 9781443865050
Release 2014-07-24
Pages 502
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From its insistence that Japan should favour diplomatic normalization with the Republic of China over the People’s Republic of China in 1952, through its role, via the Security Treaty, of keeping the ‘cap in the bottle’ of Japanese militarism, to weighing in on the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands dispute between China and Japan, the United States has played a pivotal, and at times controversial, role in the development of China-Japan relations since the end of World War II. By extension, US influence on China-Taiwan and Taiwan-Japan relations, in addition to its impact on the efforts of various actors to construct a Northeast Asian regional community, continues to pose important questions about the nature of the US role in East Asia in the 21st century. This volume provides a multi-faceted overview of the nature of America’s interaction in East Asia since the end of the war, and highlights the obstacles to improved bilateral and regional integration. The contributors offer a range of perspectives from their respective US, European, and East Asian vantage points, and point to the ongoing and prominent involvement of the US in the region for the foreseeable future.



Attack of the HMS Nimrod

Attack of the HMS Nimrod Author J. North Conway
ISBN-10 9781625849458
Release 2014-05-13
Pages 144
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On the morning of June 13, 1814, the British warship HMS" Nimrod" attacked the town of Wareham, Massachusetts. As a center for shipbuilding and iron, Wareham was a perfect target for the British fleet. When the lead barge deceptively appeared with a white flag at its bow, Wareham never suspected anything but a truce and was ill prepared for the attack. A raiding party with six barges and two hundred men burned the town's cotton mill, destroyed its vessels and took its citizens as hostages. When "Nimrod" tried to flee the shores, it ran aground and had to throw its cannons and guns overboard in order to lighten its load and sail away. Wareham was left smoldering in its wake. Follow authors J. North Conway and Jesse Dubuc as they trace the attack from the initial spotting of the British fleet to the discovery of the lost "Nimrod "cannons.



The Great Ocean

The Great Ocean Author David Igler
ISBN-10 9780199914968
Release 2013-03-18
Pages 336
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The Pacific of the early eighteenth century was not a single ocean but a vast and varied waterscape, a place of baffling complexity, with 25,000 islands and seemingly endless continental shorelines. But with the voyages of Captain James Cook, global attention turned to the Pacific, and European and American dreams of scientific exploration, trade, and empire grew dramatically. By the time of the California gold rush, the Pacific's many shores were fully integrated into world markets-and world consciousness. The Great Ocean draws on hundreds of documented voyages--some painstakingly recorded by participants, some only known by archeological remains or indigenous memory--as a window into the commercial, cultural, and ecological upheavals following Cook's exploits, focusing in particular on the eastern Pacific in the decades between the 1770s and the 1840s. Beginning with the expansion of trade as seen via the travels of William Shaler, captain of the American Brig Lelia Byrd, historian David Igler uncovers a world where voyagers, traders, hunters, and native peoples met one another in episodes often marked by violence and tragedy. Igler describes how indigenous communities struggled against introduced diseases that cut through the heart of their communities; how the ordeal of Russian Timofei Tarakanov typified the common practice of taking hostages and prisoners; how Mary Brewster witnessed first-hand the bloody "great hunt" that decimated otters, seals, and whales; how Adelbert von Chamisso scoured the region, carefully compiling his notes on natural history; and how James Dwight Dana rivaled Charles Darwin in his pursuit of knowledge on a global scale. These stories--and the historical themes that tie them together--offer a fresh perspective on the oceanic worlds of the eastern Pacific. Ambitious and broadly conceived, The Great Ocean is the first book to weave together American, oceanic, and world history in a path-breaking portrait of the Pacific world.



Sharpe s Gold

Sharpe s Gold Author Bernard Cornwell
ISBN-10 0451213416
Release 2004
Pages 256
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In order to finance the Duke of Wellington's next campaign against Napoleon and his forces, Richard Sharpe undertakes to steal a fortune in gold and must outwit both Spanish guerrillas and the French in the treacherous terrain of the Portuguese hills. Reprint.



Leviathan The History of Whaling in America

Leviathan  The History of Whaling in America Author Eric Jay Dolin
ISBN-10 9780393066661
Release 2008-07-17
Pages 512
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A Los Angeles Times Best Non-Fiction Book of 2007 A Boston Globe Best Non-Fiction Book of 2007 Amazon.com Editors pick as one of the 10 best history books of 2007 Winner of the 2007 John Lyman Award for U. S. Maritime History, given by the North American Society for Oceanic History "The best history of American whaling to come along in a generation." —Nathaniel Philbrick The epic history of the "iron men in wooden boats" who built an industrial empire through the pursuit of whales. "To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme," Herman Melville proclaimed, and this absorbing history demonstrates that few things can capture the sheer danger and desperation of men on the deep sea as dramatically as whaling. Eric Jay Dolin begins his vivid narrative with Captain John Smith's botched whaling expedition to the New World in 1614. He then chronicles the rise of a burgeoning industry—from its brutal struggles during the Revolutionary period to its golden age in the mid-1800s when a fleet of more than 700 ships hunted the seas and American whale oil lit the world, to its decline as the twentieth century dawned. This sweeping social and economic history provides rich and often fantastic accounts of the men themselves, who mutinied, murdered, rioted, deserted, drank, scrimshawed, and recorded their experiences in journals and memoirs. Containing a wealth of naturalistic detail on whales, Leviathan is the most original and stirring history of American whaling in many decades.



The King and Queen of Malibu The True Story of the Battle for Paradise

The King and Queen of Malibu  The True Story of the Battle for Paradise Author David K. Randall
ISBN-10 9780393292930
Release 2016-03-02
Pages 256
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New York Times best-selling author David K. Randall spins a remarkable tale of the American West and the desire of one couple to preserve paradise. Frederick and May Rindge, the unlikely couple whose love story propelled Malibu’s transformation from an untamed ranch in the middle of nowhere to a paradise seeded with movie stars, are at the heart of this story of American grit and determinism. He was a Harvard-trained confidant of presidents; she was a poor Midwestern farmer’s daughter raised to be suspicious of the seasons. Yet the bond between them would shape history. The newly married couple reached Los Angeles in 1887 when it was still a frontier, and within a few years Frederick, the only heir to an immense Boston fortune, became one of the wealthiest men in the state. After his sudden death in 1905, May spent the next thirty years fighting off some of the most powerful men in the country—as well as fissures within her own family—to preserve Malibu as her private kingdom. Her struggle, one of the longest over land in California history, would culminate in a landmark Supreme Court decision and lead to the creation of the Pacific Coast Highway. The King and Queen of Malibu traces the path of one family as the country around them swept off the last vestiges of the Civil War and moved into what we would recognize as the modern age. The story of Malibu ranges from the halls of Harvard to the Old West in New Mexico to the beginnings of San Francisco’s counter culture amid the Gilded Age, and culminates in the glamour of early Hollywood—all during the brief sliver of history in which the advent of railroads and the automobile traversed a beckoning American frontier and anything seemed possible.



The Death and Life of Monterey Bay

The Death and Life of Monterey Bay Author Stephen R Palumbi
ISBN-10 9781597269872
Release 2011-01-26
Pages 224
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Anyone who has ever stood on the shores of Monterey Bay, watching the rolling ocean waves and frolicking otters, knows it is a unique place. But even residents on this idyllic California coast may not realize its full history. Monterey began as a natural paradise, but became the poster child for industrial devastation in John Steinbeck’s Cannery Row,and is now one of the most celebrated shorelines in the world. It is a remarkable story of life, death, and revival—told here for the first time in all its stunning color and bleak grays. The Death and Life of Monterey Bay begins in the eighteenth century when Spanish and French explorers encountered a rocky shoreline brimming with life—raucous sea birds, abundant sea otters, barking sea lions, halibut the size of wagon wheels,waters thick with whales. A century and a half later, many of the sea creatures had disappeared, replaced by sardine canneries that sickened residents with their stench but kept the money flowing. When the fish ran out and the climate turned,the factories emptied and the community crumbled. But today,both Monterey’s economy and wildlife are resplendent. How did it happen? The answer is deceptively simple: through the extraordinary acts of ordinary people. The Death and Life of Monterey Bay is the biography of a place, but also of the residents who reclaimed it. Monterey is thriving because of an eccentric mayor who wasn’t afraid to use pistols, axes, or the force of law to protect her coasts. It is because of fishermen who love their livelihood, scientists who are fascinated by the sea’s mysteries, and philanthropists and community leaders willing to invest in a world-class aquarium. The shores of Monterey Bay revived because of human passion—passion that enlivens every page of this hopeful book.



Target Tokyo Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor

Target Tokyo  Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor Author James M. Scott
ISBN-10 9780393246766
Release 2015-04-13
Pages 640
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Finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History. "Like Lauren Hillebrand's Unbroken…Target Tokyo brings to life an indelible era." —Ben Cosgrove, The Daily Beast In December 1941, as American forces tallied the dead at Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt gathered with his senior military counselors to plan an ambitious counterstrike against the heart of the Japanese Empire: Tokyo. Four months later, on April 18, 1942, sixteen U.S. Army bombers under the command of daredevil pilot Jimmy Doolittle lifted off from the deck of the USS Hornet on a one-way mission to pummel the enemy’s factories, refineries, and dockyards and then escape to Free China. For Roosevelt, the raid was a propaganda victory, a potent salve to heal a wounded nation. In Japan, outraged over the deaths of innocent civilians—including children—military leaders launched an ill-fated attempt to seize Midway that would turn the tide of the war. But it was the Chinese who suffered the worst, victims of a retaliatory campaign by the Japanese Army that claimed an estimated 250,000 lives and saw families drowned in wells, entire towns burned, and communities devastated by bacteriological warfare. At the center of this incredible story is Doolittle, the son of an Alaskan gold prospector, a former boxer, and brilliant engineer who earned his doctorate from MIT. Other fascinating characters populate this gripping narrative, including Chiang Kai-shek, Lieutenant General Joseph “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell, and the feisty Vice Admiral William “Bull” Halsey Jr. Here, too, are indelible portraits of the young pilots, navigators, and bombardiers, many of them little more than teenagers, who raised their hands to volunteer for a mission from which few expected to return. Most of the bombers ran out of fuel and crashed. Captured raiders suffered torture and starvation in Japan’s notorious POW camps. Others faced a harrowing escape across China—via boat, rickshaw, and foot—with the Japanese Army in pursuit. Based on scores of never-before-published records drawn from archives across four continents as well as new interviews with survivors, Target Tokyo is World War II history of the highest order: a harrowing adventure story that also serves as a pivotal reexamination of one of America’s most daring military operations.



The Rise and Fall of the Sugar King

The Rise and Fall of the Sugar King Author Geoffrey Owen Cobb
ISBN-10 197841546X
Release 2017-10-19
Pages 350
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The history of Williamsburg, Brooklyn and the rise of the American sugar industry are so intertwined that it is impossible to separate them. The Havemeyer family built the world's largest sugar refinery that would be renamed Domino, but also constructed a sugar empire that made Henry Havemeyer one of the richest and most powerful men in America. This book chronicles Henry Havemeyer's ascent and reign as the "Sugar King" of the United States. It is a tale of greed, crime, wealth, power and corruption, but it is also the story of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The Rise and Fall of the Sugar King, based on extensive historical research, recounts the lives of a half dozen Williamsburg residents during the years from 1844 to 1909.



Pirate Haiku

Pirate Haiku Author Michael P. Spradlin
ISBN-10 1440509832
Release 2010-10-14
Pages 192
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The ship sails avast! I have lost the map, mateys! No shaking booty! Come sail the seven seas aboard the notorious Black Thunder! Landlubbers have a first-mate seat to the grizzly life of eighteenth-century pirates--as told by the surprisingly poetic if salty One One-Leg Sterling. Shiver me timbers, never before have we poppets been privy to the gritty goings-on of the rum-running, treasure-thieving, marauding masters of the open sea from the inside out. . . until now! From trading rum for buxom beauties to fighting those limey British bastards, this book reveals the swaggering derring-do of these plundering and treacherous buccaneers--17 syllables at a time!



Blackbeard

Blackbeard Author Samuel Marquis
ISBN-10 1943593213
Release 2018-01-26
Pages 384
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The true story of Blackbeard-a Robin-Hood-like American patriot and the most famous pirate of all time-and the British Crown's man in Virginia, Governor Spotswood, who illegally hunted him down.



Master and Commander Vol Book 1

Master and Commander  Vol  Book 1 Author Patrick O'Brian
ISBN-10 9780393058956
Release 1990-08-17
Pages 464
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The beginning of the sweeping Aubrey-Maturin series. "The best sea story I have ever read."—Sir Francis Chichester This, the first in the splendid series of Jack Aubrey novels, establishes the friendship between Captain Aubrey, R.N., and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, against a thrilling backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. Details of a life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy are faultlessly rendered: the conversational idiom of the officers in the ward room and the men on the lower deck, the food, the floggings, the mysteries of the wind and the rigging, and the roar of broadsides as the great ships close in battle.



No Quarter

No Quarter Author Broos Campbell
ISBN-10 9781590133040
Release 2007-04-01
Pages 272
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In 1799, the US Navy faces France in an undeclared Quasi-War for the Caribbean. Matty Graves is caught up in escalating violence as he serves aboard the Rattle-Snake under his cousin, Billy. Matty already knows how to handle the sails and fight a ship. This series introduces Matty Graves, midshipman in the early years of the United States Navy.



The Far Side of the World Vol Book 10 Aubrey Maturin Novels

The Far Side of the World  Vol  Book 10   Aubrey Maturin Novels Author Patrick O'Brian
ISBN-10 9780393063820
Release 2011-12-05
Pages 368
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The inspiration for the major new motion picture starring Russell Crowe. The war of 1812 continues, and Jack Aubrey sets course for Cape Horn on a mission after his own heart: intercepting a powerful American frigate outward bound to play havoc with the British whaling trade. Stephen Maturin has fish of his own to fry in the world of secret intelligence. Disaster in various guises awaits them in the Great South Sea and in the far reaches of the Pacific: typhoons, castaways, shipwrecks, murder, and criminal insanity.



Transcendental Style in Film

Transcendental Style in Film Author Paul Schrader
ISBN-10 9780520969148
Release 2018-05-25
Pages 232
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With a new introduction, acclaimed director and screenwriter Paul Schrader revisits and updates his contemplation of slow cinema over the past fifty years. Unlike the style of psychological realism, which dominates film, the transcendental style expresses a spiritual state by means of austere camerawork, acting devoid of self-consciousness, and editing that avoids editorial comment. This seminal text analyzes the film style of three great directors—Yasujiro Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Dreyer—and posits a common dramatic language used by these artists from divergent cultures. The new edition updates Schrader’s theoretical framework and extends his theory to the works of Andrei Tarkovsky (Russia), Béla Tarr (Hungary), Theo Angelopoulos (Greece), and Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Turkey), among others. This key work by one of our most searching directors and writers is widely cited and used in film and art classes. With evocative prose and nimble associations, Schrader consistently urges readers and viewers alike to keep exploring the world of the art film.



The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry

The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry Author Ernest Fenollosa
ISBN-10 9780823228706
Release 2009-08-25
Pages 256
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First published in 1919 by Ezra Pound, Ernest Fenollosa's essay on the Chinese written language has become one of the most often quoted statements in the history of American poetics. As edited by Pound, it presents a powerful conception of language that continues to shape our poetic and stylistic preferences: the idea that poems consist primarily of images; the idea that the sentence form with active verb mirrors relations of natural force. But previous editions of the essay represent Pound's understanding-it is fair to say, his appropriation-of the text. Fenollosa's manuscripts, in the Beinecke Library of Yale University, allow us to see this essay in a different light, as a document of early, sustained cultural interchange between North Americaand East Asia.Pound's editing of the essay obscured two important features, here restored to view: Fenollosa's encounter with Tendai Buddhism and Buddhist ontology, and his concern with the dimension of sound in Chinese poetry.This book is the definitive critical edition of Fenollosa's important work. After a substantial Introduction, the text as edited by Pound is presented, together with his notes and plates. At the heart of the edition is the first full publication of the essay as Fenollosa wrote it, accompanied by the many diagrams, characters, and notes Fenollosa (and Pound) scrawled on the verso pages. Pound's deletions, insertions, and alterations to Fenollosa's sometimes ornate prose are meticulously captured, enabling readers to follow the quasi-dialogue between Fenollosa and his posthumous editor. Earlier drafts and related talks reveal the developmentof Fenollosa's ideas about culture, poetry, and translation. Copious multilingual annotation is an important feature of the edition.This masterfully edited book will be an essential resource for scholars and poets and a starting point for a renewed discussion of the multiple sources of American modernist poetry.