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Palmerston and The Times

Palmerston and The Times Author Laurence Fenton
ISBN-10 9781780760742
Release 2013-01-15
Pages 213
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Victorian Britain had two players of colossal influence on the world stage: Lord Palmerston - the dominant figure in foreign affairs in the mid-nineteenth century - and The Times - the first global newspaper, read avidly by statesmen around the world. Palmerston was also one of the first real media-manipulating politicians of the modern age, forging close links with a number of publications to create the so-called "Palmerston press." His relationship with The Times, however, was turbulent and became a prolonged and bitter rivalry. For The Times, Palmerston was no more than "a flippant dandy;" to Palmerston, The Times was a treacherous "liar." In this book, Laurence Fenton explores the highly-charged rivalry between these two titans of the mid-Victorian era, revealing the personal and political differences at the heart of an antagonism that stretched over the course of three decades.



Palmerston

Palmerston Author David Brown
ISBN-10 9780300168440
Release 2011-02-01
Pages 584
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A grand and fascinating figure in Victorian politics, the charismatic Lord Palmerston (1784-1865) served as foreign secretary for fifteen years and prime minister for nine, engaged in struggles with everyone from the Duke of Wellington to Lord John Russell to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, engineered the defeat of the Russians in the Crimean War, and played a major role in the development of liberalism and the Liberal Party. This comprehensive biography, informed by unprecedented research in the statesman's personal archives, gives full weight not only to Palmerston's foreign policy achievements, but also to his domestic political activity, political thought, life as a landlord, and private life and affairs. Through the lens of the milieu of his times, the book pinpoints for the first time the nature and extent of Palmerston's contributions to the making of modern Britain.



Reader s Guide to British History

Reader s Guide to British History Author D. M. Loades
ISBN-10 UOM:39015059137755
Release 2003-01-01
Pages 1620
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"A masterful attempt to describe the historical secondary literature of the British Isles -- from prehistory to the present day -- the set is comprised of substantial essays of 1,000 to 3,000 words each on a wide array of subjects -- all written by pre-eminent scholars in language accessible to beginning students and advanced researchers. Each listed essay title is given a thorough annotation."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.



Frederick Douglass in Ireland

Frederick Douglass in Ireland Author Laurence Fenton
ISBN-10 1444825437
Release 2015-01-09
Pages 280
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In the summer of 1845, a man named Frederick Douglass disembarked ship in Dublin. It marked the start of a two-year lecture tour of Britain and Ireland by the celebrated author, orator - and escaped slave. Advised to leave America for his own safety after the publication of his eloquent and incendiary abolitionist memoir, Douglass proceeded to spend four months in Ireland describing and denouncing the horrors of slavery: packing full halls with his oratorical skill; sharing a stage with 'The Liberator' Daniel O'Connell; and taking the pledge from 'The Apostle of Temperance' Fr. Theobald Mathew.



Victorians Against the Gallows

Victorians Against the Gallows Author James Gregory
ISBN-10 9780857730886
Release 2011-11-30
Pages 384
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By the time that Queen Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, the list of crimes liable to attract the death penalty had effectively been reduced to murder. Yet, despite this, the gallows remained a source of controversy in Victorian Britain and there was a growing unease in liberal quarters surrounding the question of capital punishment. In this book, James Gregory examines organised efforts to abolish capital punishment in Britain and the Empire in the Victorian era, focusing particularly on the activities of the Society for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. The amelioration of the notoriously ‘Bloody Code’ of the British state may have limited capital punishment effectively to a small number of murderers after 1840 but, despite this, capital punishment was a matter of perennial debate, from the local arena of school debating societies to the ‘imperial Parliament’, and a topic to trouble the minds of thoughtful Victorians across the British world. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from pamphlets by abolitionists or their opponents to gallows broadsides, official inquiries, provincial newspapers, novels and short stories, Gregory studies a movement acknowledged by contemporaries to be agitating one of the ‘questions of the day’ - challenging as it did contemporary theology, state infliction of violence, and prevalent ideas about punishment. He explores important aspects such as: capital punishment debates in the ‘Lex Britannica’ of British colonies and dominions, the role of women abolitionists and the class and gendered inflexions to the ‘gallows question’, the representation of the problem of capital punishment in Victorian fiction, and the relationship between abolitionists and the Home Office which exercised the royal prerogative of mercy. While the abolitionism of Nonconformist reformers such as the Quakers and Unitarians is familiar, Gregory introduces the reader to the abolitionist debates in Jewish, secularist and spiritualist circles, and explores themes such as the imagined role of the Queen as ‘fount of mercy’ and the disturbing figure of the hangman. Studying the provincial, national and international aspects to the movement, Victorians Against the Gallows offers an important contribution to our understanding of Victorian reform activities, and Victorian culture.



An Age of Equipoise Reassessing mid Victorian Britain

An Age of Equipoise  Reassessing mid Victorian Britain Author Martin Hewitt
ISBN-10 9781351959148
Release 2017-07-05
Pages 264
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The Age of Equipoise by W.L Burn was published in 1964 and became a central text in the canon of interpretations of the Victorian period. The book subsequently fell out of favour but recent claims to establish a new interpretative standard have, paradoxically, prompted reviewers to cast back to Burn's work as the orthodox standard against which such claims should be judged. The essays in this volume by British and American contributors all engage, to varying degrees, with the notion of 'equipoise' and how it can help to illuminate the mid-Victorian period in ways which alternative formulations cannot. Some of the chapters develop arguments embedded in Burn's own book; others take up issues largely absent in The Age of Equipoise, such as the position of children, Britain's interaction with the wider world, and the threats the period experienced to its concept of masculine identity. Together the essays demonstrate the intricacy and turbulence of the forces of cohesion in Victorian society, along with the success of that culture in achieving a working, if shifting, modus vivendi. Moreover, they substantiate the argument that, whatever the limitations of Burn's work, 'equipoise' deserves rehabilitation as a powerful conceptual framework for making sense of mid-Victorian Britain. About the Editor: Martin Hewitt is Director of the Leeds Centre for Victorian Studies and editor of the Journal of Victorian Culture. With Robert Poole he has recently produced an edition of The Diaries of Samuel Bamford, 1858-61 (Sutton, 2000).



Pax Britannica

Pax Britannica Author Muriel E. Chamberlain
ISBN-10 9781317870623
Release 2014-09-25
Pages 232
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Pax Britannica? is a study of Britain's international role and foreign policy during the century of her imperial greatness. The study shows how her foreign policy was affected, and to some extent, dictated by her domestic political issues. In her stimulating and readable study, Dr Chamberlain explains the how the whole nature of foreign-policy making changed in the nineteenth century. Once the preserve of a small handful of monarchs and professional diplomats, it was transformed by the expansion of the fanchise, the influence of the press and the mobilisation of public opinion by men such as Disraeli and Palmerston.



The Social Conscience of the Early Victorians

The Social Conscience of the Early Victorians Author F. David Roberts
ISBN-10 9780804780933
Release 2002-08-07
Pages 584
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In 1830, the dominant social outlook of the early Victorians was a paternalism that looked to property, the Church, and local Justices of the Peace to govern society and deal with its ills. By 1860, however, the dominant social outlook had become a vision of a laissez faire society that relied on economic laws, self-reliance, and the vigorous philanthropy of voluntary societies. This book describes and analyzes these changes, which arose from the rapid growth of industry, towns, population, and the middle and working classes. Paternalism did not entirely fade away, however, just as a laissez faire vision had long antedated 1830. Both were part of a social conscience also defined by a revived philanthropy, a new humanitarianism, and a grudging acceptance of an expanded government, all of which reflected a strong revival of religion as well as the growth of rationalism. The new dominance of a laissez faire vision was dramatically evident in the triumph of political economy. By 1860, only a few doubted the eternal verities of the economists’ voluminous writings. Few also doubted the verities of those who preached self-reliance, who supported the New Poor Law’s severity to persons who were not self-reliant, and who inspired education measures to promote that indispensable virtue. If economic laws and self-reliance failed to prevent distress, the philanthropists and voluntary societies would step in. Such a vision proved far more buoyant and effective than a paternalism whose narrow and rural Anglican base made it unable to cope with the downside of an industrial-urban Britain. But the vision of a laissez faire society was not without its flaws. Its harmonious economic laws and its hope in self-reliance did not prevent gross exploitation and acute distress, and however beneficent were its philanthropists, they fell far short of mitigating these evils. This vision also found a rival in an expanded government. Two powerful ideas—the idea of a paternal government and the idea of a utilitarian state—helped create the expansion of government services. A reluctant belief in governmental power thus joined the many other ideas that defined the Victorian’s social conscience.



The Young Ireland Rebellion and Limerick

The Young Ireland Rebellion and Limerick Author Laurence Fenton
ISBN-10 9781856356602
Release 2010
Pages 224
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A vivid local history recounting the excitement and tumult in Limerick during the year of the failed Young Ireland Rebellion.



Caution and cooperation

Caution and cooperation Author Martin Köhn
ISBN-10 UOM:39015076156267
Release 2008
Pages 332
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It has long been a mainstay in historical literature that the Civil War had a deleterious effect on Anglo-American relations and that Britain came close to intervention in the conflict. Historians assert that it was only a combination of desperate diplomacy, the Confederacy's military losses, and Lincoln's timely issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation that kept the British on the sidelines. Phillip E. Myers seeks to revise this prevailing view by arguing instead that wartime relations between Britain and the United States were marked by caution rather than conflict. Using a wide array of primary materials from both sides of the Atlantic, Myers traces the sources of potential Anglo-American wartime turmoil as well as the various reasons both sides had for avoiding war. And while he does note the disagreement between Washington and London, he convincingly demonstrates that transatlantic discord was ultimately minor and neither side seriously considered war against the other. Myers further extends his study into the postwar period to see how that bond strengthened and grew, culminating with the Treaty of Washington in 1871. The Civil War was not, as many have believed for so long, an unpleasant interruption in British-American affairs; instead, it was an event that helped bring the two countries closer together to seal the friendship. Soundly researched and cogently argued, Caution and Cooperation will surely prompt discussion among Civil War historians, foreign relations scholars, and readers of history.



Lectures on the Relation Between Law and Public Opinion in England During the Nineteenth Century

Lectures on the Relation Between Law and Public Opinion in England During the Nineteenth Century Author Albert Venn Dicey
ISBN-10 9781351509190
Release 2017-07-12
Pages
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The famed 1914 edition of this classic is one of the small handful of works that deserve to be read by Americans to understand the 1980s. Indeed, the final three chapters, describing the decline of will and consensus in late Victorian England, stand as a stark, unmistakable reminder that such national decline can happen again. Dicey was the most influential constitutional authority in late Victorian and Edwardian Britain. Modern politicians have often invoked the phrase "rule of law." So commonplace has it become that few recognize its source in the work of Dicey. Law and Public Opinion in England is written with simplicity, wit and a sense of purpose that marks it as a book apart. It did much more than fortell the decline of empire, it developed the forms in which such decline comes about. In many ways this book represents a pioneering statement on the libertarian tradition as a consequence of rather than rebellion against the legal norms of an advanced civilization. This is a central book for students of society and politics alike.



I Was Transformed Frederick Douglass

 I Was Transformed  Frederick Douglass Author Laurence Fenton
ISBN-10 1445670194
Release 2018-02-15
Pages 304
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A vivid and compelling account of the famous escaped slave Frederick Douglass's tour of Britain and Ireland, 1845-7



The Orient the Liberal Movement and the Eastern Crisis of 1839 41

The Orient  the Liberal Movement  and the Eastern Crisis of 1839 41 Author Pierre Caquet
ISBN-10 9783319341026
Release 2016-10-13
Pages 266
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This book focuses on the Eastern Crisis of 1839-41, closely examining the first instance of coordinated Western intervention in the Middle East during the modern era. Readers can explore topics such as how culture, domestic politics, and ideology shaped diplomacy in this landmark crisis, and the importance role played by religion - including, alongside mainstream Christianity, the Protestant Zionist movement. Highly informative and fully researched, this book suggests that the Eastern Crisis - and its associated diplomatic and military efforts - marked the first of many modern-era attempts to “improve” the region by moulding it in a Western image, providing scholars with a new perspective on this period of history.



Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge Author Martin Ingram
ISBN-10 9781107179875
Release 2017-03-23
Pages 340
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How was the law used to control sex in Tudor England? What were the differences between secular and religious practice? This major study reveals that - contrary to what historians have often supposed - in pre-Reformation England both ecclesiastical and secular (especially urban) courts were already highly active in regulating sex. They not only enforced clerical celibacy and sought to combat prostitution but also restrained the pre- and extramarital sexual activities of laypeople more generally. Initially destabilising, the religious and institutional changes of 1530-60 eventually led to important new developments that tightened the regime further. There were striking innovations in the use of shaming punishments in provincial towns and experiments in the practice of public penance in the church courts, while Bridewell transformed the situation in London. Allowing the clergy to marry was a milestone of a different sort. Together these changes contributed to a marked shift in the moral climate by 1600.



Salisbury

Salisbury Author Andrew Roberts
ISBN-10 9780571294176
Release 2012-04-19
Pages 984
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Lord Salisbury dominated the late Victorian political scene. He was Prime Minister for much of the time and also Foreign Secretary, very often holding down the two positions concurrently. In achievement and ability he was at least the equal of Disraeli and Gladstone though less well remembered. In part that was the result of his own aloof and laodicean temperament but it was also the fault of there being no faintly adequate modern biography (his daughter, Lady Gwendolen Cecil wrote a magnificent biography early in the twentieth-century but although in four volumes it only got as far as 1892). At last, in 1999 with the publication of Andrew Roberts' biography this desideratum was filled. Here was the biography of sufficient stature to do justice to the Victorian Titan. Most aptly it went on to win the Wolfson History Prize and the James Stern Silver Pen Award for Non-Fiction. The uniformly outstanding reviews prove why. 'Andrew Roberts has filled one of the great gaps in Victorian historiography. This is the first authoritative life of the statesman who dominated politics from 1885 to 1902 . . . A brilliant biography that will long replace anything which has appeared before.' Robert Blake, Daily Telegraph 'This is a biography of quite unusual quality and insight, tautly organized yet flowing easily, with years of research behind it to reinforce its authority. While not seeking to diminish either Gladstone or Disraeli, it restores Salisbury to the commanding position he rightfully occupied in Victorian politics.' Peter Clarke, Sunday Times 'An outstanding achievement . . . seldom has such an important study been such splendid entertainment.' Piers Brendon, Independent 'This is a book to put on one's shelf alongside Ehrman's Younger Pitt, Gash's volumes on Peel and Blake's Disraeli . . . Andrew Roberts' book has the balance, insight all-roundedness and intellectual elegance of Lord Salisbury himself.' A. D. Harvey, Salisbury Review '(Salisbury) deserves, and has found, a fine biographer, who has left no stone unturned in his researches, has written cogently and well about his subject, and provided not just a history of Lord Salisbury, but one of the best histories yet of Victorian Britain and her place in the world.' Simon Heffer, Daily Mail 'Salisbury is a great biography, magisterially proportioned and fit to take its place with Gash on Peel and Blake on Disraeli, if not with Morley's Gladstone. Moreover, although constructed on a massive scale, it is so beautifully written that one could not want it a page shorter. It is unlikely ever to be superseded.' Vernon Bogdanor, Times Higher Educational Supplement 'Roberts triumphantly retrieves Salisbury from unmerited obscurity with a book as delightful to read as it is informative.' Niall Ferguson, Mail on Sunday 'A terrific piece of biography; I really enjoyed it.' Jeremy Paxman, Start the Week 'Andrew Roberts' Salisbury fills a most remarkable gap in British historiography with a study that that is not only learned and comprehensive but startlingly well-written.' Michael Howard, Times Literary Supplement Books of the Year 'It captures the essence of Salisbury in a way that nothing has has ever done for me before.' Roy Jenkins, Financial Times



Imperial Twilight

Imperial Twilight Author Stephen R. Platt
ISBN-10 9780307961747
Release 2018-05-15
Pages 592
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As China reclaims its position as a world power, Imperial Twilight looks back to tell the story of the country's last age of ascendance and how it came to an end in the nineteenth-century Opium War. "This thoroughly researched and delightful work is essential for anyone interested in Chinese or British imperial history." --Library Journal (Starred Review) When Britain launched its first war on China in 1839, pushed into hostilities by profiteering drug merchants and free-trade interests, it sealed the fate of what had long been seen as the most prosperous and powerful empire in Asia, if not the world. But internal problems of corruption, popular unrest, and dwindling finances had weakened China far more than was commonly understood, and the war would help set in motion the eventual fall of the Qing dynasty--which, in turn, would lead to the rise of nationalism and communism in the twentieth century. As one of the most potent turning points in the country's modern history, the Opium War has since come to stand for everything that today's China seeks to put behind it. In this dramatic, epic story, award-winning historian Stephen Platt sheds new light on the early attempts by Western traders and missionaries to "open" China--traveling mostly in secret beyond Canton, the single port where they were allowed--even as China's imperial rulers were struggling to manage their country's decline and Confucian scholars grappled with how to use foreign trade to China's advantage. The book paints an enduring portrait of an immensely profitable--and mostly peaceful--meeting of civilizations at Canton over the long term that was destined to be shattered by one of the most shockingly unjust wars in the annals of imperial history. Brimming with a fascinating cast of British, Chinese, and American individuals, this riveting narrative of relations between China and the West has important implications for today's uncertain and ever-changing political climate.



Religion and Politics in the Risorgimento

Religion and Politics in the Risorgimento Author D. Raponi
ISBN-10 9781137342980
Release 2014-10-14
Pages 302
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This book examines Anglo-Italian political and cultural relations and analyses the importance of religion in the British 'Orientalist' perception of Italy. It puts religion at the centre of a harsh political and cultural war, one that was fought on international, diplomatic, and domestic levels.