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Peasant and Nation

Peasant and Nation Author Florencia E. Mallon
ISBN-10 0520085043
Release 1995-01
Pages 472
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"Florencia Mallon's analysis of peasant politics and state formation in Latin America compels us to rethink the relationship between the 'national' and the 'popular.' In particular, she questions the concept of 'community' in a way that scholars of subaltern histories elsewhere will find enormously helpful."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, Director of the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory, University of Melbourne, Australia "A watershed analysis--the new political history of Latin America begins here."--John Tutino, Georgetown University "Florencia Mallon's analysis of peasant politics and state formation in Latin America compels us to rethink the relationship between the 'national' and the 'popular.' In particular, she questions the concept of 'community' in a way that scholars of subaltern histories elsewhere will find enormously helpful."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, Director of the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory, University of Melbourne, Australia



A Companion to Latin American History

A Companion to Latin American History Author Thomas H. Holloway
ISBN-10 144439164X
Release 2011-03-21
Pages 544
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The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest



Beyond the Alamo

Beyond the Alamo Author Ral A. Ramos
ISBN-10 9781458722591
Release 2009-09-01
Pages 580
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This book is divided into two parts. Part 1 uses the first three chapters to examine 1821, taking stock of the multiple changes underway at independence. The chapters set up three social ''worlds'' coexisting in the region and affecting the development of the others....Part 2 follows the development of ethnicity and nationalism through Texas secession and American expansion up to the U.S. Civil War. External events coupled with internal developments strained the delicate balance Tejanos crafted after independence. The chapters in part 2 recast well-known events of that period - tensions with the Mexican government, Texas secession, the battle of the Alamo, the Republic of Texas era, and the U.S.-Mexico War - through their impact on Tejanos. The chapters present a narrative arc of Tejano decline, resurgence, and persistence in the face of changing conditions and difficult and oppressive circumstances.



Beyond the Alamo

Beyond the Alamo Author Ral A. Ramos
ISBN-10 9781458722638
Release 2009-08-31
Pages 548
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This book is divided into two parts. Part 1 uses the first three chapters to examine 1821, taking stock of the multiple changes underway at independence. The chapters set up three social worlds coexisting in the region and affecting the development of the others....Part 2 follows the development of ethnicity and nationalism through Texas secession and American expansion up to the U.S. Civil War. External events coupled with internal developments strained the delicate balance Tejanos crafted after independence. The chapters in part 2 recast well-known events of that period tensions with the Mexican government, Texas secession, the battle of the Alamo, the Republic of Texas era, and the U.S.-Mexico War through their impact on Tejanos. The chapters present a narrative arc of Tejano decline, resurgence, and persistence in the face of changing conditions and difficult and oppressive circumstances.



Myths of Demilitarization in Postrevolutionary Mexico 1920 1960

Myths of Demilitarization in Postrevolutionary Mexico  1920 1960 Author Thomas Rath
ISBN-10 9781469608358
Release 2013-04-22
Pages 256
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At the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920, Mexico's large, rebellious army dominated national politics. By the 1940s, Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) was led by a civilian president and claimed to have depoliticized the army and achieved the bloodless pacification of the Mexican countryside through land reform, schooling, and indigenismo. However, historian Thomas Rath argues, Mexico's celebrated demilitarization was more protracted, conflict-ridden, and incomplete than most accounts assume. Civilian governments deployed troops as a police force, often aimed at political suppression, while officers meddled in provincial politics, engaged in corruption, and crafted official history, all against a backdrop of sustained popular protest and debate. Using newly available materials from military, intelligence, and diplomatic archives, Rath weaves together an analysis of national and regional politics, military education, conscription, veteran policy, and popular protest. In doing so, he challenges dominant interpretations of successful, top-down demilitarization and questions the image of the post-1940 PRI regime as strong, stable, and legitimate. Rath also shows how the army's suppression of students and guerrillas in the 1960s and 1970s and the more recent militarization of policing have long roots in Mexican history.



Twilight of the Mission Frontier

Twilight of the Mission Frontier Author Jose De la Torre Curiel
ISBN-10 9780804787321
Release 2013-01-09
Pages 352
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Twilight of the Mission Frontier examines the long process of mission decline in Sonora, Mexico after the Jesuit expulsion in 1767. By reassessing the mission crisis paradigm—which speaks of a growing internal crisis leading to the secularization of the missions in the early nineteenth century—new light is shed on how demographic, cultural, economic, and institutional variables modified life in the Franciscan missions in Sonora. During the late eighteenth century, forms of interaction between Sonoran indigenous groups and Spanish settlers grew in complexity and intensity, due in part to the implementation of reform-minded Bourbon policies which envisioned a more secular, productive, and modern society. At the same time, new forms of what this book identifies as pluriethnic mobility also emerged. Franciscan missionaries and mission residents deployed diverse strategies to cope with these changes and results varied from region to region, depending on such factors as the missionaries' backgrounds, Indian responses to mission life, local economic arrangements, and cultural exchanges between Indians and Spaniards.



Sons of the Sierra

Sons of the Sierra Author Patrick J. McNamara
ISBN-10 9781469606729
Release 2012-09-01
Pages 296
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The period following Mexico's war with the United States in 1847 was characterized by violent conflicts, as liberal and conservative factions battled for control of the national government. The civil strife was particularly bloody in south central Mexico, including the southern state of Oaxaca. In Sons of the Sierra, Patrick McNamara explores events in the Oaxaca district of Ixtlan, where Zapotec Indians supported the liberal cause and sought to exercise influence over statewide and national politics. Two Mexican presidents had direct ties to Ixtlan district: Benito Juarez, who served as Mexico's liberal president from 1858 to 1872, was born in the district, and Porfirio Diaz, president from 1876 to 1911, had led a National Guard battalion made up of Zapotec soldiers throughout the years of civil war. Paying close attention to the Zapotec people as they achieved greater influence, McNamara examines the political culture of Diaz's presidency and explores how Diaz, who became increasingly dictatorial over the course of his time in office, managed to stay in power for thirty-five years. McNamara reveals the weight of memory and storytelling as Ixtlan veterans and their families reminded government officials of their ties to both Juarez and Diaz. While Juarez remained a hero in their minds, Diaz came to represent the arrogance of Mexico City and the illegitimacy of the "Porfiriato" that ended with the 1910 revolution.



Nation and Citizen in the Dominican Republic 1880 1916

Nation and Citizen in the Dominican Republic  1880 1916 Author Teresita Martínez-Vergne
ISBN-10 0807876925
Release 2006-05-18
Pages 256
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Combining intellectual and social history, Teresita Martinez-Vergne explores the processes by which people in the Dominican Republic began to hammer out a common sense of purpose and a modern national identity at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Hoping to build a nation of hardworking, peaceful, voting citizens, the Dominican intelligentsia impressed on the rest of society a discourse of modernity based on secular education, private property, modern agricultural techniques, and an open political process. Black immigrants, bourgeois women, and working-class men and women in the capital city of Santo Domingo and in the booming sugar town of San Pedro de Macoris, however, formed their own surprisingly modern notions of citizenship in daily interactions with city officials. Martinez-Vergne shows just how difficult it was to reconcile the lived realities of people of color, women, and the working poor with elite notions of citizenship, entitlement, and identity. She concludes that the urban setting, rather than defusing the impact of race, class, and gender within a collective sense of belonging, as intellectuals had envisioned, instead contributed to keeping these distinctions intact, thus limiting what could be considered Dominican.



A Nation of Villages

A Nation of Villages Author Michael Thomas Ducey
ISBN-10 0816523835
Release 2004
Pages 235
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During the period 1769-1850, republican national institutions slowly replaced colonial and monarchical rule. This was a turbulent time in rural Mexico. It was a period of political instability marked by violent peasant rebellions that were longer, more violent, and involved more people than those that occurred in the colonial era. Mexican villagers became skilled insurrectionists. In this book, Michael Ducey analyzes the peasant rebellions in MexicoÕs Huasteca region over that time, beginning with short-lived colonial riots, progressing through a long and brutal insurrection associated with the war of independence and several region-wide uprisings, and culminating in the "Caste War of the Huasteca" of the 1840s. He asks not just why villagers revolted but how their discontent fit into the political drama of early national Mexico. Ducey shows how the war offered opportunities for villagers to settle scores with members of the local elite as peasants discovered new ways of imagining the state. They were far from being the isolated traditionalists who occasionally rebelled against political or economic change described in older scholarship. At least until the 1848-1850 Caste War, political disputes were more important than land. This regionÕs peasants were both remarkably diverse and politically astute. Villagers adapted colonial political culture and later republican ideas to fashion local institutions that fit their own needs. Over the course of a hundred years, peasant tactics and political discourse evolved in a constant dialogue with the changing political climate, shifting from rhetorical statements of loyalty to the king to proclamations of federalism and their rights as citizens. A Nation of Villages ably demonstrates that rural villagers were more aware of elite ideologies than urban rulers were of the villagersÕ political ideas. This long-term analysis of one region illuminates how rural people helped shape the republican state.



A Companion to Los Angeles

A Companion to Los Angeles Author William Deverell
ISBN-10 1444390953
Release 2010-11-23
Pages 547
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This Companion contains 25 original essays by writers and scholars who present an expert assessment of the best and most important work to date on the complex history of Los Angeles. The first Companion providing a historical survey of Los Angeles, incorporating critical, multi-disciplinary themes and innovative scholarship Features essays from a range of disciplines, including history, political science, cultural studies, and geography Photo essays and ‘contemporary voice’ sections combine with traditional historiographic essays to provide a multi-dimensional view of this vibrant and diverse city Essays cover the key topics in the field within a thematic structure, including demography, social unrest, politics, popular culture, architecture, and urban studies



Peasants Politics and the Formation of Mexico s National State

Peasants  Politics  and the Formation of Mexico s National State Author Peter F. Guardino
ISBN-10 0804741905
Release 2002
Pages 319
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This is a study of the important but little-understood role of peasants in the formation of the Mexican national state--from the end of the colonial era to the beginning of La Reforma, a moment in which liberalism became dominant in Mexican political culture. The book shows how Mexico's national political system was formed through local struggles and alliances that deeply involved elements of Mexico's impoverished rural masses, notably the peasants who took part in many of the local regional, and national rebellions that characterized early nineteenth-century politics. These rebellions were not battles over whether or not there was to be a state; they were contests over what the state was to be. The author focuses on the region of Guerrero, whose peasantry were deeply involved in the two most important broadly based revolts of the early nineteenth century: the War of Independence of 1810-21, and the 1853-55 Revolution of Ayutla, the rebellion that began La Reforma. The book's central contention is that there are fundamental links between state formation, elite politics, popular protest, and the construction of Mexico's modern political culture. Various elite groups advanced different models of the state, which in turn had different implications for, and impacts on, the lives of Mexico's lower classes. Contesting elites formed alliance with segments of Mexico's peasantry as well as the urban poor and these alliances were crucial in determining national political outcomes. Thus, the participation of wide sectors of the population in politics for varying reasons--and the subsequent learning of tactics and elaborations of discourse--left an enduring mark on Mexico's political system and culture.



The Work of Recognition

The Work of Recognition Author Jason McGraw
ISBN-10 9781469617879
Release 2014-08-18
Pages 344
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This book tells the compelling story of postemancipation Colombia, from the liberation of the slaves in the 1850s through the country's first general labor strikes in the 1910s. As Jason McGraw demonstrates, ending slavery fostered a new sense of citizenship, one shaped both by a model of universal rights and by the particular freedom struggles of African-descended people. Colombia's Caribbean coast was at the center of these transformations, in which women and men of color, the region's majority population, increasingly asserted the freedom to control their working conditions, fight in civil wars, and express their religious beliefs. The history of Afro-Colombians as principal social actors after emancipation, McGraw argues, opens up a new view on the practice and meaning of citizenship. Crucial to this conception of citizenship was the right of recognition. Indeed, attempts to deny the role of people of color in the republic occurred at key turning points exactly because they demanded public recognition as citizens. In connecting Afro-Colombians to national development, The Work of Recognition also places the story within the broader contexts of Latin American popular politics, culture, and the African diaspora.



The Defense of Community in Peru s Central Highlands

The Defense of Community in Peru s Central Highlands Author Florencia E. Mallon
ISBN-10 9781400856046
Release 2014-07-14
Pages 400
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Florencia E. Mallon examines the development of capitalism in Peru's central highlands, depicting its impact on peasant village economy and society. She shows that the region's peasantry divided into an agrarian bourgeoisie and a rural proletariat during the period under discussion, although the surviving peasant ideology, village kinship networks, and the communality inspired by economic insecurity have sometimes obscured this division. Originally published in 1983. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.



Lines in the Sand

Lines in the Sand Author William E. Skuban
ISBN-10 082634223X
Release 2007
Pages 314
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Following the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile and Peru signed the Treaty of Ancón (1884) that, in part, dealt with settling a territorial dispute over the provinces of Tacna and Arica along the countries' new common border. The treaty allowed Chile to administer the two provinces for a period of ten years, after which a plebiscite would allow the region's inhabitants to determine their own nationality. At the end of the prearranged decade, however, the Chilean and the Peruvian governments had failed to conduct the vote that would determine the fate of the people. Over a quarter of a century later, and after attempts by the U.S. government to mediate the dispute, the two countries in 1929 decided simply to divide the area, with Arica becoming a part of Chile and Peru reincorporating Tacna. Against the backdrop of this contested frontier, William Skuban explores the processes of nationalism and national identity formation in the half century that followed the War of the Pacific. He first considers the national projects of Peru and Chile in the disputed territories and then moves on to how these efforts were received among the diverse social strata of the region. Skuban's study highlights the fabricated nature of national identity in what became one of the most contentious frontier situations in South American history.



The Time of Liberty

The Time of Liberty Author Peter Guardino
ISBN-10 9780822386568
Release 2005-03-16
Pages 416
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Between 1750 and 1850 Spanish American politics underwent a dramatic cultural shift as monarchist colonies gave way to independent states based at least nominally on popular sovereignty and republican citizenship. In The Time of Liberty, Peter Guardino explores the participation of subalterns in this grand transformation. He focuses on Mexico, comparing local politics in two parts of Oaxaca: the mestizo, urban Oaxaca City and the rural villages of nearby Villa Alta, where the population was mostly indigenous. Guardino challenges traditional assumptions that poverty and isolation alienated rural peasants from the political process. He shows that peasants and other subalterns were conscious and complex actors in political and ideological struggles and that popular politics played an important role in national politics in the first half of the nineteenth century. Guardino makes extensive use of archival materials, including judicial transcripts and newspaper accounts, to illuminate the dramatic contrasts between the local politics of the city and of the countryside, describing in detail how both sets of citizens spoke and acted politically. He contends that although it was the elites who initiated the national change to republicanism, the transition took root only when engaged by subalterns. He convincingly argues that various aspects of the new political paradigms found adherents among even some of the most isolated segments of society and that any subsequent failure of electoral politics was due to an absence of pluralism rather than a lack of widespread political participation.



Indians Bandits and the State

Indians  Bandits  and the State Author Pilar M. Herr
ISBN-10 IND:30000067784367
Release 2001
Pages 342
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Indians Bandits and the State has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Indians Bandits and the State also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Indians Bandits and the State book for free.



Declarations of Dependence

Declarations of Dependence Author Gregory Downs
ISBN-10 9780807877760
Release 2011-02-14
Pages 360
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In this highly original study, Gregory Downs argues that the most American of wars, the Civil War, created a seemingly un-American popular politics, rooted not in independence but in voluntary claims of dependence. Through an examination of the pleas and petitions of ordinary North Carolinians, Declarations of Dependence contends that the Civil War redirected, not destroyed, claims of dependence by exposing North Carolinians to the expansive but unsystematic power of Union and Confederate governments, and by loosening the legal ties that bound them to husbands, fathers, and masters. Faced with anarchy during the long reconstruction of government authority, people turned fervently to the government for protection and sustenance, pleading in fantastic, intimate ways for attention. This personalistic, or what Downs calls patronal, politics allowed for appeals from subordinate groups like freed blacks and poor whites, and also bound people emotionally to newly expanding postwar states. Downs's argument rewrites the history of the relationship between Americans and their governments, showing the deep roots of dependence, the complex impact of the Civil War upon popular politics, and the powerful role of Progressivism and segregation in submerging a politics of dependence that--in new form--rose again in the New Deal and persists today.