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Peasant and Nation

Peasant and Nation Author Florencia E. Mallon
ISBN-10 0520085043
Release 1995-01
Pages 472
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"Florencia Mallon's analysis of peasant politics and state formation in Latin America compels us to rethink the relationship between the 'national' and the 'popular.' In particular, she questions the concept of 'community' in a way that scholars of subaltern histories elsewhere will find enormously helpful."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, Director of the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory, University of Melbourne, Australia "A watershed analysis--the new political history of Latin America begins here."--John Tutino, Georgetown University "Florencia Mallon's analysis of peasant politics and state formation in Latin America compels us to rethink the relationship between the 'national' and the 'popular.' In particular, she questions the concept of 'community' in a way that scholars of subaltern histories elsewhere will find enormously helpful."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, Director of the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory, University of Melbourne, Australia



Trials of Nation Making

Trials of Nation Making Author Brooke Larson
ISBN-10 0521567300
Release 2004-01-19
Pages 299
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The first interpretive synthesis of the history of Andean peasants.



Trials of Nation Making

Trials of Nation Making Author Brooke Larson
ISBN-10 0521567300
Release 2004-01-19
Pages 299
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The first interpretive synthesis of the history of Andean peasants.



Lines in the Sand

Lines in the Sand Author William E. Skuban
ISBN-10 082634223X
Release 2007
Pages 314
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Following the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile and Peru signed the Treaty of Ancón (1884) that, in part, dealt with settling a territorial dispute over the provinces of Tacna and Arica along the countries' new common border. The treaty allowed Chile to administer the two provinces for a period of ten years, after which a plebiscite would allow the region's inhabitants to determine their own nationality. At the end of the prearranged decade, however, the Chilean and the Peruvian governments had failed to conduct the vote that would determine the fate of the people. Over a quarter of a century later, and after attempts by the U.S. government to mediate the dispute, the two countries in 1929 decided simply to divide the area, with Arica becoming a part of Chile and Peru reincorporating Tacna. Against the backdrop of this contested frontier, William Skuban explores the processes of nationalism and national identity formation in the half century that followed the War of the Pacific. He first considers the national projects of Peru and Chile in the disputed territories and then moves on to how these efforts were received among the diverse social strata of the region. Skuban's study highlights the fabricated nature of national identity in what became one of the most contentious frontier situations in South American history.



The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas

The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas Author Frank Salomon
ISBN-10 0521630762
Release 1999-10-28
Pages 976
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This volume, part of the *Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas*, is the first major survey of research on the indigenous peoples of South America from the earliest peopling of the continent to the present since Julian Steward's *Handbook of South American Indians* was published half a century ago. Although this volume concentrates on continental South America, peoples in the Caribbean and lower Central America who were linguistically or culturally connected are also discus sed. The volume's emphasis is on self-perceptions of the indigenous peoples of South America at various times and under differing situations.



Everyday Forms of State Formation

Everyday Forms of State Formation Author Gilbert Michael Joseph
ISBN-10 0822314673
Release 1994
Pages 432
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Everyday Forms of State Formation is the first book to systematically examine the relationship between popular cultures and state formation in revolutionary and post-revolutionary Mexico. While most accounts have emphasized either the role of peasants and peasant rebellions or that of state formation in Mexico’s past, these original essays reveal the state’s day-to-day engagement with grassroots society by examining popular cultures and forms of the state simultaneously and in relation to one another. Structured in the form of a dialogue between a distinguished array of Mexicanists and comparative social theorists, this volume boldly reassesses past analyses of the Mexican revolution and suggests new directions for future study. Showcasing a wealth of original archival and ethnographic research, this collection provides a new and deeper understanding of Mexico’s revolutionary experience. It also speaks more broadly to a problem of extraordinary contemporary relevance: the manner in which local societies and self-proclaimed "revolutionary" states are articulated historically. The result is a unique collection bridging social history, anthropology, historical sociology, and cultural studies in its formulation of new approaches for rethinking the multifaceted relationship between power, culture, and resistance. Contributors. Ana María Alonso, Armando Bartra, Marjorie Becker, Barry Carr, Philip Corrigan, Romana Falcón, Gilbert M. Joseph, Alan Knight, Florencia E. Mallon, Daniel Nugent, Elsie Rockwell, William Roseberry, Jan Rus, Derek Sayer, James C. Scott



Children of Facundo

Children of Facundo Author Ariel de la Fuente
ISBN-10 0822325969
Release 2000-11-15
Pages 249
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DIVCombines peasant studies and cultural history to revise the received wisdom on nineteenth-century Argentinian politics and aspects of the Argentinian state-formation process./div



The Defense of Community in Peru s Central Highlands

The Defense of Community in Peru s Central Highlands Author Florencia E. Mallon
ISBN-10 9781400856046
Release 2014-07-14
Pages 400
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Florencia E. Mallon examines the development of capitalism in Peru's central highlands, depicting its impact on peasant village economy and society. She shows that the region's peasantry divided into an agrarian bourgeoisie and a rural proletariat during the period under discussion, although the surviving peasant ideology, village kinship networks, and the communality inspired by economic insecurity have sometimes obscured this division. Originally published in 1983. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.



A Companion to Latin American History

A Companion to Latin American History Author Thomas H. Holloway
ISBN-10 144439164X
Release 2011-03-21
Pages 544
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The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest



Beyond the Alamo

Beyond the Alamo Author Ral A. Ramos
ISBN-10 9781458722591
Release 2009-09-01
Pages 580
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This book is divided into two parts. Part 1 uses the first three chapters to examine 1821, taking stock of the multiple changes underway at independence. The chapters set up three social ''worlds'' coexisting in the region and affecting the development of the others....Part 2 follows the development of ethnicity and nationalism through Texas secession and American expansion up to the U.S. Civil War. External events coupled with internal developments strained the delicate balance Tejanos crafted after independence. The chapters in part 2 recast well-known events of that period - tensions with the Mexican government, Texas secession, the battle of the Alamo, the Republic of Texas era, and the U.S.-Mexico War - through their impact on Tejanos. The chapters present a narrative arc of Tejano decline, resurgence, and persistence in the face of changing conditions and difficult and oppressive circumstances.



Beyond the Alamo

Beyond the Alamo Author Ral A. Ramos
ISBN-10 9781458722638
Release 2009-08-31
Pages 548
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This book is divided into two parts. Part 1 uses the first three chapters to examine 1821, taking stock of the multiple changes underway at independence. The chapters set up three social worlds coexisting in the region and affecting the development of the others....Part 2 follows the development of ethnicity and nationalism through Texas secession and American expansion up to the U.S. Civil War. External events coupled with internal developments strained the delicate balance Tejanos crafted after independence. The chapters in part 2 recast well-known events of that period tensions with the Mexican government, Texas secession, the battle of the Alamo, the Republic of Texas era, and the U.S.-Mexico War through their impact on Tejanos. The chapters present a narrative arc of Tejano decline, resurgence, and persistence in the face of changing conditions and difficult and oppressive circumstances.



Indigenous Mestizos

Indigenous Mestizos Author Marisol de la Cadena
ISBN-10 0822324202
Release 2000
Pages 408
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A study of how Cuzco’s indigenous people have transformed the terms “Indian” and “mestizo” from racial categories to social ones, thus creating a de-stigmatized version of Andean heritage.



Twilight of the Mission Frontier

Twilight of the Mission Frontier Author Jose De la Torre Curiel
ISBN-10 9780804787321
Release 2013-01-09
Pages 352
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Twilight of the Mission Frontier examines the long process of mission decline in Sonora, Mexico after the Jesuit expulsion in 1767. By reassessing the mission crisis paradigm—which speaks of a growing internal crisis leading to the secularization of the missions in the early nineteenth century—new light is shed on how demographic, cultural, economic, and institutional variables modified life in the Franciscan missions in Sonora. During the late eighteenth century, forms of interaction between Sonoran indigenous groups and Spanish settlers grew in complexity and intensity, due in part to the implementation of reform-minded Bourbon policies which envisioned a more secular, productive, and modern society. At the same time, new forms of what this book identifies as pluriethnic mobility also emerged. Franciscan missionaries and mission residents deployed diverse strategies to cope with these changes and results varied from region to region, depending on such factors as the missionaries' backgrounds, Indian responses to mission life, local economic arrangements, and cultural exchanges between Indians and Spaniards.



Sons of the Sierra

Sons of the Sierra Author Patrick J. McNamara
ISBN-10 9781469606729
Release 2012-09-01
Pages 296
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The period following Mexico's war with the United States in 1847 was characterized by violent conflicts, as liberal and conservative factions battled for control of the national government. The civil strife was particularly bloody in south central Mexico, including the southern state of Oaxaca. In Sons of the Sierra, Patrick McNamara explores events in the Oaxaca district of Ixtlan, where Zapotec Indians supported the liberal cause and sought to exercise influence over statewide and national politics. Two Mexican presidents had direct ties to Ixtlan district: Benito Juarez, who served as Mexico's liberal president from 1858 to 1872, was born in the district, and Porfirio Diaz, president from 1876 to 1911, had led a National Guard battalion made up of Zapotec soldiers throughout the years of civil war. Paying close attention to the Zapotec people as they achieved greater influence, McNamara examines the political culture of Diaz's presidency and explores how Diaz, who became increasingly dictatorial over the course of his time in office, managed to stay in power for thirty-five years. McNamara reveals the weight of memory and storytelling as Ixtlan veterans and their families reminded government officials of their ties to both Juarez and Diaz. While Juarez remained a hero in their minds, Diaz came to represent the arrogance of Mexico City and the illegitimacy of the "Porfiriato" that ended with the 1910 revolution.



Myths of Demilitarization in Postrevolutionary Mexico 1920 1960

Myths of Demilitarization in Postrevolutionary Mexico  1920 1960 Author Thomas Rath
ISBN-10 9781469608358
Release 2013-04-22
Pages 256
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At the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920, Mexico's large, rebellious army dominated national politics. By the 1940s, Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) was led by a civilian president and claimed to have depoliticized the army and achieved the bloodless pacification of the Mexican countryside through land reform, schooling, and indigenismo. However, historian Thomas Rath argues, Mexico's celebrated demilitarization was more protracted, conflict-ridden, and incomplete than most accounts assume. Civilian governments deployed troops as a police force, often aimed at political suppression, while officers meddled in provincial politics, engaged in corruption, and crafted official history, all against a backdrop of sustained popular protest and debate. Using newly available materials from military, intelligence, and diplomatic archives, Rath weaves together an analysis of national and regional politics, military education, conscription, veteran policy, and popular protest. In doing so, he challenges dominant interpretations of successful, top-down demilitarization and questions the image of the post-1940 PRI regime as strong, stable, and legitimate. Rath also shows how the army's suppression of students and guerrillas in the 1960s and 1970s and the more recent militarization of policing have long roots in Mexican history.



Nation and Citizen in the Dominican Republic 1880 1916

Nation and Citizen in the Dominican Republic  1880 1916 Author Teresita Martínez-Vergne
ISBN-10 0807876925
Release 2006-05-18
Pages 256
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Combining intellectual and social history, Teresita Martinez-Vergne explores the processes by which people in the Dominican Republic began to hammer out a common sense of purpose and a modern national identity at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Hoping to build a nation of hardworking, peaceful, voting citizens, the Dominican intelligentsia impressed on the rest of society a discourse of modernity based on secular education, private property, modern agricultural techniques, and an open political process. Black immigrants, bourgeois women, and working-class men and women in the capital city of Santo Domingo and in the booming sugar town of San Pedro de Macoris, however, formed their own surprisingly modern notions of citizenship in daily interactions with city officials. Martinez-Vergne shows just how difficult it was to reconcile the lived realities of people of color, women, and the working poor with elite notions of citizenship, entitlement, and identity. She concludes that the urban setting, rather than defusing the impact of race, class, and gender within a collective sense of belonging, as intellectuals had envisioned, instead contributed to keeping these distinctions intact, thus limiting what could be considered Dominican.



Blood and Fire

Blood and Fire Author Mary Roldán
ISBN-10 0822329182
Release 2002-06-11
Pages 392
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Between 1946 and 1958 there was a surge of violence in Colombia that left 200,000 dead in one of the worst conflicts our hemisphere has ever experienced. This little-studied period of terror, known as La Violencia, is the subject of Blood and Fire. Scholars have traditionally assumed that partisan politics provided the underpinning for La Violencia, but Mary Roldn challenges earlier assessments of the motives behind the brutality by providing a nuanced account of the political and cultural context of the events. Through an analysis of the evolution of violence in Antioquia, a region of Colombia, Roldn demonstrates how tensions between regional politics and the weak central state, the privatisation of state violence into paramilitary units, and prejudices about race, geography, class, and ethnicity all ultimately fed into surges of violent activity. Although the author acknowledges that partisan animosities played a key role in the disintegration of peaceful discourse, she argues that these politics were intensified by other concerns. Roldan's reading of the historical events suggests that Antioquia's experience of La Violencia was the culmination of a brand of internal colonialism, whereby regional identity formation was based on assumptions of cultural superiority and used as an opportunity to justify violence against racial or ethnic "others" and a chance to seize their resources. This is the first study to analyse intersections of ethnicity, geography, and class to explore the genesis of Colombian violence, and it has implications for the study of repression in many other nations.