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Professing Literature

Professing Literature Author Gerald Graff
ISBN-10 0226305252
Release 2008-11-15
Pages 340
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Widely considered the standard history of the profession of literary studies, Professing Literature unearths the long-forgotten ideas and debates that created the literature department as we know it today. In a readable and often-amusing narrative, Gerald Graff shows that the heated conflicts of our recent culture wars echo—and often recycle—controversies over how literature should be taught that began more than a century ago. Updated with a new preface by the author that addresses many of the provocative arguments raised by its initial publication, Professing Literature remains an essential history of literary pedagogy and a critical classic. “Graff’s history. . . is a pathbreaking investigation showing how our institutions shape literary thought and proposing how they might be changed.”— The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism



Professing Literature

Professing Literature Author Gerald Graff
ISBN-10 0226306046
Release 1989-02-15
Pages 315
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A paper reprint of the 1987 original in which Graff (humanities and Egnlish, Northwestern University) traces the history of the rise and development of academic literary studies in teh US. A detailed account of the forgotten and infamous figures and the frustrations and accomplishments that have shaped American English departments, the book is also a study in literary theory. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR



Cultural Capital

Cultural Capital Author John Guillory
ISBN-10 9780226310015
Release 2013-09-15
Pages 408
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John Guillory challenges the most fundamental premises of the canon debate by resituating the problem of canon formation in an entirely new theoretical framework. The result is a book that promises to recast not only the debate about the literary curriculum but also the controversy over "multiculturalism" and the current "crisis of the humanities." Employing concepts drawn from Pierre Bourdieu's sociology, Guillory argues that canon formation must be understood less as a question of the representation of social groups than as a question of the distribution of "cultural capital" in the schools, which regulate access to literacy, to the practices of reading and writing.



Literary Research Guide

Literary Research Guide Author James L. Harner
ISBN-10 0873529839
Release 2002-01-01
Pages 802
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The fourth edition of Literary Research Guide adds entries describing resources published since 1997, many of which reflect the expansion of literary study into emerging fields (gay, lesbian, and transgendered studies and postcolonial theory). It also lists reliable Web sites sponsored by academic institutions and learned societies. The Guide concludes with name, title, and subject indexes.



The Origins of American Literature Studies

The Origins of American Literature Studies Author Elizabeth Renker
ISBN-10 9781139469043
Release 2007-10-18
Pages
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Although American literature is a standard subject in the American college curriculum, a century ago few people thought it should be taught there. Elizabeth Renker uncovers the complex historical process through which American literature overcame its image of aesthetic and historical inferiority to become an important field for academic study and research. Renker's extensive original archival research focuses on four institutions of higher education serving distinct regional, class, race and gender populations. She argues that American literature's inferior image arose from its affiliation with non-elite schools, teachers and students, and that it had to overcome this social identity in order to achieve status as serious knowledge. Renker's revisionary analysis is an important contribution to the intellectual history of the United States and will be of interest to anyone studying, teaching or researching American literature.



The Alter Ego Perspectives of Literary Historiography

The Alter Ego Perspectives of Literary Historiography Author Min Wang
ISBN-10 9783642353895
Release 2013-07-05
Pages 184
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This book mainly discusses about the alter ego perspectives in literary historiography. This comparative analysis of the major Chinese literary histories in China and in the West brings to light the alter ego perspectives of Stephen Owen in literary historiography. The most interesting part of the book will be the interpretation of new notions and perspectives proposed by Stephen Owen, especially in the newly published The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature (2010). This book gives a detailed overview about the different stages of writing Chinese literary history and the different modes of literary historiography in China and in the West. Two case studies of Chinese poems are made on the notion of discursive communities and the Cultural Tang. Readers will a better understanding about the paradigm of literary historiography and the interrelationships between the different modes of literary historiography and the intellectual history. ​



Clueless in Academe

Clueless in Academe Author Gerald Graff
ISBN-10 0300105142
Release 2004-07
Pages 309
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Gerald Graff argues that our schools and colleges make the intellectual life seem more opaque, narrowly specialized, and beyond normal learning capacities than it is or needs to be. Left clueless in the academic world, many students view the life of the mind as a secret society for which only an elite few qualify. In a refreshing departure from standard diatribes against academia, Graff shows how academic unintelligibility is unwittingly reinforced not only by academic jargon and obscure writing, but by the disconnection of the curriculum and the failure to exploit the many connections between academia and popular culture. Finally, Graff offers a wealth of practical suggestions for making the culture of ideas and arguments more accessible to students, showing how students can enter the public debates that permeate their lives.



New Directions in the History of the Novel

New Directions in the History of the Novel Author P. Parrinder
ISBN-10 9781137026989
Release 2014-02-25
Pages 244
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New Directions in the History of the Novel challenges received views of literary history and sets out new areas for research. A re-examination of the nature of prose fiction in English and its study from the Renaissance to the 21st century, it will become required reading for teachers and students of the novel and its history.



Teaching Literature at a Distance

Teaching Literature at a Distance Author Takis Kayalis
ISBN-10 9781441114365
Release 2010-03-04
Pages 220
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Featuring essays by an international array of literature scholars, this volume examines the challenges and opportunities of teaching literature at Open and Virtual Universities in a wide range of national, cultural and linguistic contexts. It presents cutting-edge explorations of seminal issues, including: literature pedagogy and curriculum building; canon and theory debates; the uses of hypertext and other digital tools for literary instruction; the writing and evaluation of educational material; and the teaching of digital literature. These issues are addressed from various critical and theoretical viewpoints, which reflect the contributors' long educational and administrative involvement with open and distance learning (ODL) in a rich diversity of cultural and academic frameworks. As the first scholarly attempt to bring together questions of literature pedagogy and issues in open and distance, online and blended learning, this book is an essential resource for literature instructors and administrators in ODL, e-learning and b-learning programs. It offers techniques enabling scholars in more traditional academic settings to make literature courses more effective and stimulating by using tools developed for distance learning.



The Unrepentant Renaissance

The Unrepentant Renaissance Author Richard Strier
ISBN-10 9780226777535
Release 2011-09-01
Pages 328
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Who during the Renaissance could have dissented from the values of reason and restraint, patience and humility, rejection of the worldly and the physical? These widely articulated values were part of the inherited Christian tradition and were reinforced by key elements in the Renaissance, especially the revival of Stoicism and Platonism. This book is devoted to those who did dissent from them. Richard Strier reveals that many long-recognized major texts did question the most traditional values and uncovers a Renaissance far more bumptious and affirmative than much recent scholarship has allowed. The Unrepentant Renaissance counters the prevalent view of the period as dominated by the regulation of bodies and passions, aiming to reclaim the Renaissance as an era happily churning with surprising, worldly, and self-assertive energies. Reviving the perspective of Jacob Burckhardt and Nietzsche, Strier provides fresh and uninhibited readings of texts by Petrarch, More, Shakespeare, Ignatius Loyola, Montaigne, Descartes, and Milton. Strier’s lively argument will stir debate throughout the field of Renaissance studies.



Literature Against Itself

Literature Against Itself Author Gerald Graff
ISBN-10 1566630975
Release 1995-01-01
Pages 260
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The first and still one of the best critiques of post-1960s cultural radicalism, analyzing why and how the defenders of literature have gone wrong. A wonderfully trenchant and illuminating inquiry. Virginia Quarterly Review."



Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria Author Beverly Daniel Tatum
ISBN-10 9781541616585
Release 2017-09-05
Pages 464
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The classic, bestselling book on the psychology of racism--now fully revised and updated Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America. "An unusually sensitive work about the racial barriers that still divide us in so many areas of life."-Jonathan Kozol



Paper Cadavers

Paper Cadavers Author Kirsten Weld
ISBN-10 9780822376583
Release 2014-02-26
Pages 352
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In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production. After Guatemala's bloody thirty-six years of civil war (1960–1996), silence and impunity reigned. That is, until 2005, when human rights investigators stumbled on the archives of the country's National Police, which, at 75 million pages, proved to be the largest trove of secret state records ever found in Latin America. The unearthing of the archives renewed fierce debates about history, memory, and justice. In Paper Cadavers, Weld explores Guatemala's struggles to manage this avalanche of evidence of past war crimes, providing a firsthand look at how postwar justice activists worked to reconfigure terror archives into implements of social change. Tracing the history of the police files as they were transformed from weapons of counterinsurgency into tools for post-conflict reckoning, Weld sheds light on the country's fraught transition from war to an uneasy peace, reflecting on how societies forget and remember political violence.



Slavery And Public History

Slavery And Public History Author James Oliver Horton
ISBN-10 9781595587442
Release 2011-05-10
Pages 272
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America's slave past is being analyzed as never before, yet it remains one of the most contentious issues in U.S. memory. In recent years, the culture wars over the way that slavery is remembered and taught have reached a new crescendo. From the argument about the display of the Confederate flag over the state house in Columbia, South Carolina, to the dispute over Thomas Jefferson's relationship with his slave Sally Hemings and the ongoing debates about reparations, the questions grow ever more urgent and more difficult. Edited by noted historians James Oliver Horton and Lois E. Horton, this collection explores current controversies and offers a bracing analysis of how people remember their past and how the lessons they draw influence American politics and culture today. Bringing together some of the nation's most respected historians, including Ira Berlin, David W. Blight, and Gary B. Nash, this is a major contribution to the unsettling but crucial debate about the significance of slavery and its meaning for racial reconciliation.



Teaching Narrative Theory

Teaching Narrative Theory Author David Herman
ISBN-10 160329080X
Release 2010-01-01
Pages 326
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The last two decades have seen a burst of renewed interest in narrative theory across many academic disciplines as scholars analyze the power of storytelling in print and other media. Teaching Narrative Theory provides a comprehensive resource for instructors who aim to help students identify and understand the distinctive features of narrativity in a text or discourse and make use of the terms and concepts of the field. This volume in the Options for Teaching series is organized to assist teachers at different levels of instruction and in different disciplinary settings. In twenty-one essays, the contributors discuss narrative theory's various teaching contexts (e.g., classes on literature, creative writing, and folklore and ethnography); key concepts and terms (e.g., story and plot, time and space, voice, perspective); applications beyond printed texts (e.g., film and digital media); and impact on other areas of theory (e.g., gender and ethnic studies). A glossary provides a guide to the challenging technical terminology characteristic of the field, and the volume as a whole emphasizes the importance of understanding and implementing technical terms in learning narrative theory.



Sweet Science

Sweet Science Author Amanda Jo Goldstein
ISBN-10 9780226458588
Release 2017-07-10
Pages 336
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Today we do not expect poems to carry scientifically valid information. But it was not always so. In Sweet Science, Amanda Jo Goldstein returns to the beginnings of the division of labor between literature and science to recover a tradition of Romantic life writing for which poetry was a privileged technique of empirical inquiry. Goldstein puts apparently literary projects, such as William Blake’s poetry of embryogenesis, Goethe’s journals On Morphology, and Percy Shelley’s “poetry of life,” back into conversation with the openly poetic life sciences of Erasmus Darwin, J. G. Herder, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. Such poetic sciences, Goldstein argues, share in reviving Lucretius’s De rerum natura to advance a view of biological life as neither self-organized nor autonomous, but rather dependent on the collaborative and symbolic processes that give it viable and recognizable form. They summon De rerum natura for a logic of life resistant to the vitalist stress on self-authorizing power and to make a monumental case for poetry’s role in the perception and communication of empirical realities. The first dedicated study of this mortal and materialist dimension of Romantic biopoetics, Sweet Science opens a through-line between Enlightenment materialisms of nature and Marx’s coming historical materialism.



The Danger of Romance

The Danger of Romance Author Karen Sullivan
ISBN-10 9780226540436
Release 2018-03-07
Pages 336
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The curious paradox of romance is that, throughout its history, this genre has been dismissed as trivial and unintellectual, yet people have never ceased to flock to it with enthusiasm and even fervor. In contemporary contexts, we devour popular romance and fantasy novels like The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones, reference them in conversations, and create online communities to expound, passionately and intelligently, upon their characters and worlds. But romance is “unrealistic,” critics say, doing readers a disservice by not accurately representing human experiences. It is considered by some to be a distraction from real literature, a distraction from real life, and little more. Yet is it possible that romance is expressing a truth—and a truth unrecognized by realist genres? The Arthurian literature of the Middle Ages, Karen Sullivan argues, consistently ventriloquizes in its pages the criticisms that were being made of romance at the time, and implicitly defends itself against those criticisms. The Danger of Romance shows that the conviction that ordinary reality is the only reality is itself an assumption, and one that can blind those who hold it to the extraordinary phenomena that exist around them. It demonstrates that that which is rare, ephemeral, and inexplicable is no less real than that which is commonplace, long-lasting, and easily accounted for. If romance continues to appeal to audiences today, whether in its Arthurian prototype or in its more recent incarnations, it is because it confirms the perception—or even the hope—of a beauty and truth in the world that realist genres deny.