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Public Opinion and the Rehnquist Court

Public Opinion and the Rehnquist Court Author Thomas R. Marshall
ISBN-10 0791473481
Release 2009-01-01
Pages 269
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Public Opinion and the Rehnquist Court offers the most thorough evidence yet in favor of the U.S. Supreme Court representing public opinion. Thomas R. Marshall analyzes more than two thousand nationwide public opinion polls during the Rehnquist Court era and argues that a clear majority of Supreme Court decisions agree with public opinion. He explains that the Court represents American attitudes when public opinion is well informed on a dispute and when the U.S. Solicitor General takes a position agreeing with poll majorities. He also finds that certain justices best represent public opinion and that the Court uses its review powers over the state and federal courts to bring judicial decision making back in line with public opinion. Finally, Marshall observes that unpopular Supreme Court decisions simply do not endure as long as do popular decisions. Book jacket.



The Will of the People

The Will of the People Author Barry Friedman
ISBN-10 1429989955
Release 2009-09-29
Pages 624
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In recent years, the justices of the Supreme Court have ruled definitively on such issues as abortion, school prayer, and military tribunals in the war on terror. They decided one of American history's most contested presidential elections. Yet for all their power, the justices never face election and hold their offices for life. This combination of influence and apparent unaccountability has led many to complain that there is something illegitimate—even undemocratic—about judicial authority. In The Will of the People, Barry Friedman challenges that claim by showing that the Court has always been subject to a higher power: the American public. Judicial positions have been abolished, the justices' jurisdiction has been stripped, the Court has been packed, and unpopular decisions have been defied. For at least the past sixty years, the justices have made sure that their decisions do not stray too far from public opinion. Friedman's pathbreaking account of the relationship between popular opinion and the Supreme Court—from the Declaration of Independence to the end of the Rehnquist court in 2005—details how the American people came to accept their most controversial institution and shaped the meaning of the Constitution.



The Rehnquist Court and Criminal Punishment

The Rehnquist Court and Criminal Punishment Author Christopher E. Smith
ISBN-10 9781135637705
Release 2014-02-04
Pages 172
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First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.



The Unpublished Opinions of the Rehnquist Court

The Unpublished Opinions of the Rehnquist Court Author the late Bernard Schwartz
ISBN-10 9780195357622
Release 1996-01-04
Pages 512
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In the last twenty years, the veil of secrecy surrounding the workings of the United States Supreme Court has been lifted. Justice Thurgood Marshall's controversial decision to make his papers available to the public ushered in a new era of openness about the operation of the Court--but not without criticism from Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. The Unpublished Opinions of the Rehnquist Court provides a behind-the- scenes look at the Supreme Court, showing how changes between the drafts and the Justices' final opinions have created substantial differences in the outcome of the Court's decisions. As with his two previous works The Unpublished Opinions of the Warren Court and the Unpublished Opinions of the Burger Court, author Bernard Schwartz uses private court papers to follow these decisions and explore the key role and responsibility of the Chief Justice. Among the ten cases examined by Schwartz are key abortion cases Hodgson v. Minnesota and Webster v. Reproductive Health Services-- the original draft of which would have virtually overruled Roe v. Wade--as well as a civil rights case, Patterson v. McLean Credit Union. Schwartz considers the draft opinions and explains why the drafts were not issued as the final opinions and dissents in these cases. In particular, he shows what would have happened if the draft opinions had come down as the final opinions. The Unpublished Opinions of the Rehnquist Court serves to clarify and explore the actual operation of the judicial decision-making process. It will be fascinating and informative reading for attorneys, judges, law students, politicians and anyone interested in the mechanics of the nation's highest Court.



The Partisan

The Partisan Author John A. Jenkins
ISBN-10 9781586488871
Release 2012
Pages 330
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Follows Rehnquist's career as a young lawyer in Arizona through his journey to Washington though the Warren and Burger courts to his twenty-year tenure as a Supreme Court Chief Justice who favored government power over individual rights.



The Rehnquist Court and Criminal Justice

The Rehnquist Court and Criminal Justice Author Christopher E. Smith
ISBN-10 9780739140826
Release 2011-11-16
Pages 334
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By analyzing the perspectives and influential decisions of individual justices on the Rehnquist Court (1986-2005), this volume reveals how a divided Supreme Court limited the scope of rights affecting criminal justice without fulfilling conservatives' goal of eliminating foundational concepts established during the Warren Court era. The era's generally conservative Supreme Court preserved rights in several contexts because individual justices do not necessarily view all constitutional rights issues through a simple, consistent philosophical lens.



The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right

The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right Author Michael J. Graetz
ISBN-10 9781476732503
Release 2016-06-07
Pages 480
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"Drawing on the personal papers of justices as well as other archives, a first-of-its-kind book provides a fresh perspective at the Warren Burger Supreme Court, digging down to the roots of its most significant decisions and shows how their legacy affects us today,"--NoveList.



The U S Supreme Court and New Federalism

The U S  Supreme Court and New Federalism Author Christopher P. Banks
ISBN-10 9781442218581
Release 2012-07-13
Pages 362
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Constitutional scholars Christopher P. Banks and John C. Blakeman offer the most current and the first book-length study of the U.S. Supreme Court’s “new federalism” begun by the Rehnquist Court and now flourishing under Chief Justice John Roberts. While the Rehnquist Court reinvorgorated new federalism by protecting state sovereignty and set new constitutional limits on federal power, Banks and Blakeman show that in the Roberts Court new federalism continues to evolve in a docket increasingly attentive to statutory construction, preemption, and business litigation



The Rehnquist Court

The Rehnquist Court Author Thomas R. Hensley
ISBN-10 9781576072004
Release 2006
Pages 443
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Highlights: - Provides an analysis of the major conservative changes in U.S. constitutional law during the Rehnquist Court- Analyzes the Rehnquist Court's voting record and the lasting impacts of those votes



Like a Loaded Weapon

Like a Loaded Weapon Author Robert A. Williams
ISBN-10 9781452907567
Release 2005
Pages 270
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Robert A. Williams Jr. boldly exposes the ongoing legal force of the racist language directed at Indians in American society. Fueled by well-known negative racial stereotypes of Indian savagery and cultural inferiority, this language, Williams contends, has functioned “like a loaded weapon” in the Supreme Court’s Indian law decisions. Beginning with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinions in the early nineteenth century and continuing today in the judgments of the Rehnquist Court, Williams shows how undeniably racist language and precedent are still used in Indian law to justify the denial of important rights of property, self-government, and cultural survival to Indians. Building on the insights of Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Frantz Fanon, Williams argues that racist language has been employed by the courts to legalize a uniquely American form of racial dictatorship over Indian tribes by the U.S. government. Williams concludes with a revolutionary proposal for reimagining the rights of American Indians in international law, as well as strategies for compelling the current Supreme Court to confront the racist origins of Indian law and for challenging bigoted ways of talking, thinking, and writing about American Indians. Robert A. Williams Jr. is professor of law and American Indian studies at the James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona. A member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe, he is author of The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest and coauthor of Federal Indian Law.



Readings in American government and politics

Readings in American government and politics Author Randall B. Ripley
ISBN-10 0534161707
Release 1993
Pages 448
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Readings in American government and politics has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Readings in American government and politics also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Readings in American government and politics book for free.



Supreme Court

Supreme Court Author
ISBN-10 LLMC:NYAOUUO1KE0G
Release
Pages
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Supreme Court has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Supreme Court also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Supreme Court book for free.



Congress Confronts the Court

Congress Confronts the Court Author Colton C. Campbell
ISBN-10 9780585389028
Release 2002-05-09
Pages 160
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The Supreme Court is frequently portrayed as an isolated entity void of politics that reaches judgments by some unseen and unknowable logic. At the same time, Congress is cast as a singularly political enterprise with little regard for nuanced lawmaking. This volume of original essays by leading scholars shows both branches in a new light. It explores the impact of sustained partisan politics, the recent reassertion of legislative power at the expense of judicial review, and the sometimes stormy relationship between Congress and the Court.



Encyclopedia of American Civil Rights and Liberties H R

Encyclopedia of American Civil Rights and Liberties  H R Author Otis H. Stephens
ISBN-10 0313327602
Release 2006
Pages 1342
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Contains entries that discuss aspects of civil rights and liberties, covering major historical developments and social movements, key legislation, Supreme Court decisions, influential individuals, Constitutional provisions, and groups and organizations; arranged alphabetically from H to R.



Public Opinion and the Supreme Court

Public Opinion and the Supreme Court Author Thomas R. Marshall
ISBN-10 0044970471
Release 1989-01-01
Pages 214
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Very Good,No Highlights or Markup,all pages are intact.



A Mere Machine

A Mere Machine Author Anna Harvey
ISBN-10 9780300199192
Release 2013-11-28
Pages 384
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Introductory textbooks on American government tell us that the Supreme Court is independent from the elected branches and that independent courts better protect rights than their more deferential counterparts. But are these facts or myths? In this groundbreaking new work, Anna Harvey reports evidence showing that the Supreme Court is in fact extraordinarily deferential to congressional preferences in its constitutional rulings. Analyzing cross-national evidence, Harvey also finds that the rights protections we enjoy in the United States appear to be largely due to the fact that we do not have an independent Supreme Court. In fact, we would likely have even greater protections for political and economic rights were we to prohibit our federal courts from exercising judicial review altogether. Harvey’s findings suggest that constitutional designers would be wise to heed Thomas Jefferson’s advice to “let mercy be the character of the law-giver, but let the judge be a mere machine.&rdquo



Unwarranted

Unwarranted Author Barry Friedman
ISBN-10 9780374710903
Release 2017-02-21
Pages 448
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“At a time when policing in America is at a crossroads, Barry Friedman provides much-needed insight, analysis, and direction in his thoughtful new book. Unwarranted illuminates many of the often ignored issues surrounding how we police in America and highlights why reform is so urgently needed. This revealing book comes at a critically important time and has much to offer all who care about fair treatment and public safety.” —Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative and author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption In June 2013, documents leaked by Edward Snowden sparked widespread debate about secret government surveillance of Americans. Just over a year later, the shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, set off protests and triggered concern about militarization of law enforcement and discriminatory policing. In Unwarranted, Barry Friedman argues that these two seemingly disparate events are connected—and that the problem is not so much the policing agencies as it is the rest of us. We allow these agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, rather than calling the shots ourselves. And the courts, which we depended upon to supervise policing, have let us down entirely. Unwarranted tells the stories of ordinary people whose lives were torn apart by policing—by the methods of cops on the beat and those of the FBI and NSA. Driven by technology, policing has changed dramatically. Once, cops sought out bad guys; today, increasingly militarized forces conduct wide surveillance of all of us. Friedman captures the eerie new environment in which CCTV, location tracking, and predictive policing have made suspects of us all, while proliferating SWAT teams and increased use of force have put everyone’s property and lives at risk. Policing falls particularly heavily on minority communities and the poor, but as Unwarranted makes clear, the effects of policing are much broader still. Policing is everyone’s problem. Police play an indispensable role in our society. But our failure to supervise them has left us all in peril. Unwarranted is a critical, timely intervention into debates about policing, a call to take responsibility for governing those who govern us.