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Quicksand

Quicksand Author Nella Larsen
ISBN-10 9780486451404
Release 2006-09-15
Pages 125
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Hypocrisy and prejudice compel a principled racially mixed teacher to desert a steady job and a socially prominent fiancâe.



We Need to Talk About Kevin

We Need to Talk About Kevin Author Lionel Shriver
ISBN-10 1582438870
Release 2011-05-01
Pages 416
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That neither nature nor nurture bears exclusive responsibility for a child's character is self-evident. But generalizations about genes are likely to provide cold comfort if it's your own child who just opened fire on his feellow algebra students and whose class photograph—with its unseemly grin—is shown on the evening news coast-to-coast. If the question of who's to blame for teenage atrocity intrigues news-watching voyeurs, it tortures our narrator, Eva Khatchadourian. Two years before the opening of the novel, her son, Kevin, murdered seven of his fellow high school students, a cafeteria worker, and the much-beloved teacher who had tried to befriend him. Because his sixteenth birthday arrived two days after the killings, he received a lenient sentence and is currently in a prison for young offenders in upstate New York. In relating the story of Kevin's upbringing, Eva addresses her estranged husband, Frank, through a series of startingly direct letters. Fearing that her own shortcomings may have shaped what her son became, she confesses to a deep, long-standing ambivalence about both motherhood in general—and Kevin in particular. How much is her fault? We Need To Talk About Kevin offers no at explanations for why so many white, well-to-do adolescents—whether in Pearl, Paducah, Springfield, or Littleton—have gone nihilistically off the rails while growing up in the most prosperous country in history. Instead, Lionel Shriver tells a compelling, absorbing, and resonant story with an explosive, haunting ending. She considers motherhood, marriage, family, career—while framing these horrifying tableaus of teenage carnage as metaphors for the larger tragedy of a country where everything works, nobody starves, and anything can be bought but a sense of purpose.



Who was that Man

Who was that Man Author Neil Bartlett
ISBN-10 9781852421236
Release 1988
Pages 254
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Sitting up reading late at night, the author reflects on the links between the homosexual of the 1980s and his counterparts of a century ago, between gay lives today and those of Oscar Wilde, his friends, lovers and acquaintances. Many books have been written about Oscar Wilde. Who Was That Man? is unique - the acting out of a love-hate relationship between Wilde and a gay Londoner of today. Neil Bartlett has grabbed history by the collar and made bitter love to it. I can think of no other way to describe this fantastic personal meditation on Oscar Wilde and the last hundred years of English homosexuality. At the very moment gay existence is endangered by disease and a renewed puritanism, Bartlett has embraced what was alien and criminal or merely clinical and loved it into poignant life - Edmund White



Quicksand

Quicksand Author Steve Toltz
ISBN-10 9781476797847
Release 2015-09-15
Pages 368
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This fearlessly funny, outrageously inventive dark comedy about two lifelong friends is “a delightful literary novel…extraordinarily imaginative” (Psychology Today) from Man Booker Prize finalist Steve Toltz—for fans of Dave Eggers, Martin Amis, and David Foster Wallace. Liam is a struggling writer and a failing cop. Aldo, his best friend and muse, is a haplessly criminal entrepreneur with an uncanny knack for disaster. As Aldo’s luck worsens, Liam is inspired to base his next book on his best friend’s exponential misfortunes and hopeless quest to win back his one great love: his ex-wife, Stella. What begins as an attempt to make sense of Aldo’s mishaps spirals into a profound story of faith and friendship. “Steve Toltz channels a poet’s delight in crafting the perfect phrase on every highly quotable page” (Publishers Weekly). With the same originality, brilliance, and buoyancy that catapulted his first novel, A Fraction of the Whole, onto prize lists around the world, Toltz has created a rousing, hysterically funny but unapologetically dark satire about love, faith, friendship, and the artist’s obligation to his muse. Quicksand is a subversive portrait of twenty-first-century society in all its hypocrisy and absurdity that “confounds and astonishes in equal measure, often on the same page…A tour de force” (Australian Book Review).



Literary Essays of Ezra Pound

Literary Essays of Ezra Pound Author Ezra Pound
ISBN-10 0811201570
Release 1968
Pages 464
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The contemporary significance and permanent value of Pound's criticism are revealed in these collected essays and reviews



Two Serious Ladies

Two Serious Ladies Author Jane Bowles
ISBN-10 0062283138
Release 2014-02-25
Pages 100
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Two Serious Ladies by Jane Bowles has descriptive copy which is not yet available from the Publisher.



The Complete Fiction of Nella Larsen

The Complete Fiction of Nella Larsen Author Nella Larsen
ISBN-10 9780307757166
Release 2010-09-01
Pages 304
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This volume brings together the complete fiction of the author of Passing and Quicksand, one of the most gifted writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Throughout her short but brilliant literary career, Nella Larsen wrote piercing dramas about the black middle class that featured sensitive, spirited heroines struggling to find a place where they belonged. Passing, Larsen’s best-known work, is a disturbing story about the unraveling lives of two childhood friends, one of whom turns her back on her past and marries a white bigot. Just as disquieting is the portrait in Quicksand of Helga Crane, half black and half white, who is unable to escape her loneliness no matter where and with whom she lives. Race and marriage offer few securities here or in the other stories in this compulsively readable collection, rich in psychological complexity and imbued with a sense of place that brings Harlem vibrantly to life.



Village Prodigies

Village Prodigies Author Rodney Jones
ISBN-10 9780544960138
Release 2017-03-21
Pages 144
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“A novel in language as dense and lush and beautiful as poetry . . . [or] a book of poetry with the vivid characters and the narrative force of a novel? Whatever you care to call it, it’s a remarkable achievement.” — Richard Russo, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Empire Falls Village Prodigies imagines the town of Cold Springs, Alabama, from 1950 to 2015 and unfurls its narrative reach as six boys—prodigies and swains—grow up and leave the familiarity of home and the rural South. Yet all prodigies, all memories, all stories inevitably loop back. Through a multiplicity of points of view and innovative forms, Rodney Jones plays with the contradictions in our experience of time, creating portals through which we travel between moments and characters, from the interior mind to the most exterior speech, from delusions to rational thought. We experience Alzheimer’s and its effect on family, listen to family lore and read family Facebook posts, relive war, and revive half-forgotten folktales and video games. In this deep examination of personal and communal memory, Jones blurs the lines between analog and digital, poetry and prose.



Passing

Passing Author Nella Larsen
ISBN-10 9780486113463
Release 2012-03-05
Pages 112
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Married to a successful physician and prominently ensconced in society, Irene Redfield leads a charmed existence — until a chance encounter with a childhood friend who has been "passing for white."



Race Manhood and Modernism in America

Race  Manhood  and Modernism in America Author Mark Whalan
ISBN-10 1572335807
Release 2007
Pages 294
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Race, Manhood, and Modernism in America offers the first extended comparison between American writers Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941) and Jean Toomer (1894-1967), examining their engagement with the ideas of "Young American" writers and critics such as Van Wyck Brooks, Paul Rosenfeld, and Waldo Frank. This distinctively modernist school was developing unique visions of how race, gender, and region would be transformed as America entered an age of mass consumerism. Focusing on Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio (1919), and Toomer's Cane (1923), Race, Manhood, and Modernism in America brings Anderson and Toomer together in a way that allows for a thorough historical and social contextualization that is often missing from assessments of these two literary talents and of modernism as a whole. The book suggests how the gay subcultures of Chicago and the traumatic events of the Great War provoked Anderson's anxieties over the future of male gender identity, anxieties that are reflected in Winesburg, Ohio. Mark Whalan discusses Anderson's primitivistic attraction to African American communities and his ambivalent attitudes toward race, attitudes that were embedded in the changing cultural and gendered landscape of mass mechanical production. The book next examines how Toomer aimed to broaden the racial basis of American cultural nationalism, often inspired by the same cultural critics who had influenced Anderson. He rejected the ethnographically based model of tapping the "buried cultures" of ethnic minorities developed by his mentor, Waldo Frank, and also parted with the "folk" aesthetic endorsed by intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance. Instead, Toomer'' monumental Cane turned to discourses of physical culture, machine technology, and illegitimacy as ways of conceiving of a new type of manhood that refashioned commonplace notions of racial identity. Taken together, these discussions provide a fresh, interdisciplinary appraisal of the importance of race to "Young America," suggest provocative new directions for scholarship, and give new insight into some of the most crucial texts of U.S. interracial modernism. Mark Whalan is a senior lecturer in American literature and culture at the University of Exeter. He is the editor of The Letters of Jean Toomer, 1919-1924, and his articles have appeared in the Journal of American Studies, Modernism/Modernity, Studies in American Fiction, and Modern Fiction Studies.



Her Privates We

Her Privates We Author Frederic Manning
ISBN-10 8087888596
Release 2013-11
Pages 236
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A new edition of a classic war novel, a brilliant and bitter picture of human conflict



Youth Heart of Darkness The End of the Tether

Youth  Heart of Darkness  The End of the Tether Author Joseph Conrad
ISBN-10 9780521197991
Release 2010-10-07
Pages 475
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'Youth', Heart of Darkness and 'The End of the Tether' make up Conrad's most celebrated collection of short narratives. Heart of Darkness forms its sombre centrepiece: set in the Congo of the 1890s, this haunting and widely influential Modernist masterpiece explores the limits of human experience as well as the nightmarish realities and consequences of imperialism. The Cambridge edition presents this trio of stories and Conrad's preface to the collection in forms more authoritative than any so far published. The introduction situates the stories in Conrad's publishing career, traces their sources and surveys contemporary reception. The edition includes detailed explanatory and contextual notes, a glossary of nautical terms, maps and illustrations. A textual essay and comprehensive apparatus reveal the history of each story's composition, revision and publication. This volume will allow scholars to see these familiar stories in a fresh light, by returning to Conrad's original texts.



Passing and the Fictions of Identity

Passing and the Fictions of Identity Author Elaine K. Ginsberg
ISBN-10 0822317648
Release 1996-04-29
Pages 298
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Passing refers to the process whereby a person of one race, gender, nationality, or sexual orientation adopts the guise of another. Historically, this has often involved black slaves passing as white in order to gain their freedom. More generally, it has served as a way for women and people of color to access male or white privilege. In their examination of this practice of crossing boundaries, the contributors to this volume offer a unique perspective for studying the construction and meaning of personal and cultural identities. These essays consider a wide range of texts and moments from colonial times to the present that raise significant questions about the political motivations inherent in the origins and maintenance of identity categories and boundaries. Through discussions of such literary works as Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, The Autobiography of an Ex–Coloured Man, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Hidden Hand, Black Like Me, and Giovanni’s Room, the authors examine issues of power and privilege and ways in which passing might challenge the often rigid structures of identity politics. Their interrogation of the semiotics of behavior, dress, language, and the body itself contributes significantly to an understanding of national, racial, gender, and sexual identity in American literature and culture. Contextualizing and building on the theoretical work of such scholars as Judith Butler, Diana Fuss, Marjorie Garber, and Henry Louis Gates Jr., Passing and the Fictions of Identity will be of value to students and scholars working in the areas of race, gender, and identity theory, as well as U.S. history and literature. Contributors. Martha Cutter, Katharine Nicholson Ings, Samira Kawash, Adrian Piper, Valerie Rohy, Marion Rust, Julia Stern, Gayle Wald, Ellen M. Weinauer, Elizabeth Young



Modernism and the Ordinary

Modernism and the Ordinary Author Liesl Olson
ISBN-10 9780199349784
Release 2014-04-03
Pages 216
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Traditionally literary modernism has been seen as a movement marked by transcendent epiphanies, episodes of estrangement, and a privileging of the extraordinary. Yet modernist writings often take great pains to describe the material, seemingly insignificant details of daily life. Modernism and the Ordinary upends our perceived notions of the period's literature as it recognizes just how pivotal commonplace activities are to modernist aesthetics. Through pointed readings of prose and poetry from both the U. S. and abroad, Liesl Olson highlights the variety of ways modernist writers represented the quotidian details of modern life, even during times of political crisis and war. Run of the mill experiences like walking to work, eating a sandwich, or mending a dress were often resistant to shock, and these daily actions presented a counter-force to the aesthetic of heightened affect with which modernism is often associated. In a series of persuasively argued chapters, we see how the ordinary operates in its many modernist manifestations: the minutiae of list-making and the decidedly unheroic qualities of Bloom in Joyce's Ulysses; Virginia Woolf's rendering of the ordinary as an affective experience in Mrs. Dalloway; the retreat into daily routine as a refuge from the tumult of World War II in Gertrude Stein's Mrs. Reynolds; Wallace Steven's conception of the commonplace as rooted in pragmatist philosophy; and how Beckett and Proust are simultaneously compelled and repelled by the banalities of modern life. These works are read alongside the ideas of philosophers such as William James, Henri Bergson, and Henri Lefebvre to illustrate how these artists responded to the difficulty of representing the mundane without making it transcendent. A trenchant, richly textured monograph, Modernism and the Ordinary reveals how the non-transformative power of everyday experiences-what Virginia Woolf called the "cotton wool of daily life"-exerts a profound influence on the epoch-defining art of some of the twentieth century's most celebrated writers.



Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung Author Lester Bangs
ISBN-10 9781847655585
Release 2013-10-24
Pages 654
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Until his death aged thirty-three in 1982, Lester Bangs wrote wired, rock 'n' roll pieces on Iggy Pop, The Clash, John Lennon, Kraftwerk, Lou Reed. As a rock critic, he had an eagle-eye for distinguishing the pre-packaged imitation from the real thing; written in a conversational, wisecracking, erotically charged style, his hallucinatory hagiographies and excoriating take-downs reveal an iconoclast unafraid to tell it like it is. To his journalism he brought the talent of a great a renegade Beat poet, and his essays, reviews and scattered notes convey the electric thrill of a music junky indulging the habit of a lifetime. As Greil Marcus writes in his introduction, 'What this book demands from a reader is a willingness to accept that the best writer in America could write almost nothing but record reviews.'



The Quarry Wood

The Quarry Wood Author Nan Shepherd
ISBN-10 9781847678010
Release 2010-07-01
Pages 224
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When Martha accepts a place at university, her decision is met with a mixture of hostility and pride by her uncomprehending family. This is the story of a young woman's journey to maturity and independence, struggling to cope with the intellectual and emotional challenges that surround her, at a time when such space was rarely given freely to women. In The Quarry Wood, Nan Shepherd's subtle prose is matched by intense and memorable descriptions of the natural world, and a dry sense of humour. Ninety years after its first publication, it remains as fresh and original today.



Liberating Literature

Liberating Literature Author Maria Lauret
ISBN-10 9781134920952
Release 2002-09-11
Pages 256
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Liberating Literature is, primarily, a bold and revealing book about feminist writers, readers, and texts. But is is also much more than that. Within this volume Maria Lauret manages to look with fresh vision at the American Civil Rights movement of the 1960s; socialist women's writing of the 1930s; the emergence of the New Left; and the second wave women's movement and its cultural practices. Lauret's historicisation of feminist political writing allows for a new definition of the genre, and enables her to illuminate the profound influence and importance of African-American women's writing. Well-grounded historically and theoretically, Liberating Literature speaks about and to a political and cultural tradition, and offers stunning new readings of both familiar and neglected novels within the feminist canon. Reader and students of feminist fiction cannot afford to be without this major new work.