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Sisters in the Struggle

Sisters in the Struggle Author Bettye Collier-Thomas
ISBN-10 0814716032
Release 2001-08-01
Pages 363
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Tells the stories and documents the contributions of African American women involved in the struggle for racial and gender equality through the civil rights and black power movements in the United States.



Sisters in the Struggle

Sisters in the Struggle Author Bettye Collier-Thomas
ISBN-10 9780814716021
Release 2001-08-01
Pages 363
Download Link Click Here

Tells the stories and documents the contributions of African American women involved in the struggle for racial and gender equality through the civil rights and black power movements in the United States.



Sisters in the Struggle

Sisters in the Struggle Author Bettye Collier-Thomas
ISBN-10 9780814772348
Release 2001-08-01
Pages 363
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Women were at the forefront of the civil rights struggle, but their indvidiual stories were rarely heard. Only recently have historians begun to recognize the central role women played in the battle for racial equality. In Sisters in the Struggle, we hear about the unsung heroes of the civil rights movements such as Ella Baker, who helped found the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper who took on segregation in the Democratic party (and won), and Septima Clark, who created a network of "Citizenship Schools" to teach poor Black men and women to read and write and help them to register to vote. We learn of Black women's activism in the Black Panther Party where they fought the police, as well as the entrenched male leadership, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where the behind-the-scenes work of women kept the organization afloat when it was under siege. It also includes first-person testimonials from the women who made headlines with their courageous resistance to segregation—Rosa Parks, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, and Dorothy Height. This collection represents the coming of age of African-American women's history and presents new stories that point the way to future study. Contributors: Bettye Collier-Thomas, Vicki Crawford, Cynthia Griggs Fleming, V. P. Franklin, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Farah Jasmine Griffin, Duchess Harris, Sharon Harley, Dorothy I. Height, Chana Kai Lee, Tracye Matthews, Genna Rae McNeil, Rosa Parks, Barbara Ransby, Jacqueline A. Rouse, Elaine Moore Smith, and Linda Faye Williams.



Jesus Jobs and Justice

Jesus  Jobs  and Justice Author Bettye Collier-Thomas
ISBN-10 0307593053
Release 2010-02-02
Pages 736
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“The Negroes must have Jesus, Jobs, and Justice,” declared Nannie Helen Burroughs, a nationally known figure among black and white leaders and an architect of the Woman’s Convention of the National Baptist Convention. Burroughs made this statement about the black women’s agenda in 1958, as she anticipated the collapse of Jim Crow segregation and pondered the fate of African Americans. Following more than half a century of organizing and struggling against racism in American society, sexism in the National Baptist Convention, and the racism and paternalism of white women and the Southern Baptist Convention, Burroughs knew that black Americans would need more than religion to survive and to advance socially, economically, and politically. Jesus, jobs, and justice are the threads that weave through two hundred years of black women’s experiences in America. Bettye Collier-Thomas’s groundbreaking book gives us a remarkable account of the religious faith, social and political activism, and extraordinary resilience of black women during the centuries of American growth and change. It shows the beginnings of organized religion in slave communities and how the Bible was a source of inspiration; the enslaved saw in their condition a parallel to the suffering and persecution that Jesus had endured. The author makes clear that while religion has been a guiding force in the lives of most African Americans, for black women it has been essential. As co-creators of churches, women were a central factor in their development. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice explores the ways in which women had to cope with sexism in black churches, as well as racism in mostly white denominations, in their efforts to create missionary societies and form women’s conventions. It also reveals the hidden story of how issues of sex and sexuality have sometimes created tension and divisions within institutions. Black church women created national organizations such as the National Association of Colored Women, the National League of Colored Republican Women, and the National Council of Negro Women. They worked in the interracial movement, in white-led Christian groups such as the YWCA and Church Women United, and in male-dominated organizations such as the NAACP and National Urban League to demand civil rights, equal employment, and educational opportunities, and to protest lynching, segregation, and discrimination. And black women missionaries sacrificed their lives in service to their African sisters whose destiny they believed was tied to theirs. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice restores black women to their rightful place in American and black history and demonstrates their faith in themselves, their race, and their God. From the Hardcover edition.



Want to Start a Revolution

Want to Start a Revolution Author Dayo F. Gore
ISBN-10 9780814783146
Release 2009-12-01
Pages 353
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The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman? From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle. Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fernández, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.



Women and the Civil Rights Movement 1954 1965

Women and the Civil Rights Movement  1954 1965 Author Davis W. Houck
ISBN-10 9781604737608
Release 2009
Pages 351
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Presents thirty-nine full-text addresses by women who spoke out while the struggle for civil rights was at its most intense. Many are published or transcribed from audio tape for the first time. Each speech is preceded by an introduction of the speaker and occasion that highlights key biographical and background details. The collection also provides a general introduction that places these public addresses in context.



Gender in the Civil Rights Movement

Gender in the Civil Rights Movement Author Peter J. Ling
ISBN-10 9781135669065
Release 2014-03-05
Pages 350
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First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.



My Soul Is a Witness

My Soul Is a Witness Author Prof. Bettye Collier-Thomas
ISBN-10 9781250107725
Release 2015-12-15
Pages 288
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A powerful and inspiring record of one of the most significant periods in America's history, which presents the full historic scope of the hard-fought battle for civil rights. From the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, in which legal segregation in public schools was declared unconstitutional, to the Nashville sit-ins organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and from the Freedom Rides to the March on Washington, to the subsequent passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965-and covering everything in between--Bettye Collier-Thomas and V. P. Franklin's My Soul Is a Witness is the first comprehensive chronology of the civil rights era in America. This unique chronology extends the examination of civil rights activities beyond the South to include the North, Midwest, and Far West. Although Martin Luther King, Jr. was a towering figure during the era, the authors shift the focus to the thousands of people, places, and events that encompassed the Civil Rights movement. Each entry is based on information found in articles and reports published in three newspaper and periodical sources: The New York Times, Jet Magazine, and the Southern School News. Supplementing the basic chronology are longer features that explore larger topics in more depth and highlight issues well-known at the time but unknown today by scholars and the general public.



Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa Author Keith A. Mayes
ISBN-10 9780415998543
Release 2009
Pages 288
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Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition explores the beginning and expansion of Kwanzaa, from its start as a Black Power holiday, to its place as one of the most mainstream black holiday traditions.



Freedom s Daughters

Freedom s Daughters Author Lynne Olson
ISBN-10 9780684850122
Release 2001
Pages 460
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Profiles the fearless, resourceful female leaders of the civil rights movement, including Ida Wells, who led the protest against lynching, and Jo Ann Robinson, who helped launch the Montgomery bus boycott.



Courage to Dissent

Courage to Dissent Author Tomiko Brown-Nagin
ISBN-10 0199831599
Release 2011-02-09
Pages 608
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In this Bancroft Prize-winning history of the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta from the end of World War II to 1980, Tomiko Brown-Nagin shows that long before "black power" emerged and gave black dissent from the mainstream civil rights agenda a name, African Americans in Atlanta questioned the meaning of equality and the steps necessary to obtain a share of the American dream. This groundbreaking book uncovers the activism of visionaries--both well-known figures and unsung citizens--from across the ideological spectrum who sought something different from, or more complicated than, "integration." Local activists often played leading roles in carrying out the agenda of the NAACP, but some also pursued goals that differed markedly from those of the venerable civil rights organization. Brown-Nagin documents debates over politics, housing, public accommodations, and schools. Exploring the complex interplay between the local and national, between lawyers and communities, between elites and grassroots, and between middle-class and working-class African Americans, Courage to Dissent transforms our understanding of the Civil Rights era.



How Long How Long

How Long  How Long Author Belinda Robnett
ISBN-10 0199761698
Release 2000-01-13
Pages 272
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A compelling and readable narrative history, How Long? How Long? presents both a rethinking of social movement theory and a controversial thesis: that chroniclers have egregiously neglected the most important leaders of the Civil Rights movement, African-American women, in favor of higher-profile African-American men and white women. Author Belinda Robnett argues that the diversity of experiences of the African-American women organizers has been underemphasized in favor of monolithic treatments of their femaleness and blackness. Drawing heavily on interviews with actual participants in the American Civil Rights movement, this work retells the movement as seen through the eyes and spoken through the voices of African-American women participants. It is the first book to provide an analysis of race, class, gender, and culture as substructures that shaped the organization and outcome of the movement. Robnett examines the differences among women participants in the movement and offers the first cohesive analysis of the gendered relations and interactions among its black activists, thus demonstrating that femaleness and blackness cannot be viewed as sufficient signifiers for movement experience and individual identity. Finally, this book makes a significant contribution to social movement theory by providing a crucial understanding of the continuity and complexity of social movements, clarifying the need for different layers of leadership that come to satisfy different movement needs. An engaging narrative history as well as a major contribution to social movement and feminist theory, How Long? How Long? will appeal to students and scholars of social activism, women's studies, American history, and African-American studies, and to general readers interested in the perennially fascinating story of the American Civil Rights movement.



Pure Fire

Pure Fire Author Christopher B. Strain
ISBN-10 0820326879
Release 2005
Pages 254
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In this study of self-defense as it was debated and practiced during the civil rights era, the decision to defend oneself and family is reframed in terms of a daily concern for many African Americans who faced the continual menace of white aggression. Simultaneous.



Florynce Flo Kennedy

Florynce    Flo    Kennedy Author Sherie M. Randolph
ISBN-10 9781469623924
Release 2015-09-28
Pages 328
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Often photographed in a cowboy hat with her middle finger held defiantly in the air, Florynce "Flo" Kennedy (1916–2000) left a vibrant legacy as a leader of the Black Power and feminist movements. In the first biography of Kennedy, Sherie M. Randolph traces the life and political influence of this strikingly bold and controversial radical activist. Rather than simply reacting to the predominantly white feminist movement, Kennedy brought the lessons of Black Power to white feminism and built bridges in the struggles against racism and sexism. Randolph narrates Kennedy's progressive upbringing, her pathbreaking graduation from Columbia Law School, and her long career as a media-savvy activist, showing how Kennedy rose to founding roles in organizations such as the National Black Feminist Organization and the National Organization for Women, allying herself with both white and black activists such as Adam Clayton Powell, H. Rap Brown, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm. Making use of an extensive and previously uncollected archive, Randolph demonstrates profound connections within the histories of the new left, civil rights, Black Power, and feminism, showing that black feminism was pivotal in shaping postwar U.S. liberation movements.



Remaking Black Power

Remaking Black Power Author Ashley D. Farmer
ISBN-10 9781469634388
Release 2017-10-10
Pages 288
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In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that sexism relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the importance of women and gender to Black Power organizing, causing many of the era's organizations and leaders to critique patriarchy and support gender equality. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.



Southern Black Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Southern Black Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement Author Bruce A. Glasrud
ISBN-10 9781603449465
Release 2013-03-28
Pages 236
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Throughout the South, black women were crucial to the Civil Rights Movement, serving as grassroots and organizational leaders. They protested, participated, sat in, mobilized, created, energized, led particular efforts, and served as bridge builders to the rest of the community. Ignored at the time by white politicians and the media alike, with few exceptions they worked behind the scenes to effect the changes all in the movement sought. Until relatively recently, historians, too, have largely ignored their efforts. Although African American women mobilized all across Dixie, their particular strategies took different forms in different states, just as the opposition they faced from white segregationists took different shapes. Studies of what happened at the state and local levels are critical not only because of what black women accomplished, but also because their activism, leadership, and courage demonstrated the militancy needed for a mass movement. In this volume, scholars address similarities and variations by providing case studies of the individual states during the 1950s and 1960s, laying the groundwork for more synthetic analyses of the circumstances, factors, and strategies used by black women in the former Confederate states to destroy the system of segregation in this country.



Bus Ride to Justice

Bus Ride to Justice Author Fred D. Gray
ISBN-10 9781588382863
Release 2012-10-01
Pages 428
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"Lawyer for Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Montgomery bus boycott, the Tuskegee syphilis study, the desegregation of Alabama schools and the Selma march, and founder of the Tuskegee human and civil rights multicultural center."