Download or read online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.

Slim s Table

Slim s Table Author Mitchell Duneier
ISBN-10 9780226413563
Release 2015-12-21
Pages 200
Download Link Click Here

At the Valois "See Your Food" cafeteria on Chicago's South Side, black and white men gather over cups of coffee and steam-table food. Mitchell Duneier, a sociologist, spent four years at the Valois writing this moving profile of the black men who congregate at "Slim's Table." Praised as "a marvelous study of those who should not be forgotten" by the Wall Street Journal,Slim's Table helps demolish the narrow sociological picture of black men and simple media-reinforced stereotypes. In between is a "respectable" citizenry, too often ignored and little understood. "Slim's Table is an astonishment. Duneier manages to fling open windows of perception into what it means to be working-class black, how a caring community can proceed from the most ordinary transactions, all the while smashing media-induced stereotypes of the races and race relations."—Citation for Chicago Sun Times Chicago Book of the Year Award "An instant classic of ethnography that will provoke debate and provide insight for years to come."—Michael Eric Dyson, Chicago Tribune "Mr. Duneier sees the subjects of his study as people and he sees the scale of their lives as fully human, rather than as diminished versions of grander lives lived elsewhere by people of another color. . . . A welcome antidote to trends in both journalism and sociology."—Roger Wilkins, New York Times Book Review



The End Game

The End Game Author Corey M. Abramson
ISBN-10 9780674743953
Release 2015
Pages 244
Download Link Click Here

Senior citizens face a gauntlet of physical, psychological, and social hurdles. But do disadvantages accumulated over a lifetime make the final years especially difficult for some people? Or does the quality of life among poor and affluent seniors converge? Corey Abramson investigates whether lifelong inequality structures the lives of the elderly.



Global Inequalities in World Systems Perspective

Global Inequalities in World Systems Perspective Author Manuela Boatca
ISBN-10 9781351588935
Release 2017-09-22
Pages 206
Download Link Click Here

During its 500-year history, the modern world-system has seen several shifts in hegemony. Yet, since the decline of the U.S. in the 1970s, no single core power has attained a hegemonic position in an increasingly polarized world. As income inequalities have become more pronounced in core countries, especially in the U.S. and the U.K., global inequalities emerged as a "new" topic of social scientific scholarship, ignoring the constant move toward polarization that has been characteristic of the entire modern world-system. At the same time, the rise of new states (most notably, the BRICS) and the relative economic growth of particular regions (especially East Asia) have prompted speculations about the next hegemon that largely disregard both the longue durée of hegemonic shifts and the constraints that regional differentiations place on the concentration of capital and geopolitical power in one location. Authors in this book place the issue of rising inequalities at the center of their analyses. They explore the concept and reality of semiperipheries in the 21st century world-system, the role of the state and of transnational migration in current patterns of global stratification, types of catching-up development and new spatial configurations of inequality in Europe’s Eastern periphery as well as the prospects for the Global Left in the new systemic order. The book links novel theoretical debates on the rise of global inequalities to methodologically innovative approaches to the urgent task of addressing them.



The Lucky Ones

The Lucky Ones Author Mae Ngai
ISBN-10 9780691155326
Release 2012
Pages 326
Download Link Click Here

Traces three generations of a Chinese-American family from its patriarch's self-invention as an immigration broker in post-gold rush San Francisco to the family's intimate involvement in the 1904 World's Fair.



Sidewalk

Sidewalk Author Mitchell Duneier
ISBN-10 0374527253
Release 2001
Pages 383
Download Link Click Here

Presents the lives of poor African-American men who make their subsistence wages by selling used goods on the streets of Greenwich Village in New York; and discusses how they interact with passing pedestrians, police officers, and each other.



Only Hope

Only Hope Author Vanessa L. Fong
ISBN-10 080475330X
Release 2004
Pages 242
Download Link Click Here

This is the first book to examine the high-pressure lives of teenagers born under China's one-child family policy. Based on a survey of 2,273 students and 27 months of participant-observation in Chinese homes and schools, it explores the social, economic, and psychological consequences of the one-child policy.



Race and Reparations

Race and Reparations Author Clarence J. Munford
ISBN-10 0865435111
Release 1996
Pages 565
Download Link Click Here

An analysis of both the history and future of Black oppression and Black nationalism, with a call for raised consciousness in the Black community and renewed activism. Munford (history Black studies, Guelph U., Ontario) has taught in Nigerian, European, and US universities, and has written extensive



Masculinity in the Black Imagination

Masculinity in the Black Imagination Author Ronald L. Jackson
ISBN-10 1433112485
Release 2011
Pages 243
Download Link Click Here

How do Black men imagine who they are and what they must do ...within their families, communities, and the world?<BR> The essays in this collection both ask and attempt to answer this question. Based in communication, and drawing from diverse disciplines, <I>Masculinity in the Black Imagination seeks to address identity, race, and gender by examining the communicative dimensions of Black manhood. The collection works to define, deconstruct, and contextualize the interactive practice of masculinity as both a local and global phenomenon.



Jane Addams and the Men of the Chicago School 1892 1918

Jane Addams and the Men of the Chicago School  1892 1918 Author Mary Jo Deegan
ISBN-10 9781351511148
Release 2017-07-12
Pages 369
Download Link Click Here

Jane Addams is well known for her leadership in urban reform, social settlements, pacifism, social work, and women's suffrage.The men of the Chicago School are well known for their leadership in founding sociology and the study of urban life.What has remained hidden however, is that Jane Addams played a pivotal role in the development of sociology and worked closely with the male faculty at the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. By using extensive archival material, Mary Jo Deegan is the first to document Addams's sociological significance and the existence of a sexual division of labor during the founding years of the discipline. As the leader of the women's network, Addams was able to bridge these two spheres of work and knowledge.Through an analysis of the changing relations between the male and female networks, Deegan shows that the Chicago men varied widely in their understanding and acceptance of her sociological though and action.Despite this variation, it was through her work with the men of the Chicago School that Addams left a legacy for sociology as a way of thinking, an area of study, and a methodological approach to data collecting. This previously unexamined heritage of American sociology will be of value to anyone interested in the history of the social sciences, especially sociology and social work, the development of American social thought, the role of professional women, the Progressive Era, and the intellectual contributions of Jane Addams.



How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America

How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America Author Manning Marable
ISBN-10 9781608465125
Release 2015-11-02
Pages 372
Download Link Click Here

"How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America is one of those paradigm-shifting, life-changing texts that has not lost its currency or relevance—even after three decades. Its provocative treatise on the ravages of late capitalism, state violence, incarceration, and patriarchy on the life chances and struggles of black working-class men and women shaped an entire generation, directing our energies to the terrain of the prison-industrial complex, anti-racist work, labor organizing, alternatives to racial capitalism, and challenging patriarchy—personally and politically."—Robin D. G. Kelley "In this new edition of his classic text . . . Marable can challenge a new generation to find solutions to the problems that constrain the present but not our potential to seek and define a better future."—Henry Louis Gates, Jr. "[A] prescient analysis."—Michael Eric Dyson How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America is a classic study of the intersection of racism and class in the United States. It has become a standard text for courses in American politics and history, and has been central to the education of thousands of political activists since the 1980s. This edition is prsented with a new foreword by Leith Mullings.



God s Choice

God s Choice Author Alan Peshkin
ISBN-10 0226661997
Release 1988-06-15
Pages 360
Download Link Click Here

Is Bethany Baptist Academy God's choice? Ask the fundamentalist Christians who teach there or whose children attend the academy, and their answer will be a yes as unequivocal as their claim that the Bible is God's inerrant, absolute word. Is this truth or arrogance? In God's Choice, Alan Peshkin offers readers the opportunity to consider this question in depth. Given the outsider's rare chance to observe such a school firsthand, Peshkin spent eighteen months studying Bethany's high school—interviewing students, parents, and educators, living in the home of Bethany Baptist Church members, and participating fully in the church's activities. From this intimate research he has fashioned a rich account of Christian schooling and an informed analysis of a clear alternative to public education.



Pitied But Not Entitled

Pitied But Not Entitled Author Linda Gordon
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105017238861
Release 1995
Pages 433
Download Link Click Here

When Americans denounce "welfare", most are thinking of the program of aid for single mothers and their children--the only program of the Social Security Act to become stigmatized. Gordon uncovers the tangled roots of competing visions of welfare and shows that welfare reform can only work if it recognizes that single motherhood is an enduring aspect of contemporary life.



They and We

They and We Author Peter I. Rose
ISBN-10 9781317264545
Release 2015-11-17
Pages 334
Download Link Click Here

The first edition of They and We appeared shortly after the March on Washington, where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his memorable "I Have a Dream" speech. It was published just before the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed by Congress. The book, read by tens of thousands, has been updated and expanded five times, each edition maintaining the original intention of the author to provide grounding in the sociological study of inter-group relations: examining prejudice, discrimination, minority status and other core concepts in straightforward, jargon-free prose, as well as tracking social, economic, political and legal developments. The new, 7th (50th anniversary) edition of They and We continues the tradition, depicting recent demographic changes and persisting patterns (such as the 'leapfrog' phenomenon, where, as in the past, many African-Americans are left behind as newer groups move in, up, and over). It also covers new developments, including the rise of Islamophobia in the wake of 9/11. An entirely new chapter compares perspectives in the United States with situations overseas, particularly with regard to nativist and nationalist movements and the rise of xenophobia in this society and in many others.



Ghetto

Ghetto Author Mitchell Duneier
ISBN-10 9781429942751
Release 2016-04-19
Pages 304
Download Link Click Here

A New York Times Notable Book of 2016 Winner of the Zócalo Public Square Book Prize On March 29, 1516, the city council of Venice issued a decree forcing Jews to live in il geto—a closed quarter named for the copper foundry that once occupied the area. The term stuck. In this sweeping and original account, Mitchell Duneier traces the idea of the ghetto from its beginnings in the sixteenth century and its revival by the Nazis to the present. As Duneier shows, we cannot comprehend the entanglements of race, poverty, and place in America today without recalling the ghettos of Europe, as well as earlier efforts to understand the problems of the American city. Ghetto is the story of the scholars and activists who tried to achieve that understanding. As Duneier shows, their efforts to wrestle with race and poverty cannot be divorced from their individual biographies, which often included direct encounters with prejudice and discrimination in the academy and elsewhere. Using new and forgotten sources, Duneier introduces us to Horace Cayton and St. Clair Drake, graduate students whose conception of the South Side of Chicago established a new paradigm for thinking about Northern racism and poverty in the 1940s. We learn how the psychologist Kenneth Clark subsequently linked Harlem’s slum conditions with the persistence of black powerlessness, and we follow the controversy over Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s report on the black family. We see how the sociologist William Julius Wilson redefined the debate about urban America as middle-class African Americans increasingly escaped the ghetto and the country retreated from racially specific remedies. And we trace the education reformer Geoffrey Canada’s efforts to transform the lives of inner-city children with ambitious interventions, even as other reformers sought to help families escape their neighborhoods altogether. Duneier offers a clear-eyed assessment of the thinkers and doers who have shaped American ideas about urban poverty—and the ghetto. The result is a valuable new estimation of an age-old concept.



Selling the Race

Selling the Race Author Adam Green
ISBN-10 9780226306414
Release 2007
Pages 306
Download Link Click Here

"In his study, Green tells the story of how this unified consciousness was shaped. With this portrayal of black life - complemented by a dozen works of the Chicago photographer Wayne F. Miller - Green ultimately presents African Americans as agents, rather than casualties, of modernity, reenvisioning urban existence in a way that will resonate with anyone interested in race, culture, or the life of cities."--Jacket.



Manliness and Its Discontents

Manliness and Its Discontents Author Martin Summers
ISBN-10 9780807864173
Release 2005-12-15
Pages 400
Download Link Click Here

In a pathbreaking new assessment of the shaping of black male identity in the early twentieth century, Martin Summers explores how middle-class African American and African Caribbean immigrant men constructed a gendered sense of self through organizational life, work, leisure, and cultural production. Examining both the public and private aspects of gender formation, Summers challenges the current trajectory of masculinity studies by treating black men as historical agents in their own identity formation, rather than as screens on which white men projected their own racial and gender anxieties and desires. Manliness and Its Discontents focuses on four distinct yet overlapping social milieus: the fraternal order of Prince Hall Freemasonry; the black nationalist Universal Negro Improvement Association, or the Garvey movement; the modernist circles of the Harlem Renaissance; and the campuses of historically black Howard and Fisk Universities. Between 1900 and 1930, Summers argues, dominant notions of what it meant to be a man within the black middle class changed from a Victorian ideal of manliness--characterized by the importance of producer values, respectability, and patriarchy--to a modern ethos of masculinity, which was shaped more by consumption, physicality, and sexuality. Summers evaluates the relationships between black men and black women as well as relationships among black men themselves, broadening our understanding of the way that gender works along with class, sexuality, and age to shape identities and produce relationships of power.



Remaking Respectability

Remaking Respectability Author Victoria W. Wolcott
ISBN-10 9781469611006
Release 2013-01-01
Pages 360
Download Link Click Here

In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved economic and political conditions in the urban North. The most visible of these migrants have been the male industrial workers who labored on the city's automobile assembly lines. African American women have largely been absent from traditional narratives of the Great Migration because they were excluded from industrial work. By placing these women at the center of her study, Victoria Wolcott reveals their vital role in shaping life in interwar Detroit. Wolcott takes us into the speakeasies, settlement houses, blues clubs, storefront churches, employment bureaus, and training centers of Prohibition- and depression-era Detroit. There, she explores the wide range of black women's experiences, focusing particularly on the interactions between working- and middle-class women. As Detroit's black population grew exponentially, women not only served as models of bourgeois respectability, but also began to reshape traditional standards of deportment in response to the new realities of their lives. In so doing, Wolcott says, they helped transform black politics and culture. Eventually, as the depression arrived, female respectability as a central symbol of reform was supplanted by a more strident working-class activism.