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Sugar Slavery and Freedom in Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico

Sugar  Slavery  and Freedom in Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico Author Luis A. Figueroa
ISBN-10 0807876836
Release 2006-05-18
Pages 304
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The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A. Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor after the 1873 abolition of slavery in colonial Puerto Rico. He corrects misconceptions about how ex-slaves went about building their lives and livelihoods after emancipation and debunks standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico. Historians have assumed that after emancipation in Puerto Rico, as in other parts of the Caribbean and the U.S. South, former slaves acquired some land of their own and became subsistence farmers. Figueroa finds that in Puerto Rico, however, this was not an option because both capital and land available for sale to the Afro-Puerto Rican population were scarce. Paying particular attention to class, gender, and race, his account of how these libertos joined the labor market profoundly revises our understanding of the emancipation process and the evolution of the working class in Puerto Rico.



Sugar Slavery and Freedom in Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico

Sugar  Slavery  and Freedom in Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico Author Luis A. Figueroa
ISBN-10 0847711250
Release 2005-09
Pages 290
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Sugar slavery and freedom in nineteenth century Puerto Rico

Sugar  slavery  and freedom in nineteenth century Puerto Rico Author Luis Antonio Figueroa
ISBN-10 0807829498
Release 2005
Pages 290
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The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A. Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor after the 1873 abolition of slavery in colonial Puerto Rico. He corrects misconceptions about how ex-slaves went about building their lives and livelihoods after emancipation and debunks standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico. Historians have assumed that after emancipation in Puerto Rico, as in other parts of the Caribbean and the U.S. South, former slaves acquired some land of their own and became subsistence farmers. Figueroa finds that in Puerto Rico, however, this was not an option because both capital and land available for sale to the Afro-Puerto Rican population were scarce. Paying particular attention to class, gender, and race, his account of how these libertos joined the labor market profoundly revises our understanding of the emancipation process and the evolution of the working class in Puerto Rico.



Not of Pure Blood

Not of Pure Blood Author Jay Kinsbruner
ISBN-10 0822318423
Release 1996
Pages 176
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"Based on examination of housing patterns in San Juan and demographic data from four of its 19th-century barrios, work provides a much-needed exploration of racial prejudice in Puerto Rico. Challenges commonplace denial of racial discrimination up to thep



The Slave s Rebellion

The Slave s Rebellion Author Adélékè Adéèkó
ISBN-10 0253111420
Release 2005-07-21
Pages 224
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Episodes of slave rebellions such as Nat Turner's are central to speculations on the trajectory of black history and the goal of black spiritual struggles. Using fiction, history, and oral poetry drawn from the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa, this book analyzes how writers reinterpret episodes of historical slave rebellion to conceptualize their understanding of an ideal "master-less" future. The texts range from Frederick Douglass's The Heroic Slave and Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of this World to Yoruba praise poetry and novels by Nigerian writers Adebayo Faleti and Akinwumi Isola. Each text reflects different "national" attitudes toward the historicity of slave rebellions that shape the ways the texts are read. This is an absorbing book about the grip of slavery and rebellion on modern black thought.



Slave Revolts in Puerto Rico

Slave Revolts in Puerto Rico Author Guillermo A. Baralt
ISBN-10 1558764631
Release 2007
Pages 180
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From the emergence of the first sugar plantations up until 1873, when slavery was abolished, the wealth amassed by many landowners in Puerto Rico derived mainly from the exploitation of slaves. But slavery generated its antithesis - disobedience, uprisings and flights. This book documents these expressions of collective resistance.



Emotional Bridges to Puerto Rico

Emotional Bridges to Puerto Rico Author Elizabeth M. Aranda
ISBN-10 0742543250
Release 2007
Pages 193
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Emotional Bridges to Puerto Rico is about Puerto Ricans' struggles of incorporation into U.S. society, and the conditions under which members of the Puerto Rican middle-class move back and forth between the mainland and island. The book illustrates how structures of inequalities based on race, class, and gender affect Puerto Ricans' subjective assessments of incorporation. Issues regarding the racialization of Puerto Ricans in the U.S. reveal that in spite of structural incorporation, Puerto Ricans do not feel like they fully belong in mainland society. These experiences carry implications for future migration and settlement decisions.



Our Landless Patria

Our Landless Patria Author Rosa E. Carrasquillo
ISBN-10 9780803215375
Release 2006
Pages 202
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In particular, marginal citizenship adopted patriarchy as a model to regulate social relations at home, failing to address gender inequalities and perpetuating class differences."--BOOK JACKET.



Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth century Hispanic Caribbean

Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth century Hispanic Caribbean Author Luis Martínez-Fernández
ISBN-10 0813529948
Release 2002
Pages 246
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Catholicism has long been recognized as one of the major forces shaping the Hispanic Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic) during the nineteenth century, but the role of Protestantism has not been fully explored. Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean traces the emergence of Protestantism in Cuba and Puerto Rico during a crucial period of national consolidation. Using a comparative framework, Martinez-Fernandez looks at the ways in which Protestantism, though officially illegal for most of the century, established itself, competed with Catholicism, and took differing paths in Cuba and Puerto Rico. One of the book's main goals is to trace the links between religion and politics, particularly with regard to early Protestant activities. Protestants encountered a complex social, economic, and political landscape both in Cuba and in Puerto Rico and soon found that their very presence involved them in a series of struggles in which the Catholic Church was embroiled along with the other main forces of the time - the peasantry, the agrarian and mercantile bourgeoisie, and the colonial state. While the Catholic Church increasi



Sugar Island Slavery in the Age of Enlightenment

Sugar Island Slavery in the Age of Enlightenment Author Arthur L. Stinchcombe
ISBN-10 1400822009
Release 1995-12-11
Pages 320
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Plantations, especially sugar plantations, created slave societies and a racism persisting well into post-slavery periods: so runs a familiar argument that has been used to explain the sweep of Caribbean history. Here one of the most eminent scholars of modern social theory applies this assertion to a comparative study of most Caribbean islands from the time of the American Revolution to the Spanish American War. Arthur Stinchcombe uses insights from his own much admired Economic Sociology to show why sugar planters needed the help of repressive governments for recruiting disciplined labor. Demonstrating that island-to-island variations on this theme were a function of geography, local political economy, and relation to outside powers, he scrutinizes Caribbean slavery and Caribbean emancipation movements in a world-historical context. Throughout the book, Stinchcombe aims to develop a sociology of freedom that explains a number of complex phenomena, such as how liberty for some individuals may restrict the liberty of others. Thus, the autonomous governments of colonies often produced more oppressive conditions for slaves than did so-called arbitrary governments, which had the power to restrict the whims of the planters. Even after emancipation, freedom was not a clear-cut matter of achieving the ideals of the Enlightenment. Indeed, it was often a route to a social control more efficient than slavery, providing greater flexibility for the planter class and posing less risk of violent rebellion.



Slave Families and the Hato Economy in Puerto Rico

Slave Families and the Hato Economy in Puerto Rico Author David M. Stark
ISBN-10 0813054737
Release 2017-05
Pages 272
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"Deftly uses the available parish registers to document the stages of the coming of African men and women to Puerto Rico in the eighteenth century and reveals patterns of family formation and bonds of solidarity among the African slaves and with the rest of society."-- Fernando Pico, author of Puerto Rico Remembered "An exceptionally well researched, highly original, cogently argued and engagingly written work."--Franklin W. Knight, coeditor of Contemporary Caribbean Cultures and Societies in a Global Context "A welcome contribution to the history of eighteenth-century Puerto Rico and an important model for anyone using sacramental records to study slave life in colonial Latin America."--David Wheat, Michigan State University Scholarship on slavery in the Caribbean frequently emphasizes sugar and tobacco production, but this unique work illustrates the importance of the region's hato economy--a combination of livestock ranching, foodstuff cultivation, and timber harvesting--on the living patterns among slave communities. David Stark makes use of extensive Catholic parish records to provide a comprehensive examination of slavery in Puerto Rico and across the Spanish Caribbean. He reconstructs slave families to examine incidences of marriage, as well as birth and death rates. The result are never-before-analyzed details on how many enslaved Africans came to Puerto Rico, where they came from, and how their populations grew through natural increase. Stark convincingly argues that when animal husbandry drove much of the island's economy, slavery was less harsh than in better-known plantation regimes geared toward crop cultivation. Slaves in the hato economy experienced more favorable conditions for family formation, relatively relaxed work regimes, higher fertility rates, and lower mortality rates.



Worker in the Cane

Worker in the Cane Author Sidney Wilfred Mintz
ISBN-10 0393007316
Release 1974
Pages 288
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This is the absorbing story of Don Taso, a Puerto Rican sugar cane worker, and of his family and the village in which he lives. Told largely in his own words, it is a vivid account of the drastic changes taking place in Puerto Rico, as he sees them.Worker In The Cane is both a profound social document and a moving spiritual testimony. Don Taso portrays his harsh childhood, his courtship and early marriage, his grim struggle to provide for his family. He tells of his radical political beliefs and union activity during the Depression and describes his hardships when he was blacklisted because of his outspoken convictions. Embittered by his continuing poverty and by a serious illness, he undergoes a dramatic cure and becomes converted to a Protestant revivalist sect. In the concluding chapters the author interprets Don Taso's experience in the light of the rapidly changing patterns of life in rural Puerto Rico.



After Slavery

After Slavery Author Howard Temperley
ISBN-10 9781135782238
Release 2013-01-11
Pages 320
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A collection of essays in which every contributor focuses upon some aspect of slave emancipation with the aim of assessing to what extent the outcome met with expectation. The hopes and disappointments that characterized the transition from slavery to freedom are depicted.



Slavery Freedom and Abolition in Latin America and the Atlantic World

Slavery  Freedom  and Abolition in Latin America and the Atlantic World Author Christopher Schmidt-Nowara
ISBN-10 9780826339058
Release 2011-06-22
Pages 222
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The last New World countries to abolish slavery were Cuba and Brazil, more than twenty years after slave emancipation in the United States. Why slavery was so resilient and how people in Latin America fought against it are the subjects of this compelling study. Beginning with the roots of African slavery in the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Iberian empires, this work explores central issues, including the transatlantic slave trade, labor, Afro-Latin American cultures, racial identities in colonial slave societies, and the spread of antislavery ideas and social movements. A study of Latin America, this work, with its Atlantic-world framework, will also appeal to students of slavery and abolition in other Atlantic empires and nation-states in the early modern and modern eras.



Slavery Freedom and Gender

Slavery  Freedom and Gender Author B. W. Higman
ISBN-10 9766401373
Release 2003
Pages 297
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A collection of lectures delivered between 1987 and 1998. The book is divided into two sections: slavery and freedom, which features critical research on slavery and post-emancipation society, and gender.



Race in Another America

Race in Another America Author Edward Eric Telles
ISBN-10 0691118663
Release 2004
Pages 324
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This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date book on the increasingly important and controversial subject of race relations in Brazil. North American scholars of race relations frequently turn to Brazil for comparisons, since its history has many key similarities to that of the United States. Brazilians have commonly compared themselves with North Americans, and have traditionally argued that race relations in Brazil are far more harmonious because the country encourages race mixture rather than formal or informal segregation. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this national myth, seeking to show that race relations are characterized by exclusion, not inclusion, and that fair-skinned Brazilians continue to be privileged and hold a disproportionate share of wealth and power. In this sociological and demographic study, Edward Telles seeks to understand the reality of race in Brazil and how well it squares with these traditional and revisionist views of race relations. He shows that both schools have it partly right--that there is far more miscegenation in Brazil than in the United States--but that exclusion remains a serious problem. He blends his demographic analysis with ethnographic fieldwork, history, and political theory to try to "understand" the enigma of Brazilian race relations--how inclusiveness can coexist with exclusiveness. The book also seeks to understand some of the political pathologies of buying too readily into unexamined ideas about race relations. In the end, Telles contends, the traditional myth that Brazil had harmonious race relations compared with the United States encouraged the government to do almost nothing to address its shortcomings.



Empire and Antislavery

Empire and Antislavery Author Christopher Schmidt-Nowara
ISBN-10 9780822971986
Release 1999
Pages 239
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In 1872, there were more than 300,000 slaves in Cuba and Puerto Rico. Though the Spanish government had passed a law for gradual abolition in 1870, slaveowners, particularly in Cuba, clung tenaciously to their slaves as unfree labor was at the core of the colonial economies. Nonetheless, people throughout the Spanish empire fought to abolish slavery, including the Antillean and Spanish liberals and republicans who founded the Spanish Abolitionist Society in 1865. This book is an extensive study of the origins of the Abolitionist Society and its role in the destruction of Cuban and Puerto Rican slavery and the reshaping of colonial politics.