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The Archaeology of Ancient Arizona

The Archaeology of Ancient Arizona Author Jefferson Reid
ISBN-10 9780816534944
Release 2016-10-01
Pages 312
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Carved from cliffs and canyons, buried in desert rock and sand are pieces of the ancient past that beckon thousands of visitors every year to the American Southwest. Whether Montezuma Castle or a chunk of pottery, these traces of prehistory also bring archaeologists from all over the world, and their work gives us fresh insight and information on an almost day-to-day basis. Who hasn't dreamed of boarding a time machine for a trip into the past? This book invites us to step into a Hohokam village with its sounds of barking dogs, children's laughter, and the ever-present grinding of mano on metate to produce the daily bread. Here, too, readers will marvel at the skills of Clovis elephant hunters and touch the lives of other ancestral people known as Mogollon, Anasazi, Sinagua, and Salado. Descriptions of long-ago people are balanced with tales about the archaeologists who have devoted their lives to learning more about "those who came before." Trekking through the desert with the famed Emil Haury, readers will stumble upon Ventana Cave, his "answer to a prayer." With amateur archaeologist Richard Wetherill, they will sense the peril of crossing the flooded San Juan River on the way to Chaco Canyon. Others profiled in the book are A. V. Kidder, Andrew Ellicott Douglass, Julian Hayden, Harold S. Gladwin, and many more names synonymous with the continuing saga of southwestern archaeology. This book is an open invitation to general readers to join in solving the great archaeological puzzles of this part of the world. Moreover, it is the only up-to-date summary of a field advancing so rapidly that much of the material is new even to professional archaeologists. Lively and fast paced, the book will appeal to anyone who finds magic in a broken bowl or pueblo wall touched by human hands hundreds of years ago. For all readers, these pages offer a sense of adventure, that "you are there" stir of excitement that comes only with making new discoveries about the distant past.



Grasshopper Pueblo

Grasshopper Pueblo Author J. Jefferson Reid
ISBN-10 9780816519149
Release 1999
Pages 186
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"Now two archaeologists who have devoted more than two decades to investigations at Grasshopper reconstruct the life and times of this fourteenth-century Mogollon community. Written for general readers - and for the White Mountain Apache, on whose land Grasshopper Pueblo is located and who have participated in the excavations there - the book conveys the simple joys and typical problems of an ancient way of life as inferred from its material remains."--BOOK JACKET. "Grasshopper Pueblo not only thoroughly reconstructs this past life at a mountain village, it also offers readers an appreciation of life at the field school and an understanding of how excavations have proceeded there through the years."--BOOK JACKET.



Connected Communities

Connected Communities Author Matthew A. Peeples
ISBN-10 9780816535682
Release 2018-02-20
Pages 291
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The Cibola region on the Arizona–New Mexico border has fascinated archaeologists for more than a century. The region’s core is recognized as the ancestral homeland of the contemporary Zuni people, and the area also spans boundaries between the Ancestral Puebloan and Mogollon culture areas. The complexity of cross-cutting regional and cultural designations makes this an ideal context within which to explore the relationship between identity and social change at broad regional scales. In Connected Communities, Matthew A. Peeples examines a period of dramatic social and political transformation in the ancient Cibola region (ca. A.D. 1150–1325). He analyzes archaeological data generated during a century of research through the lens of new and original social theories and methods focused on exploring identity, social networks, and social transformation. In so doing, he demonstrates the value of comparative, synthetic analysis. The book addresses some of the oldest enduring questions in archaeology: How do large-scale social identities form? How do they change? How can we study such processes using material remains? Peeples approaches these questions using a new set of methods and models from the broader comparative social sciences (relational sociology and social networks) to track the trajectories of social groups in terms of both networks of interactions (relations) and expressions of similarity or difference (categories). He argues that archaeological research has too often conflated these different kinds of social identity and that this has hindered efforts to understand the drivers of social change. In his strikingly original approach, Peeples combines massive amounts of new data and comparative explorations of contemporary social movements to provide new insights into how social identities formed and changed during this key period.



The Archaeology of Art in the American Southwest

The Archaeology of Art in the American Southwest Author Marit K. Munson
ISBN-10 0759120250
Release 2011-04-16
Pages 216
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Archaeologists seldom study ancient art, even though art is fundamental to the human experience. The Archaeology of Art in the American Southwest argues that archaeologists should study ancient artifacts as artwork, as applying the term 'art' to the past raises new questions about artists, audiences, and the works of art themselves. Munson proposes that studies of ancient artwork be based on standard archaeological approaches to material culture, framed by theoretical insights of disciplines such as art history, visual studies, and psychology. Using examples drawn from the American Southwest, The Archaeology of Art in the American Southwest discusses artistic practice in ancestral Pueblo and Mimbres ceramics and the implications of context and accessibility for the audiences of painted murals and rock art. Studies of Hohokam figurines and rock art illustrate methods for studying ancient images, while the aesthetics of ancient art are suggested by work on ceramics and kivas from Chaco Canyon. This book will be of interest to archaeologists working in the Southwest who want to broaden their perspective on the past. It will also appeal to archaeologists in other parts of the world and to anthropologists, art historians, and those who are intrigued by the material world, aesthetics, and the visual.



Beyond the Texts

Beyond the Texts Author William G. Dever
ISBN-10 9780884142171
Release 2017-11-03
Pages 772
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A handbook for biblical scholars and historians of the Ancient Near East William G. Dever offers a welcome perspective on ancient Israel and Judah that prioritizes the archaeological remains to render history as it was—not as the biblical writers argue it should have been. Drawing from the most recent archaeological data as interpreted from a nontheological point of view and supplementing that data with biblical material only when it converges with the archaeological record, Dever analyzes all the evidence at hand to provide a new history of ancient Israel and Judah that is accessible to all interested readers. Features A new approach to the history of ancient Israel Extensive bibliography More than eighty maps and illustrations



Ancient Ruins of the Southwest

Ancient Ruins of the Southwest Author David Grant Noble
ISBN-10 0873585305
Release 1991
Pages 218
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No region of this continent and few areas in the world can boast a collection of archaeological ruins equal to that of the American Southwest. An indispensable guide to over 50 sites throughout the region, this title includes 90 photos and 18 maps and diagrams.



Ten Thousand Years of Inequality

Ten Thousand Years of Inequality Author Timothy A. Kohler
ISBN-10 9780816537747
Release 2018-04-17
Pages 352
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"Field-defining research that will set the standard for understanding inequality in archaeological contexts"--Provided by publisher.



People of the mesa

People of the mesa Author Shirley Powell
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105038326133
Release 1987
Pages 175
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Black Mesa, Arizona, has sheltered human beings for over 8000 years. For two decades, with the support and assistance of the Peabody Coal Company, archaeologists and other scientists have sought an understanding of how and why those ancient peoples lived as they did. Powell and Gumerman, the principal researchers of one of the largest and longest-running projects in the history of North American archaeology, recognize that only parts of past cultures survive to be discovered and analyzed, but they stress that the material items archaeologists do recover can tell us a great deal about the nonmaterial aspects of the culture in which they were used. In four cultural historical chapters Powell and Gumerman focus in turn on each of the major occupations of Black Mesa: the Archaic (6000 B.C.), Basketmaker II (ca. the time of Christ), Puebloan (A.D. 800–1150), and the Navajo (A.D. 1825 to the present). The 125 photographs, 41 line drawings by Thomas W. Gatlin, and 20 pages of full-color illustrations communicate the fascination of archaeological discovery and add an extra dimension to the authors’ stories of ancient and modern life on Black Mesa.



In Search of the Old Ones

In Search of the Old Ones Author David Roberts
ISBN-10 1439127239
Release 2010-05-11
Pages 272
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An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.



Byron Cummings

Byron Cummings Author Todd W. Bostwick
ISBN-10 0816524777
Release 2006-01-01
Pages 350
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Byron Cummings, known to students and colleagues as ÒThe Dean,Ó had a profound influence on the archaeology of Arizona and Utah during its early development. An explorer, archaeologist, anthropologist, teacher, museum director, university administrator, and state parks commissioner, Cummings was involved in many important discoveries in the American Southwest over the first half of the twentieth century and was a pioneer in the education of generations of archaeologists and anthropologists. This book presents the first comprehensive examination of CummingsÕ life, offering readers a greater understanding of his trailblazing work. Todd Bostwick elucidates CummingsÕ many intellectual and cultural contributions, investigates the controversies in which he was embroiled, and describes his battles to wrest control of Arizona archaeology from eastern institutions that had long dominated Southwest archaeology. Cummings saw the Southwest as an American wilderness where the story of cultural development revealed by the archaeologist and anthropologist was as important as it was in Europe. BostwickÕs meticulous account of his life reflects his great reverence for the region and pays tribute to a man whose dedication, mentoring, and friendship have forever sealed his place as The Dean.



The Ancient Southwest

The Ancient Southwest Author Gregory McNamee
ISBN-10 1933855886
Release 2015-02-01
Pages 88
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The Ancient Southwest has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The Ancient Southwest also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The Ancient Southwest book for free.



Ancient Puebloan Southwest

Ancient Puebloan Southwest Author John Kantner
ISBN-10 0521788803
Release 2004-11-11
Pages 324
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Ancient Puebloan Southwest traces the evolution of Puebloan society in the American Southwest from the emergence of the Chaco and Mimbres traditions in the AD 1000s through the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the sixteenth century. The 2004 book focuses on the social and political changes that shaped Puebloan people over the centuries, emphasizing how factors internal to society impacted on cultural evolution, even in the face of the challenging environment that characterizes the American Southwest. The underlying argument is that while the physical environment both provides opportunities and sets limitations to social and political change, even more important evolutionary forces are the tensions between co-operation and competition for status and leadership. Although relying primarily on archaeological data, the book also includes oral histories, historical accounts, and ethnographic records as it introduces readers to the deep history of the Puebloan Southwest.



Rubbish

Rubbish Author William L. Rathje
ISBN-10 0816521433
Release 2001
Pages 263
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It is from the discards of former civilizations that archaeologists have reconstructed most of what we know about the past, and it is through their examination of today's garbage that William Rathje and Cullen Murphy inform us of our present. Rubbish! is their witty and erudite investigation into all aspects of the phenomenon of garbage. Rathje and Murphy show what the study of garbage tells us about a population's demographics and buying habits. Along the way, they dispel the common myths about our "garbage crisis"—about fast-food packaging and disposable diapers, about biodegradable garbage and the acceleration of the average family's garbage output. They also suggest methods for dealing with the garbage we do have.



The Lost World of the Old Ones Discoveries in the Ancient Southwest

The Lost World of the Old Ones  Discoveries in the Ancient Southwest Author David Roberts
ISBN-10 9780393241891
Release 2015-04-13
Pages 352
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An award-winning author and veteran mountain climber takes us deep into the Southwest backcountry to uncover secrets of its ancient inhabitants. For more than 5,000 years the Ancestral Puebloans—Native Americans who flourished long before the first contact with Europeans—occupied the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. Just before AD 1300, they abandoned their homeland in a migration that remains one of prehistory's greatest puzzles. Northern and southern neighbors of the Ancestral Puebloans, the Fremont and Mogollon likewise flourished for millennia before migrating or disappearing. Fortunately, the Old Ones, as some of their present-day descendants call them, left behind awe-inspiring ruins, dazzling rock art, and sophisticated artifacts ranging from painted pots to woven baskets. Some of their sites and relics had been seen by no one during the 700 years before David Roberts and his companions rediscovered them. In The Lost World of the Old Ones, Roberts continues the hunt for answers begun in his classic book, In Search of the Old Ones. His new findings paint a different, fuller portrait of these enigmatic ancients—thanks to the breakthroughs of recent archaeologists. Roberts also recounts his last twenty years of far-flung exploits in the backcountry with the verve of a seasoned travel writer. His adventures range across Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado, illuminating the mysteries of the Old Ones as well as of the more recent Navajo and Comanche. Roberts calls on his climbing and exploratory expertise to reach remote sanctuaries of the ancients hidden within nearly vertical cliffs, many of which are unknown to archaeologists and park rangers. This ongoing quest combines the shock of new discovery with a deeply felt connection to the landscape, and it will change the way readers experience, and imagine, the American Southwest.



Archaeology of the Southwest

Archaeology of the Southwest Author Linda S. Cordell
ISBN-10 1598746758
Release 2012
Pages 367
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The long awaited third edition of this well-known textbook continues to be the go-to text and reference for anyone interested in Southwestern archaeology, including the latest in current research, debates, and topical syntheses as well as increased coverage of Paleoindian and Archaic periods and the Casas Grandes phenomenon.



Ancient Hohokam Communities in Southern Arizona

Ancient Hohokam Communities in Southern Arizona Author Allen Dart
ISBN-10 1886398054
Release 1990-01-01
Pages 134
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Ancient Hohokam Communities in Southern Arizona has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Ancient Hohokam Communities in Southern Arizona also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Ancient Hohokam Communities in Southern Arizona book for free.



A History of the Ancient Southwest

A History of the Ancient Southwest Author Stephen H. Lekson
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105124167052
Release 2009
Pages 439
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According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."