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The Bakke case

The Bakke case Author Howard Ball
ISBN-10 UOM:39015050255614
Release 2000
Pages 231
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The Bakke case has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The Bakke case also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The Bakke case book for free.



Regents of the University of California V Bakke

Regents of the University of California V  Bakke Author Tim McNeese
ISBN-10 9781438103419
Release 2009-01-01
Pages 152
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Regents of the University of California v. Bakke familiarizes students with the landmark Supreme Court case that addressed the issue of affirmative action. In 1973 and 1974, Allan Bakke, a white male, was denied admission to the medical school at the University of California in Davis, despite being well qualified. Bakke filed suit, claiming racial discrimination. In a closely divided 1978 decision, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of programs giving advantage to minorities, but denied quota systems in college admissions. They ruled the UC medical school had, by maintaining a 16-percent minority quota, discriminated against Bakke. Allan Bakke was later admitted to the school, and graduated in 1992. Here, Professor Tim McNeese, who is also a consulting historian for the History Channel's Risk Takers, History Makers series, explains affirmative action and the background behind this lawsuit, as well as the controversy caused by the Court's decision.



Realizing Bakke s Legacy

Realizing Bakke s Legacy Author Patricia Mar¡n (Ph. D.)
ISBN-10 9781579222680
Release 2008
Pages 266
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* How has Bakke shaped our understanding of race, access to education, and affirmative action? * Will Bakke remain relevant for the future, legally and politically? * Can we use Bakke to re-envision affirmative action in higher education? Published to mark the 30th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Bakke decision, this book explores the complex set of legal and educational policy circumstances established by this historic court decision that continues to simultaneously frame, narrow, and confound our understanding of affirmative action in higher education specifically, and issues of equity in education broadly. By "upholding Bakke," the Supreme Court, in its Gratz and Grutter opinions, maintained its centrality in the on-going argument about access to higher education. However, this validation of racial and ethnic diversity as a legally compelling interest did not silence the multiplicity of voices debating the consequences and fundamental issues of Bakke. Multi-disciplinary in approach and multi-racial in content, this book represents that kaleidoscope of voices and opinions. The contributors include scholars of national stature in the areas of access and equity in education. The book is guided by three frames: Bakke's legal and philosophical lineage; the educational pipeline -- past, present, and future; and policy and practice. It begins with an historical analysis of the legal and policy parameters of the decision and highlights the legal and social fissures that exist related to affirmative action and college admissions. It discusses in detail the philosophical underpinnings of affirmative action as a catalyst for reaping the benefits of diversity. The book also reviews Bakke's broader influences on K-12 and postsecondary politics, and practices across institutional, state, and national levels. As racial divisions in the country are sharpening and as educational outcomes continue to be directly related to race and poverty, this volume will help inform the discussions and decisions by federal and state policy-makers, educational providers, civil rights advocates and other interested stakeholders to bring about the changes that lead to equal opportunity.



The Bakke Case

The Bakke Case Author Rebecca Stefoff
ISBN-10 076141939X
Release 2006
Pages 143
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"Describes the historical context of the case, University of California Regents v. Bakke, and details the claims made by both sides as well as the outcome, including excerpts from the Supreme Court justices decisions"--Provided by publisher.



Affirmative Action

Affirmative Action Author A. M. Babkina
ISBN-10 1590335708
Release 2004
Pages 128
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Affirmative Action is one of the most controversial issues of our times. Proponents on both sides of the issue claim clear-cut evidence for the rightness of their arguments, yet evidence is hazy at best. This new guide to the literature presents hundreds descriptions of books, reports and articles dealing with all aspects of affirmative action including: race relations; economic aspects, reverse discrimination; preferences; affirmative action programs; public opinion; court decisions; education, and many more. Complete title, author and subject indexes are provided.



Sex Race and Merit

Sex  Race  and Merit Author Faye J. Crosby
ISBN-10 0472067346
Release 2000
Pages 338
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Traces the history of this divisive national issue, as reflected in the writings of key opinion makers and in public documents



Historic U S Court Cases

Historic U S  Court Cases Author John W. Johnson
ISBN-10 0415937566
Release 2001-01-01
Pages 1089
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This collection of essays looks at over 200 major court cases, at both state and federal levels, from the colonial period to the present. Organized thematically, the articles range from 1,000 to 5,000 words and include recent topics such as the Microsoft antitrust case, the O.J. Simpson trials, and the Clinton impeachment. This new edition includes 43 new essays as well as updates throughout, with end-of-essay bibliographies and indexes by case and subject/name.



When Affirmative Action was White

When Affirmative Action was White Author Ira Katznelson
ISBN-10 0393052133
Release 2005
Pages 238
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In this "penetrating new analysis" () Ira Katznelson fundamentally recasts our understanding of twentieth-century American history and demonstrates that all the key programs passed during the New Deal and Fair Deal era of the 1930s and 1940s were created in a deeply discriminatory manner. Through mechanisms designed by Southern Democrats that specifically excluded maids and farm workers, the gap between blacks and whites actually widened despite postwar prosperity. In the words of noted historian Eric Foner, "Katznelson's incisive book should change the terms of debate about affirmative action, and about the last seventy years of American history."



Understanding Affirmative Action

Understanding Affirmative Action Author J. Edward Kellough
ISBN-10 1589010892
Release 2006
Pages 191
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For some time, the United States has been engaged in a national debate over affirmative action policy. A policy that began with the idea of creating a level playing field for minorities has sparked controversy in the workplace, in higher education, and elsewhere. After forty years, the debate still continues and the issues are as complex as ever. While most Americans are familiar with the term, they may not fully understand what affirmative action is and why it has become such a divisive issue. With this concise and up-to-date introduction, J. Edward Kellough brings together historical, philosophical, and legal analyses to fully inform participants and observers of this debate. Aiming to promote a more thorough knowledge of the issues involved, this book covers the history, legal status, controversies, and impact of affirmative action in both the private and public sectors -- and in education as well as employment. In addition, Kellough shows how the development and implementation of affirmative action policies have been significantly influenced by the nature and operation of our political institutions. Highlighting key landmarks in legislation and court decisions, he explains such concepts as "disparate impact," "diversity management," "strict scrutiny," and "representative bureaucracy." Understanding Affirmative Action probes the rationale for affirmative action, the different arguments against it, and the known impact it has had. Kellough concludes with a consideration of whether or not affirmative action will remain a useful tool for combating discrimination in the years to come. Not just for students in public administration and public policy, this handy volume will be a valuable resource for public administrators, human resource managers, and ordinary citizens looking for a balanced treatment of a controversial policy.



The Law of Affirmative Action

The Law of Affirmative Action Author Girardeau A. Spann
ISBN-10 9780814783931
Release 2000-02-01
Pages 328
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The debate over race in this country has of late converged on the contentious issue of affirmative action. Although the Supreme Court once supported the concept of racial affirmative action, in recent years a majority of the Court has consistently opposed various affirmative action programs. The Law of Affirmative Action provides a comprehensive chronicle of the evolution of the Supreme Court's involvement with the racial affirmative action issue over the last quarter century. Starting with the 1974 DeFunis v. Odegaard decision and the 1978 Bakke decision, which marked the beginnings of the Court's entanglement with affirmative action, Girardeau Spann examines every major Supreme Court affirmative action decision, showing how the controversy the Court initially left unresolved in DeFunis has persisted through the Court's 1998-99 term. Including nearly thirty principal cases, covering equal protection, voting rights, Title VII, and education, The Law of Affirmative Action is the only work to treat the Court decisions on racial affirmative action so closely, tracing the votes of each justice who has participated in the decisions. Indispensable for students and scholars, this timely volume elucidates reasons for the 180 degree turn in opinion on an issue so central to the debate on race in America today.



Affirmative Action and Racial Preference

Affirmative Action and Racial Preference Author Carl Cohen
ISBN-10 0195148940
Release 2003
Pages 394
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James P. Sterba counters that, far from being banned by the Constitution and the civil rights acts, affirmative action is actually mandated by law in the pursuit of a society that is racially and sexually just. The same Congress that adopted the 14[superscript th] Amendment, he notes, passed race-specific laws that extended aid to blacks.



How We Do Harm

How We Do Harm Author Otis Webb Brawley, MD
ISBN-10 9781429941501
Release 2012-01-31
Pages 320
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How We Do Harm exposes the underbelly of healthcare today—the overtreatment of the rich, the under treatment of the poor, the financial conflicts of interest that determine the care that physicians' provide, insurance companies that don't demand the best (or even the least expensive) care, and pharmaceutical companies concerned with selling drugs, regardless of whether they improve health or do harm. Dr. Otis Brawley is the chief medical and scientific officer of The American Cancer Society, an oncologist with a dazzling clinical, research, and policy career. How We Do Harm pulls back the curtain on how medicine is really practiced in America. Brawley tells of doctors who select treatment based on payment they will receive, rather than on demonstrated scientific results; hospitals and pharmaceutical companies that seek out patients to treat even if they are not actually ill (but as long as their insurance will pay); a public primed to swallow the latest pill, no matter the cost; and rising healthcare costs for unnecessary—and often unproven—treatments that we all pay for. Brawley calls for rational healthcare, healthcare drawn from results-based, scientifically justifiable treatments, and not just the peddling of hot new drugs. Brawley's personal history – from a childhood in the gang-ridden streets of black Detroit, to the green hallways of Grady Memorial Hospital, the largest public hospital in the U.S., to the boardrooms of The American Cancer Society—results in a passionate view of medicine and the politics of illness in America - and a deep understanding of healthcare today. How We Do Harm is his well-reasoned manifesto for change.



Encyclopedia of Law and Higher Education

Encyclopedia of Law and Higher Education Author Charles J. Russo
ISBN-10 9781412981118
Release 2010
Pages 557
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In light of the significance that education law occupies in the professional lives of educators, it is only natural that it plays a major role in educational leadership programs devoted to preparing leaders for both the world of higher education and K-12 schools. The centrality of education law is reflected in a study conducted on behalf of the University Council for Educational Administration revealing that education law is the second-most commonly taught subject in educational leadership programs. Further, with many universities offering a variety of courses on education law at all levels, it continues to occupy a crucial element in the curricula for educators. Despite its importance, there is a surprising dearth of readily accessible reference materials for academicians and practitioners. Thus, the Encyclopedia of Law and Higher Education fills a gap that will be of use to those in the world of higher education, whether students, faculty members, administrators, or attorneys.



The Supreme Court in a Separation of Powers System

The Supreme Court in a Separation of Powers System Author Richard Pacelle
ISBN-10 9781136657795
Release 2015-01-09
Pages 328
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The U.S. Supreme Court is not a unitary actor and it does not function in a vacuum. It is part of an integrated political system in which its decisions and doctrine must be viewed in a broader context. In some areas, the Court is the lead policy maker. In other areas, the Court fills in the gaps of policy created in the legislative and executive branches. In either instance, the Supreme Court’s work is influenced by and in turn influences all three branches of the federal government as well as the interests and opinions of the American people. Pacelle analyzes the Court’s interaction in the separation of powers system, detailing its relationship to the presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, public opinion, interest groups, and the vast system of lower courts. The niche the Court occupies and the role it plays in American government reflect aspects of both the legal and political models. The Court has legal duties and obligations as well as some freedom to exercise its collective political will. Too often those studying the Court have examined it in isolation, but this book urges scholars and students alike to think more broadly and situate the highest court as the "balance wheel" in the American system.



The Retreat from Race

The Retreat from Race Author Dana Y. Takagi
ISBN-10 0813519144
Release 1992
Pages 246
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"By examining the debate over Asian-American admissions at such universities as Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton, Takagi explains important developments in the politics of race. Her central argument is that the controversial admissions policies facilitate a subtle but important shift away from racial and toward class preferences in affirmative action procedures. This complex and sensitive subject is carefully analyzed, and will help readers understand the intricacies of university policy and the politics of admissions." --Library Journal



Naked Racial Preference

Naked Racial Preference Author Carl Cohen
ISBN-10 9781461704218
Release 1995-09-12
Pages 240
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From landmark court cases on affirmative action to their consequences, a study on why such preferences are morally wrong, unlawful, and indefensible.



For Discrimination

For Discrimination Author Randall Kennedy
ISBN-10 9780307907387
Release 2013-09-03
Pages 304
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In the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent decision regarding Fisher v. University of Texas, For Discrimination is at once the definitive reckoning with one of America’s most explosively contentious and divisive issues and a principled work of advocacy for clearly defined justice. What precisely is affirmative action, and why is it fiercely championed by some and just as fiercely denounced by others? Does it signify a boon or a stigma? Or is it simply reverse discrimination? What are its benefits and costs to American society? What are the exact indicia determining who should or should not be accorded affirmative action? When should affirmative action end, if it must? Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School professor and author of such critically acclaimed and provocative books as Race, Crime, and the Law and the national best-seller Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word, gives us a concise, gimlet-eyed, and deeply personal conspectus of the policy, refusing to shy away from the myriad complexities of an issue that continues to bedevil American race relations. With pellucid reasoning, Kennedy accounts for the slipperiness of the term “affirmative action” as it has been appropriated by ideologues of every stripe; delves into the complex and surprising legal history of the policy; coolly analyzes key arguments pro and con advanced by the left and right, including the so-called color-blind, race-neutral challenge; critiques the impact of Supreme Court decisions on higher education; and ponders the future of affirmative action.