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The Cigar Factory

The Cigar Factory Author Michele Moore
ISBN-10 9781611175912
Release 2016-02-09
Pages 296
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“The sun leaned for down bringing shade to the waterfront,” begins Michele Moore’s entrancing debut novel, harkening back to an era when the legendary fishermen of Charleston’s Mosquito Fleet rowed miles offshore for their daily catch. With evocative dialect and remarkable prose, The Cigar Factory tells the story of two entwined families, both devout Catholics—the white McGonegals and the African American Ravenels—in the storied port city of Charleston, South Carolina, during the World Wars. Moore’s novel follows the parallel lives of family matriarchs working on segregated floors of the massive Charleston cigar factory, where white and black workers remain divided and misinformed about the duties and treatment received by each other. Cassie McGonegal and herniece Brigid work upstairs in the factory rolling cigars by hand. Meliah Amey Ravenel works in the basement, where she stems the tobacco. While both white and black workers suffer in the harsh working conditions of the factory and both endure the sexual harassment of the foremen, segregation keeps them from recognizing their common plight until the Tobacco Workers Strike of 1945. Through the experience of a brutal picket line, the two women come to realize how much they stand to gain by joining forces, creating a powerful moment in labor history that gives rise to the Civil Rights anthem, “We Shall Overcome.” Moore’s extensive historical research included interviews with her own family members who worked at the cigar factory, adding a layer of nuance and authenticity to her empowering story of families and friendships forged through struggle, loss, and redemption. The Cigar Factory includes a foreword by New York Times best-selling author and Story River Books editor at large Pat Conroy.



Untying the Moon

Untying the Moon Author Ellen Malphrus
ISBN-10 9781611176117
Release 2015-10-20
Pages 200
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Bailey Martin is in perpetual motion—a child of the South Carolina lowcountry tides, being pulled to and from a reckoning with destiny. A marine biologist by training and an artist by dedication and talent, Bailey is a woman of contradictions, at once a free-spirited adventurer giving deeply of herself to environmental causes and familial loyalties but also consumed by primal, isolating appetites and dangerous attractions. Restless and troubled, Bailey chafes at her existence, becoming uneasy in her success, her life, and her own skin. Untying the Moon, the debut novel from southern storyteller Ellen Malphrus, is a vibrant tale of self-discovery, approaching the realms of myth and lore as readers ride shotgun with Bailey in Blue Ruby, her ’67 Skylark convertible, from Manhattan down the eastern seaboard, from coastal Carolina to the Alaskan wilderness and back again, all in search of the embrace of love and—finally—of home. When Bailey trades the freedom of the road for a relationship with Padgett Turner, a Vietnam veteran haunted by his past, she finds the compelling possibility of settling into one place and one relationship. But the weight of Padgett’s emotional scars is too much for either to bear, even together. As Padgett’s darkness escalates, a moment of horrific violence pulls Bailey homeward to the Jericho River of Kirk’s Bluff, South Carolina—a river of dolphins, dreams, and portents. In her lifelong friendship with neighbor Ben Simmons and under the sheltering gaze of her fisherman father, Cecil, and Ben’s parents, George and Retta, Bailey uncovers the healing connections she had been seeking elsewhere and earns her chance at the truest prize of all—a balance between her dedication to her inner life and responsibilities to the outer world. Recalling the writings of James Dickey, Jack Kerouac, Jack London, Pat Conroy, Mary Alice Monroe, and Lee Smith, Untying the Moon explores the redemptive powers of home, nature, creation, and storytelling itself. With prose that ebbs and flows from the lyrical and lush to the staccato and sparse, Malphrus’s novel is rich with classical allusions and regional folklore, the enrapturing beauty of its settings, a racially and geographically diverse charismatic cast, and all the mystery and magic of fate. New York Times best-selling writer and Story River Books editor at large Pat Conroy provides a foreword to the novel.



Beyond the Fields

Beyond the Fields Author Barbara Doyle
ISBN-10 0615207235
Release 2008
Pages 80
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Located in Charleston along the Ashley River, Middleton Place is an eighteenth-century plantation that has survived revolution, Civil War, and earthquake to become a well-preserved museum and a National Historic Landmark. This book presents a window into the lives of slaves on a representative South Carolina plantation.



Upheaval in Charleston

Upheaval in Charleston Author Susan Millar Williams
ISBN-10 9780820339580
Release 2011-06-01
Pages 384
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On August 31, 1886, a massive earthquake centered near Charleston, South Carolina, sent shock waves as far north as Maine, down into Florida, and west to the Mississippi River. When the dust settled, residents of the old port city were devastated by the death and destruction. Upheaval in Charlestonis a gripping account of natural disaster and turbulent social change in a city known as the cradle of secession. Weaving together the emotionally charged stories of Confederate veterans and former slaves, Susan Millar Williams and Stephen G. Hoffius portray a South where whites and blacks struggled to determine how they would coexist a generation after the end of the Civil War. This is also the story of Francis Warrington Dawson, a British expatriate drawn to the South by the romance of the Confederacy. As editor of Charleston’sNews and Courier, Dawson walked a lonely and dangerous path, risking his life and reputation to find common ground between the races. Hailed as a hero in the aftermath of the earthquake, Dawson was denounced by white supremacists and murdered less than three years after the disaster. His killer was acquitted after a sensational trial that unmasked a Charleston underworld of decadence and corruption. Combining careful research with suspenseful storytelling,Upheaval in Charlestonoffers a vivid portrait of a volatile time and an anguished place.



Six Miles to Charleston

Six Miles to Charleston Author Bruce Orr
ISBN-10 9781614232810
Release 2010-12-03
Pages 128
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In 1819, a young man outwitted death at the hands of John and Lavinia Fisher and sparked the hunt for Charleston's most notorious serial killers. Former homicide investigator Bruce Orr follows the story of the Fishers, from the initial police raid on their Six Mile Inn with its reportedly grisly cellar to the murderous couple's incarceration and execution at the squalid Old City Jail. Yet there still may be more sinister deeds left unpunished, an overzealous sheriff, corrupt officials and documents only recently discovered all suggest that there is more to the tale. Orr uncovers the mysteries and debunks the myths behind the infamous legend of the nation's first convicted female serial killer.



A History of Charleston s Hampton Park

A History of Charleston s Hampton Park Author Kevin R. Eberle
ISBN-10 9781614236597
Release 2012-08-21
Pages 128
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Most visitors to Charleston never venture far enough north to discover what residents claim as the most appealing public open space on the peninsula. Hampton Park is completely unexpected in this city famous for highly manicured gardens with clipped lawns, sculpted shrubs and precise designs hidden behind massive walls and iron gates. Hampton Park's naturalistic character was created as an antidote to the cramped conditions of the lower peninsula, and it still offers open fields of grass, walking trails, shade trees and overflowing flower beds. But the story is not that simple--it began more than three hundred years ago with Native Americans and involves early plantation life, Revolutionary War battles, horse racing, the Civil War, industrial development, civic spectacle, professional baseball, a zoo and disco.



The Indigo Girl

The Indigo Girl Author Natasha Boyd
ISBN-10 9781455137176
Release 2017-10-03
Pages 352
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“Natasha’s writing is a fresh and modern spin on great Southern literature.” - Ashley Pullo, author of the New Amsterdam series, praise for the author “A delight to read…Thank you, Natasha, for giving Eliza the recognition she deserves.” - Margaret F. Pickett, author of Eliza Lucas Pinckney: Colonial Plantation Manager and Mother of American Patriots, 1722–1793 In 1739, Eliza Lucas is sixteen years old when her father leaves her in charge of their family’s three plantations in South Carolina, then proceeds to bleed the estates dry in pursuit of his military ambitions. Her mother wants nothing more than for their South Carolina endeavor to fail so they can go back to England. Her family is in danger of losing everything. Hearing how much the French pay for indigo dye, Eliza believes it’s their salvation. But thwarted at every turn, even by her family, Eliza finds her only allies in an aging horticulturalist, a lawyer, and a slave with whom she strikes a dangerous deal: teach her the intricate, thousand-year-old secret process of making indigo dye, and in return—against the laws of the day—she will teach the slaves to read. So develops an incredible story of romance, intrigue, hidden friendships, threats, ambition, betrayal, and sacrifice, based on historical documents and Eliza Lucas’ own letters.



John Henry Rutledge

John Henry Rutledge Author Nancy Rhyne
ISBN-10 087844131X
Release 1997
Pages 101
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Sue Alston tells of life at Hampton Plantation, of shopping on King Street, of wild boar hunts in the river delta, of Charleston horse races, and of John Henry Rutledge who took his own life and was buried by the back steps but whose spirit never left the house.



Charleston A Good Life

Charleston  A Good Life Author Ned Brown
ISBN-10 9781628728422
Release 2017-10-03
Pages 216
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Inspired by the legendary work of Slim Aarons, a photographic narrative tour of a beautiful, unique, historical city and the remarkable people who live there. Author Ned Brown kicks off the Good Life series with the story about what makes Charleston, South Carolina so desirable to its residents and the five million visitors who seek it out each year. This stunning coffee- table book features photographs by Gately Williams, whose work is regularly featured in Garden & Gun, Coastal Living, and other publications. With his signature ease, Brown profiles more than fifty “interesting Charlestonians, doing interesting things in a beautiful place.” Charleston: A Good Life highlights native Charlestonians and those who have made the southern Holy City their home during the past two decades. Some are wealthy, many not, but all enjoy the richness of a place that has been voted the best small city in the world by Travel + Leisure magazine.



The Education of Dixie Dupree

The Education of Dixie Dupree Author Donna Everhart
ISBN-10 9781496705525
Release 2016-10-25
Pages 352
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In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabama is home, a place of pine-scented breezes and hot, languid afternoons. Though Dixie is learning that the family she once believed was happy has deep fractures, even her vivid imagination couldn’t concoct the events about to unfold. Dixie records everything in her diary—her parents’ fights, her father’s drinking and his unexplained departure, and the arrival of Uncle Ray. Only when Dixie desperately needs help and is met with disbelief does she realize how much damage her past lies have done. But she has courage and a spirit that may yet prevail, forcing secrets into the open and allowing her to forgive and become whole again. Narrated by her young heroine in a voice as sure and resonant as The Secret Life of Bees’ Lily or Bastard Out of Carolina’s Bone, Donna Everhart’s remarkable debut is a story about mothers and daughters, the guilt and pain that pass between generations, and the truths that are impossible to hide, especially from ourselves.



Kismetwali and Other Stories

Kismetwali and Other Stories Author Reetika Khanna Nijhawan
ISBN-10 9789385031724
Release 2015-06-01
Pages 327
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Details for Kismetwali and Other Stories Set against the backdrop of modern-day India, Kismetwali and Other Stories places the reader amidst circumstances that transcend place, purse and prestige. This octet of novellas offers a rare glimpse into the parallel lives of the privileged and penniless, converging on those astonishing moments when free will intercepts fate and the rigid divide between social classes is rendered insignificant. Each narrative showcases walas and walis of the working class—the common yet essential purveyors of goods and providers of service—as empowered individuals who take centre stage.The shavewala, a humble barber, becomes an intimate collaborator in a love story that spans the seven seas; the malishwali, a long-serving masseuse, conceals her mistress’s shocking secret while offering a gift of revelation to another; the kismetwali, a clairvoyant of unremarkable pedigree, solicits cosmic benefaction for her affluent clients. These socially eclipsed characters are the true protagonists in every story. About Reetika Khanna Nijhawan Reetika Khanna Nijhawan was born and raised in a small town in northern India. While growing up, she travelled the world extensively with her father, an officer in the merchant navy. After receiving her degree in Psychology from Delhi University, she worked as a flight attendant with Lufthansa German Airlines before settling down to write for ELLE and ELLE Décor in Mumbai. She later moved to Atlanta, where her work has been published in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Khabar magazine. Kismetwali and Other Stories is her first work of fiction. She penned these eight novellas over time, while waiting in the carpool line outside her daughter’s school.



The Ghost Apple

The Ghost Apple Author Aaron Thier
ISBN-10 9781620405291
Release 2014-03-04
Pages 288
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At the turn of the eighteenth century, John Morehead Tripoli is marooned on the unspoiled Caribbean island of St. Renard. There, he lives for an idyllic year in a community of Carawak Indians. Three hundred years later, the Carawak are gone, St. Renard is carpeted with banana plantations and sugarcane fields, and Tripoli himself is remembered only through his grandson, founder of New Hampshire's Tripoli College, which maintains a branch campus on the island. The college, never prosperous, has been forced to enter into a coercive financial relationship with snack food giant Big Anna® Brands, the same corporation that controls most of the land on St. Renard. Big Anna® deposes the college president, uses students and faculty as test subjects for a "dietary and mood additive" called Malpraxalin®, and hijacks the St. Renard campus for a "field studies" program. At the heart of this twisted satire are two souls in transition. Bill Brees is a grandfatherly dean, "undercover" as a Tripoli freshman, and bemused by how things have changed since his undergrad days. Maggie Bell is an African-American student, startled into the realization that nothing really changes at all. When these unlikely friends both elect to spend their spring semesters in the Caribbean, they will see a side of Big Anna® even uglier than they could have imagined. The Ghost Apple develops through a varied and colorful collection of documents, including tourism pamphlets, blog posts, slave narratives, and personal correspondence. Slowly these texts reveal the extent of Tripoli's current crisis, and highlight those historical crises in the midst of which the college--and the nation--were founded.



Fever at Dawn

Fever at Dawn Author Péter Gárdos
ISBN-10 9780544770331
Release 2016-04-12
Pages 240
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“Fever at Dawn has the sweetness of The Rosie Project and the pathos of The Fault in Our Stars . . . A book to fall in love with.” — Herald Sun It’s 1945 and Miklós is looking for a wife. The fact that he has six months left to live doesn’t discourage him — he isn’t one to let small problems like that stand in the way, especially not after he’s survived a concentration camp. Currently marooned in an all-male sanatorium in Sweden, and desperate to get out, he acquires the names of the 117 Hungarian women also recovering in Sweden and writes each of them a letter in his beautiful cursive hand. Luckily for him, Lili decides to write back. Drawn from the real-life letters of Péter Gárdos’s parents, and reminiscent of the film Life Is Beautiful,Fever at Dawn is a vibrant, ribald, and unforgettable tale, showing the death-defying power of the human will to live and to love. “At once heartrending and lighthearted, this romance covers enormous ground in love and war, joy and tragedy.” — Shelf Awareness, starred review “A riveting and high-spirited journey from the brink of death toward life, [Fever at Dawn] asserts the power of love.” — Julie Orringer, author of The Invisible Bridge



Oblivion

Oblivion Author Sergei Lebedev
ISBN-10 9781939931290
Release 2016-01-18
Pages 292
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"Opening in stately fashion and unfolding ever faster with fierce, intensive elegance, this first novel discloses the weight of Soviet history and its consequences. ... Highly recommended for anyone serious about literature or history."—Library Journal (Starred review) "Packs a wicked emotional punch through fierce poetic imagery ... Lebedev takes his place beside Solzhenitsyn and other great writers who have refused to abide by silence ... Courageous and devastating."—Kirkus Reviews (Starred review) "An important book about where Russia is today, with poetic descriptions and unforgettable images evoking that nation's often elusive attempts to understand its dark past. I stand in awe of both the author and translator."—Jack F. Matlock, Jr, former US Ambassador to the Soviet Union "The subject matter of Oblivion is the eerie frozen landscape scattered with the human detritus of an inhuman bygone era. What brings it back from oblivion is the author’s exceptional power of language. A haunting read."—Michael Zantovsky, former press secretary to Czech President Vaclav Havel, author of Havel: A Life and former Czech Ambassador to the United States, Israel and Britain “Beautifully written, haunting and unputdownable. A masterpiece novel which relates the horrors of Russia's unburied Soviet past through the eyes of a man revisiting—and filling in the gaps in—his half-understood childhood.” —Edward Lucas, senior editor, The Economist and author of The New Cold War: Putin's Russia and the Threat to the West "Sergei Lebedev's debut novel is a haunting tale about the loss of national memory and its moral consequences for the individual. The brilliant translation by Antonina W. Bouis captures the evocative beauty of the poetic first-person narration and renders it into memorable English."—Solomon Volkov, author of Shostakovich and Stalin, St. Petersburg: A Cultural History, and The Magical Chorus: A History of Russian Culture from Tolstoy to Solzhenitsyn "An extraordinary book that takes readers across Russia's desolate northern landscape and turns up secrets about the terrible legacy of the Soviet gulags, described through evocative, often poetic portraits of people and places."—Celestine Bohlen, International New York Times columnist and former Moscow correspondent for The New York Times "A monomaniacal meditation on memory and forgetting, presence and emptiness ... Lebedev's magnificent novel has the potency to become a mirror and wake-up call to a Russia that is blind to history."—Neue Zürcher Zeitung "Sergei Lebedev opens up new territory in literature. Lebedev's prose lives from the precise images and the author's colossal gift of observation."—Der Spiegel "The beauty of the language is almost impossible to bear."—Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung In one of the first twenty-first century Russian novels to probe the legacy of the Soviet prison camp system, a young man travels to the vast wastelands of the Far North to uncover the truth about a shadowy neighbor who saved his life, and whom he knows only as Grandfather II. What he finds, among the forgotten mines and decrepit barracks of former gulags, is a world relegated to oblivion, where it is easier to ignore both the victims and the executioners than to come to terms with a terrible past. This disturbing tale evokes the great and ruined beauty of a land where man and machine worked in tandem with nature to destroy millions of lives during the Soviet century. Emerging from today's Russia, where the ills of the past are being forcefully erased from public memory, this masterful novel represents an epic literary attempt to rescue history from the brink of oblivion. Sergei Lebedev was born in Moscow in 1981 and worked for seven years on geological expeditions in northern Russia and Central Asia. His first novel, Oblivion, has been translated into many languages.



Cajun Waltz

Cajun Waltz Author Robert H. Patton
ISBN-10 9781250089007
Release 2016-06-14
Pages 272
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The lyrics of a Cajun waltz may be dark as midnight with heartache and trouble, but still the music swings. The same goes for what happens after a shifty musician and a lonely shopgirl let destiny sweep them into an ill-suited marriage in swampy southwest Louisiana on the eve of the Depression. Love doesn’t much figure between Richie Bainard and Esther Block. They build a business together while dreaming opposite dreams of fulfillment. But like a gumbo simmering with peppers and spice, desires finally come to a boil. Three generations of the volatile clan grapple with the region’s economic struggles and racial tensions. The Bainard children, twins Bonnie and R.J. and their half-brother, Seth, pursue separate cravings for money, sex, and religion. The chase in each case runs off the rails thanks to an ex-marine with a soft heart and a brutish devotion, a dazzling young stepmother of mixed race and mixed motives, and a high school tart who proves tougher and truer than all of them. Ultimately it takes the mass devastation of Hurricane Audrey in 1957 to cleanse the reckless passions. The aftermath is painful but pure, like an old blues song that puts tears in your eyes while you dance.



Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Eliza Lucas Pinckney Author Margaret F. Pickett
ISBN-10 9781476625287
Release 2016-07-07
Pages 224
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In 1739, Major George Lucas moved from Antigua to Charleston, South Carolina, with his wife and two daughters. Soon after their arrival, England declared war on Spain and he was recalled to Antigua to join his regiment. His wife in poor health, he left his daughter Eliza, 17, in charge of his three plantations. Following his instructions, she began experimenting with plants at the family estate on Wappoo Creek. She succeeded in growing indigo and producing a rich, blue dye from the leaves, thus bringing a profitable new cash crop to Carolina planters. While her accomplishments were rare for a young lady of the 18th century, they were not outside the scope of what was expected of a woman at that time. This biography, drawn from her surviving letters and other sources, chronicles Eliza Pinckney's life and explores the 18th century world she inhabited.



Cardinal Hill

Cardinal Hill Author Mary Anna Bryan
ISBN-10 0881465739
Release 2016-08-01
Pages 304
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Margaret Norman lives in a family with secrets, not the least of which is her own. Her family will not talk about her mother, an artist who died shortly after Margaret was born. Her father, a brooding attorney, is too obsessed with his own pain to share. Louisa, her older sister, is hostile toward Margaret and ignores her. Black housekeeper, Ida, who is helping to raise Margaret, does not think it her place to tell what others will not. When close friend Lily May suggests there may be stuff bout your momma folks oughtnt to know, Margaret rejects the notion. Finally, Ida shares what she knows, and Margaret must face painful truths concerning her mother. Set in the South during the 1930s and 1940s, this story takes place in a world where blacks and whites, although separated by custom and law, often thrive in personal relationships; where half a world away, a war disrupts lives of those close to home; and where little girls suspect that kissing causes babies.