Download or read online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.

The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960

The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960 Author David G. Gutiérrez
ISBN-10 9780231508414
Release 2004-10-06
Pages 512
Download Link Click Here

Latinos are now the largest so-called minority group in the United States -- the result of a growth trend that began in the mid-twentieth century -- and the influence of Latin cultures on American life is reflected in everything from politics to education to mass cultural forms such as music and television. Yet very few volumes have attempted to analyze or provide a context for this dramatic historical development. The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960 is among the few comprehensive histories of Latinos in America. This collaborative, interdisciplinary volume provides not only cutting-edge interpretations of recent Latino history, including essays on the six major immigrant groups (Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Central Americans, and South Americans), but also insight into the major areas of contention and debate that characterize Latino scholarship in the early twenty-first century. This much-needed book offers a broad overview of this era of explosive demographic and cultural change by exploring the recent histories of all the major national and regional Latino subpopulations and reflecting on what these historical trends might mean for the future of both the United States and the other increasingly connected nations of the Western Hemisphere. While at one point it may have been considered feasible to explore the histories of national populations in isolation from one another, all of the contributors to this volume highlight the deep transnational ties and interconnections that bind different peoples across national and regional lines. Thus, each chapter on Latino national subpopulations explores the ambiguous and shifting boundaries that so loosely define them both in the United States and in their countries of origin. A multinational perspective on important political and cultural themes -- such as Latino gender systems, religion, politics, expressive and artistic cultures, and interactions with the law -- helps shape a realistic interpretation of the Latino experience in the United States.



Latinas os in the United States

Latinas os in the United States Author Havidan Rodriguez
ISBN-10 9780387719436
Release 2007-11-21
Pages 392
Download Link Click Here

The Latina/o population in the United States has become the largest minority group in the nation. Latinas/os are a mosaic of people, representing different nationalities and religions as well as different levels of education and income. This edited volume uses a multidisciplinary approach to document how Latinas and Latinos have changed and continue to change the face of America. It also includes critical methodological and theoretical information related to the study of the Latino/a population in the United States.



Ethnic Labels Latino Lives

Ethnic Labels  Latino Lives Author Suzanne Oboler
ISBN-10 0816622868
Release 1995
Pages 226
Download Link Click Here

Though we have witnessed in recent years the fading of the idealized image of U.S. society as a melting pot, we have also realized that the possibility of recasting it in multicultural terms is problematic. Oboler discusses the historical process of labeling groups of individuals, illustrating how labels affect the meaning of citizenship and the struggle for full social participation in the United States. Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives aims to understand the role ethnic labels play in our society and brings us closer toward actualizing a society that values cultural diversity.



Hispanics in the United States

Hispanics in the United States Author Laird W. Bergad
ISBN-10 9780521718103
Release 2010-08-09
Pages 444
Download Link Click Here

This book examines the transformations in the demographic, social, and economic structures of Latino-Americans in the United States between 1980 and 2005.



Between Two Worlds

Between Two Worlds Author David Gregory Gutiérrez
ISBN-10 0842024743
Release 1996
Pages 271
Download Link Click Here

This work explores the controversial issues surrounding the influx of Mexicans to America. Drawing on insights provoked by recent trends in immigration research, these 11 essays offer an overview of some of the more important interpretations of the dimensions of the Mexican diaspora.



Transforming Citizenship

Transforming Citizenship Author Raymond A. Rocco
ISBN-10 9781628950014
Release 2014-07-01
Pages 278
Download Link Click Here

In Transforming Citizenship Raymond Rocco studies the “exclusionary inclusion” of Latinos based on racialization and how the processes behind this have shaped their marginalized citizenship status, offering a framework for explaining this dynamic. Contesting this status has been at the core of Latino politics for more than 150 years. Pursuing the goal of full, equal, and just inclusion in societal membership has long been a major part of the struggle to realize democratic normative principles. This illuminating research demonstrates the inherent limitations of the citizenship regime in the United States for incorporating Latinos as full societal members and offers an alternative conception, “associative citizenship,” that provides a way to account for and challenge the pattern of exclusionary belonging that has defined the positions of the Latinos in U.S. society. Through a critical engagement with key theorists such as Rawls, Habermas, Kymlicka, Walzer, Taylor, and Young, Rocco advances an original analysis of the politics of Latino societal membership and citizenship, arguing that the specific processes of racialization that have played a determinative role in creating and maintaining the pattern of social and political exclusions of Latinos have not been addressed by the dominant theories of diversity and citizenship developed in the prevalent literature in political theory.



Latino Politics

Latino Politics Author Lisa Garcia Bedolla
ISBN-10 9780745686424
Release 2015-05-19
Pages 240
Download Link Click Here

Fully revised and updated, the second edition of this popular text provides students with a comprehensive introduction to Latino participation in US politics. Focusing on six Latino groups - Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, Salvadorans, and Guatemalans - the book explores the migration history of each group and shows how that experience has been affected by US foreign policy and economic interests in each country of origin. The political status of Latinos on arrival in the United States, including their civil rights, employment opportunities, and political incorporation, is then examined. Finally, the analysis follows each group’s history of collective mobilization and political activity, drawing out the varied ways they have engaged in the US political system. Using the tension between individual agency and structural constraints as its central organizing theme, the discussion situates Latino migrants, and their children, within larger macro economic and geo-political structures that influence their decisions to migrate and their ability to adapt socially, economically, and politically to their new country. It also demonstrates how Latinos continually have shown that through political action they can significantly improve their channels of opportunity. Thus, the book encourages students to think critically about what it means to be a racialized minority group within a majoritarian US political system, and how that position structures Latinos’ ability to achieve their social, economic, and political goals.



Reform Without Justice

Reform Without Justice Author Alfonso Gonzales
ISBN-10 9780190203269
Release 2013-11-20
Pages 240
Download Link Click Here

Placed within the context of the past decade's war on terror and emergent Latino migrant movement, Reform without Justice addresses the issue of state violence against migrants in the United States. It questions what forces are driving draconian migration control policies and why it is that, despite its success in mobilizing millions, the Latino migrant movement and its allies have not been able to more successfully defend the rights of migrants. Gonzales argues that the contemporary Latino migrant movement and its allies face a dynamic form of political power that he terms "anti-migrant hegemony". This type of political power is exerted in multiple sites of power from Congress, to think tanks, talk shows and local government institutions, through which a rhetorically race neutral and common sense public policy discourse is deployed to criminalize migrants. Most insidiously anti-migrant hegemony allows for large sectors of "pro-immigrant" groups to concede to coercive immigration enforcement measures such as a militarized border wall and the expansion of immigration policing in local communities in exchange for so-called Comprehensive Immigration Reform. Given this reality, Gonzales sustains that most efforts to advance immigration reform will fail to provide justice for migrants. This is because proposed reform measures ignore the neoliberal policies driving migration and reinforce the structures of state violence used against migrants to the detriment of democracy for all. Reform without Justice concludes by discussing how Latino migrant activists - especially youth - and their allies can change this reality and help democratize the United States.



Dangerous Curves

Dangerous Curves Author Isabel Molina-Guzman
ISBN-10 9780814796061
Release 2010-02-01
Pages 272
Download Link Click Here

With images of Jennifer Lopez’s butt and America Ferrera’s smile saturating national and global culture, Latina bodies have become an ubiquitous presence. Dangerous Curves traces the visibility of the Latina body in the media and popular culture by analyzing a broad range of popular media including news, media gossip, movies, television news, and online audience discussions. Isabel Molina-Guzmán maps the ways in which the Latina body is gendered, sexualized, and racialized within the United States media using a series of fascinating case studies. The book examines tabloid headlines about Jennifer Lopez’s indomitable sexuality, the contested authenticity of Salma Hayek’s portrayal of Frida Kahlo in the movie Frida, and America Ferrera’s universally appealing yet racially sublimated Ugly Betty character. Dangerous Curves carves out a mediated terrain where these racially ambiguous but ethnically marked feminine bodies sell everything from haute couture to tabloids. Through a careful examination of the cultural tensions embedded in the visibility of Latina bodies in United States media culture, Molina-Guzmán paints a nuanced portrait of the media’s role in shaping public knowledge about Latina identity and Latinidad, and the ways political and social forces shape media representations.



One Out of Three

One Out of Three Author Nancy Foner
ISBN-10 9780231535137
Release 2013-05-14
Pages 312
Download Link Click Here

In this absorbing anthology, in-depth portraits of diverse ethnic populations, including the Chinese, Dominicans, Jamaicans, Koreans, Liberians, Mexicans, and Jews from the former Soviet Union reveal surprising new realities of immigrant life in twenty-first-century New York City. Contributors show how fifty years of massive inflows have transformed New York City’s economic and cultural life and how the city has changed the lives of immigrant newcomers. Nancy Foner’s introduction describes how New York is special as a gateway to America, and a demographic overview chapter details the remarkable mélange of ethnic and racial groups now present in the city and fueling its population growth. Essays discuss both the large numbers of undocumented Mexicans living in legal limbo and the new, flourishing community organizations offering them opportunities for advancement. They recount the experiences of Liberians fleeing a war torn country and creating a vibrant neighborhood on Staten Island’s North Shore. Other developments considered include the growth of Korean-owned businesses and Russian émigrés increased representation in Brooklyn politics. Contributors relate these achievements, along with ongoing social and cultural challenges, through engaging, human portraits, and a concluding chapter discusses the prospects of second generation immigrants as they make their way in New York City.



Latinos Unidos

Latinos Unidos Author Enrique T. Trueba
ISBN-10 0847687295
Release 1999
Pages 173
Download Link Click Here

Latinos Unidos presents an unexpected perspective on Latinos_not only as a highly diverse and rapidly growing population in the United States with distinct social, cultural, and economic features_but as a new political force with a cohesive collective ethnic identity. Indeed, Latinos in this country constitute a new political power coming to grips with their global significance. Within two decades, Latino children will constitute a majority in urban public schools around the country. By the mid-21st century, Latinos (along with African-Americans) will represent half the U.S. population. While much of the literature in the social sciences continues to stereotype Latinos as marginalized, poor, and low-achievers, unable to 'assimilate' and function in mainstream society, Latinos are quietly taking important positions in academic, government, professional organizations, and the international world of economics. Their rapid flow into the U.S. has, to an extent, camouflaged this upward social, educational, and class mobility. Trueba, using his unique vantage point as a Latino immigrant and scholar, explores the vital issues of personal identity and resiliency, adaptive strategies, and successes of Latinos in North America in this pathbreaking book. Among the most fascinating and least known subjects he discusses are binational networks, which describe the bilingual and bicultural capabilities of a new generation of Latinos who can function on both sides of the border with Mexico. Most of all, readers will come away from Latinos Unidos with the growing significance of Latinos in the U.S. and their vital role in shaping the future.



A History of the Cuban Revolution

A History of the Cuban Revolution Author Aviva Chomsky
ISBN-10 9781118942291
Release 2015-02-02
Pages 248
Download Link Click Here

A fully-revised and updated new edition of a concise and insightful socio-historical analysis of the Cuban revolution, and the course it took over five and a half decades. Now available in a fully-revised second edition, including new material to add to the book’s coverage of Cuba over the past decade under Raul Castro All of the existing chapters have been updated to reflect recent scholarship Balances social and historical insight into the revolution with economic and political analysis extending into the twenty-first century Juxtaposes U.S. and Cuban perspectives on the historical impact of the revolution, engaging and debunking the myths and preconceptions surrounding one of the most formative political events of the twentieth century Incorporates more student-friendly features such as a timeline and glossary



Classroom Wars

Classroom Wars Author Natalia Mehlman Petrzela
ISBN-10 9780199358472
Release 2015-03-03
Pages 304
Download Link Click Here

The schoolhouse has long been a crucible in the construction and contestation of the political concept of "family values." Through Spanish-bilingual and sex education, moderates and conservatives in California came to define the family as a politicized and racialized site in the late 1960s and 1970s. Sex education became a vital arena in the culture wars as cultural conservatives imagined the family as imperiled by morally lax progressives and liberals who advocated for these programs attempted to manage the onslaught of sexual explicitness in broader culture. Many moderates, however, doubted the propriety of addressing such sensitive issues outside the home. Bilingual education, meanwhile, was condemned as a symbol of wasteful federal spending on ethically questionable curricula and an intrusion on local prerogative. Spanish-language bilingual-bicultural programs may seem less relevant to the politics of family, but many Latino parents and students attempted to assert their authority, against great resistance, in impassioned demands to incorporate their cultural and linguistic heritage into the classroom. Both types of educational programs, in their successful implementation and in the reaction they inspired, highlight the rightward turn and enduring progressivism in postwar American political culture. In Classroom Wars, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela charts how a state and a citizenry deeply committed to public education as an engine of civic and moral education navigated the massive changes brought about by the 1960s, including the sexual revolution, school desegregation, and a dramatic increase in Latino immigration. She traces the mounting tensions over educational progressivism, cultural and moral decay, and fiscal improvidence, using sources ranging from policy documents to student newspapers, from course evaluations to oral histories. Petrzela reveals how a growing number of Americans fused values about family, personal, and civic morality, which galvanized a powerful politics that engaged many Californians and, ultimately, many Americans. In doing so, they blurred the distinction between public and private and inspired some of the fiercest classroom wars in American history. Taking readers from the cultures of Orange County mega-churches to Berkeley coffeehouses, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela's history of these classroom controversies sheds light on the bitterness of the battles over diversity we continue to wage today and their influence on schools and society nationwide.



Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Society

Encyclopedia of Race  Ethnicity  and Society Author Richard T. Schaefer
ISBN-10 9781412926942
Release 2008-03-20
Pages 1622
Download Link Click Here

This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area



Consuming Mexican Labor

Consuming Mexican Labor Author Ronald L. Mize
ISBN-10 9781442601574
Release 2010
Pages 294
Download Link Click Here

Mexican migration to the United States and Canada is a highly contentious issue in the eyes of many North Americans, and every generation seems to construct the northward flow of labor as a brand new social problem. The history of Mexican labor migration to the United States, from the Bracero Program (1942-1964) to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), suggests that Mexicans have been actively encouraged to migrate northward when labor markets are in short supply, only to be turned back during economic downturns. In this timely book, Mize and Swords dissect the social relations that define how corporations, consumers, and states involve Mexican immigrant laborers in the politics of production and consumption. The result is a comprehensive and contemporary look at the increasingly important role that Mexican immigrants play in the North American economy.



Handbook of the Economics of International Migration

Handbook of the Economics of International Migration Author Barry Chiswick
ISBN-10 9780444633880
Release 2014-12-08
Pages 1702
Download Link Click Here

The economic literature on international migration interests policymakers as well as academics throughout the social sciences. These volumes, the first of a new subseries in the Handbooks in Economics, describe and analyze scholarship created since the inception of serious attention began in the late 1970s. This literature appears in the general economics journals, in various field journals in economics (especially, but not exclusively, those covering labor market and human resource issues), in interdisciplinary immigration journals, and in papers by economists published in journals associated with history, sociology, political science, demography, and linguistics, among others. Covers a range of topics from labor market outcomes and fiscal consequences to the effects of international migration on the level and distribution of income – and everything in between. Encompasses a wide range of topics related to migration and is multidisciplinary in some aspects, which is crucial on the topic of migration Appeals to a large community of scholars interested in this topic and for whom no overviews or summaries exist



Walls and Mirrors

Walls and Mirrors Author David G. Gutiérrez
ISBN-10 9780520202191
Release 1995-03-27
Pages 320
Download Link Click Here

Covering more than one hundred years of American history, Walls and Mirrors examines the ways that continuous immigration from Mexico transformed—and continues to shape—the political, social, and cultural life of the American Southwest. Taking a fresh approach to one of the most divisive political issues of our time, David Gutiérrez explores the ways that nearly a century of steady immigration from Mexico has shaped ethnic politics in California and Texas, the two largest U.S. border states. Drawing on an extensive body of primary and secondary sources, Gutiérrez focuses on the complex ways that their pattern of immigration influenced Mexican Americans' sense of social and cultural identity—and, as a consequence, their politics. He challenges the most cherished American myths about U.S. immigration policy, pointing out that, contrary to rhetoric about "alien invasions," U.S. government and regional business interests have actively recruited Mexican and other foreign workers for over a century, thus helping to establish and perpetuate the flow of immigrants into the United States. In addition, Gutiérrez offers a new interpretation of the debate over assimilation and multiculturalism in American society. Rejecting the notion of the melting pot, he explores the ways that ethnic Mexicans have resisted assimilation and fought to create a cultural space for themselves in distinctive ethnic communities throughout the southwestern United States.