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The Culture of Migration in Southern Mexico

The Culture of Migration in Southern Mexico Author Jeffrey H. Cohen
ISBN-10 9780292782587
Release 2009-06-03
Pages 208
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Migration is a way of life for many individuals and even families in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Some who leave their rural communities go only as far as the state capital, while others migrate to other parts of Mexico and to the United States. Most send money back to their communities, and many return to their homes after a few years. Migration offers Oaxacans economic opportunities that are not always available locally—but it also creates burdens for those who stay behind. This book explores the complex constellation of factors that cause rural Oaxacans to migrate, the historical and contemporary patterns of their migration, the effects of migration on families and communities, and the economic, cultural, and social reasons why many Oaxacans choose not to migrate. Jeffrey Cohen draws on fieldwork and survey data from twelve communities in the central valleys of Oaxaca to give an encompassing view of the factors that drive migration and determine its outcomes. He demonstrates conclusively that, while migration is an effective way to make a living, no single model can explain the patterns of migration in southern Mexico.



Culture Migration and Sport

Culture  Migration  and Sport Author Bernardo Ramirez Rios
ISBN-10 OCLC:811844830
Release 2012
Pages 171
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Abstract: My dissertation focuses on the relationship of sport and community building. In Los Angeles, CA and Oaxaca, Mexico the cultural practice of basketball is a productive social tool that is used to enhance community relationships. This research starts with individual identity (micro) and the cultural motivations that relate to communities in Los Angeles and Oaxaca. I begin with an individual perspective to discuss the impact of prime cultural motivations on larger social processes (transnational, migration, globalization, etc). I used traditional anthropological methods (ethnography, participant observation, visual data collection) to examine the sport of Oaxacan basketball in Los Angeles and Oaxaca. Through an iterative process data was collected from 2007-2011 to develop an ethnographic account of Oaxacan basketball in Los Angeles and Oaxaca. Results from the data show that basketball in Oaxaca is a rich cultural tradition that has a significant history that pre-dates the "modern" explosion of sport during the last 25 years. I will discuss ethnographic and visual data to support my conclusion that Oaxacan basketball is a cultural sport with transnational and global outcomes. This research contributes to theoretical models of migration, sport, and identity by focusing on cultural practices.



Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U S South

Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U S  South Author Mary E. Odem
ISBN-10 9780820332123
Release 2009
Pages 175
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The Latino population in the South has more than doubled over the past decade. The mass migration of Latin Americans to the U.S. South has led to profound changes in the social, economic, and cultural life of the region and inaugurated a new era in southern history. This multidisciplinary collection of essays, written by U.S. and Mexican scholars, explores these transformations in rural, urban, and suburban areas of the South. Using a range of different methodologies and approaches, the contributors present in-depth analyses of how immigration from Mexico and Central and South America is changing the South and how immigrants are adapting to the southern context. Among the book’s central themes are the social and economic impact of immigration, the resulting shifts in regional culture, new racial dynamics, immigrant incorporation and place-making, and diverse southern responses to Latino newcomers. Various chapters explore ethnic and racial tensions among poultry workers in rural Mississippi and forestry workers in Alabama; the “Mexicanization” of the urban landscape in Dalton, Georgia; the costs and benefits of Latino labor in North Carolina; the challenges of living in transnational families; immigrant religious practice and community building in metropolitan Atlanta; and the creation of Latino spaces in rural and urban South Carolina and Georgia.



Cultures of Migration

Cultures of Migration Author Jeffrey H. Cohen
ISBN-10 9780292726857
Release 2011-09-01
Pages 165
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Around the globe, people leave their homes to better themselves, to satisfy needs, and to care for their families. They also migrate to escape undesirable conditions, ranging from a lack of economic opportunities to violent conflicts at home or in the community. Most studies of migration have analyzed the topic at either the macro level of national and global economic and political forces, or the micro level of the psychology of individual migrants. Few studies have examined the "culture of migration"—that is, the cultural beliefs and social patterns that influence people to move. Cultures of Migration combines anthropological and geographical sensibilities, as well as sociological and economic models, to explore the household-level decision-making process that prompts migration. The authors draw their examples not only from their previous studies of Mexican Oaxacans and Turkish Kurds but also from migrants from Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and many parts of Asia. They examine social, economic, and political factors that can induce a household to decide to send members abroad, along with the cultural beliefs and traditions that can limit migration. The authors look at both transnational and internal migrations, and at shorter- and longer-term stays in the receiving location. They also consider the effect that migration has on those who remain behind. The authors' "culture of migration" model adds an important new dimension to our understanding of the cultural beliefs and social patterns associated with migration and will help specialists better respond to increasing human mobility.



The Politics Economics and Culture of Mexican US Migration

The Politics  Economics  and Culture of Mexican US Migration Author E. Ashbee
ISBN-10 9780230609914
Release 2007-12-25
Pages 323
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Images and accounts of the Mexican - US migration process and the border region abound. Representations of border crossers, plans for the construction of a security fence, the shifting economic relationship between the US and its southern neighbors, and the changing character of the Rio Grande area have played a pivotal role in shaping contemporary political discourse. The Politics, Economics, and Culture of Mexican-US Migration, which has attracted contributors from four different countries, offers multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary evaluations of these developments. It also considers the impact of migration in both the US and Mexico. Some of the contributions are case-studies, while others have a broad 'survey' character. All place the current debate about migration and the changing nature of the north American continent within its wider context in a way that is of relevance and interest to both the specialist and the more general reader.



New Destinations

New Destinations Author Victor Zuniga
ISBN-10 9781610445702
Release 2005-04-07
Pages 320
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Mexican immigration to the United States—the oldest and largest immigration movement to this country—is in the midst of a fundamental transformation. For decades, Mexican immigration was primarily a border phenomenon, confined to Southwestern states. But legal changes in the mid-1980s paved the way for Mexican migrants to settle in parts of America that had no previous exposure to people of Mexican heritage. In New Destinations, editors Víctor Zúñiga and Rubén Hernández-León bring together an inter-disciplinary team of scholars to examine demographic, social, cultural, and political changes in areas where the incorporation of Mexican migrants has deeply changed the preexisting ethnic landscape. New Destinations looks at several of the communities where Mexican migrants are beginning to settle, and documents how the latest arrivals are reshaping—and being reshaped by—these new areas of settlement. Contributors Jorge Durand, Douglas Massey, and Chiara Capoferro use census data to diagram the historical evolution of Mexican immigration to the United States, noting the demographic, economic, and legal factors that led recent immigrants to move to areas where few of their predecessors had settled. Looking at two towns in Southern Louisiana, contributors Katharine Donato, Melissa Stainback, and Carl Bankston III reach a surprising conclusion: that documented immigrant workers did a poorer job of integrating into the local culture than their undocumented peers. They attribute this counterintuitive finding to documentation policies, which helped intensify employer control over migrants and undercut the formation of a stable migrant community among documented workers. Brian Rich and Marta Miranda detail an ambivalent mixture of paternalism and xenophobia by local residents toward migrants in Lexington, Kentucky. The new arrivals were welcomed for their strong work ethic so long as they stayed in "invisible" spheres such as fieldwork, but were resented once they began to take part in more public activities like schools or town meetings. New Destinations also provides some hopeful examples of progress in community relations. Several chapters, including Mark Grey and Anne Woodrick's examination of a small Iowa town, point to the importance of dialogue and mediation in establishing amicable relations between ethnic groups in newly multi-cultural settings. New Destinations is the first scholarly assessment of Mexican migrants' experience in the Midwest, Northeast, and deep South—the latest settlement points for America's largest immigrant group. Enriched by perspectives from demographers, anthropologists, sociologists, folklorists, and political scientists, this volume is an essential starting point for scholarship on the new Mexican migration.



Steel Barrio

Steel Barrio Author Michael Innis-Jiménez
ISBN-10 9780814760154
Release 2013-06-17
Pages 256
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Since the early twentieth century, thousands of Mexican Americans have lived, worked, and formed communities in Chicago’s steel mill neighborhoods. Drawing on individual stories and oral histories, Michael Innis-Jiménez tells the story of a vibrant, active community that continues to play a central role in American politics and society. Examining how the fortunes of Mexicans in South Chicago were linked to the environment they helped to build, Steel Barrio offers new insights into how and why Mexican Americans created community. This book investigates the years between the World Wars, the period that witnessed the first, massive influx of Mexicans into Chicago. South Chicago Mexicans lived in a neighborhood whose literal and figurative boundaries were defined by steel mills, which dominated economic life for Mexican immigrants. Yet while the mills provided jobs for Mexican men, they were neither the center of community life nor the source of collective identity. Steel Barrio argues that the Mexican immigrant and Mexican American men and women who came to South Chicago created physical and imagined community not only to defend against the ever-present social, political, and economic harassment and discrimination, but to grow in a foreign, polluted environment. Steel Barrio reconstructs the everyday strategies the working-class Mexican American community adopted to survive in areas from labor to sports to activism. This book links a particular community in South Chicago to broader issues in twentieth-century U.S. history, including race and labor, urban immigration, and the segregation of cities.



Human Rights and Indigenous Workers the Mixtecs in Mexico and the United States

Human Rights and Indigenous Workers   the Mixtecs in Mexico and the United States Author Carole Nagengast
ISBN-10 UTEXAS:059173020656418
Release 1992
Pages 42
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Human Rights and Indigenous Workers the Mixtecs in Mexico and the United States has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Human Rights and Indigenous Workers the Mixtecs in Mexico and the United States also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Human Rights and Indigenous Workers the Mixtecs in Mexico and the United States book for free.



Cultures of Migration

Cultures of Migration Author Jeffrey H. Cohen
ISBN-10 9780292742468
Release 2011-09-01
Pages 179
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Around the globe, people leave their homes to better themselves, to satisfy needs, and to care for their families. They also migrate to escape undesirable conditions, ranging from a lack of economic opportunities to violent conflicts at home or in the community. Most studies of migration have analyzed the topic at either the macro level of national and global economic and political forces, or the micro level of the psychology of individual migrants. Few studies have examined the "culture of migration"—that is, the cultural beliefs and social patterns that influence people to move. Cultures of Migration combines anthropological and geographical sensibilities, as well as sociological and economic models, to explore the household-level decision-making process that prompts migration. The authors draw their examples not only from their previous studies of Mexican Oaxacans and Turkish Kurds but also from migrants from Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and many parts of Asia. They examine social, economic, and political factors that can induce a household to decide to send members abroad, along with the cultural beliefs and traditions that can limit migration. The authors look at both transnational and internal migrations, and at shorter- and longer-term stays in the receiving location. They also consider the effect that migration has on those who remain behind. The authors' "culture of migration" model adds an important new dimension to our understanding of the cultural beliefs and social patterns associated with migration and will help specialists better respond to increasing human mobility.



The Roots of Mexican Labor Migration

The Roots of Mexican Labor Migration Author Alexander Monto
ISBN-10 UOM:39015032943287
Release 1994-01-01
Pages 251
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Monto focuses on one Mexican town with high migrancy and on one of its migrants' main destinations, Salinas, California. He describes the network linking the two communities, which migrants use to maximize employment, minimize expenses, and return with the proceeds to Mexico, where they will be able to buy more. Monto finds that although macrosocial factors create the economic polarization that propels migration, the migrants are not merely pawns being pushed and pulled; instead, they use circulatory migration as one of several options selected according to their role in their domestic group and the group's particular needs. He concludes that this labor circulation is not a transitional phase bound to disappear when Mexico's workforce is converted to wage laborers, but a permanent, institutionalized component of Mexico's periphery-core relationship to the United States. In the next few years, predicts Monto, the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement, together with agricultural consolidation already underway in Mexico, will probably augment rather than reduce migration.



The Global Health Care Chain

The Global Health Care Chain Author John Connell
ISBN-10 9781135912819
Release 2008-12-17
Pages 214
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For more than a quarter of a century there has been significant international migration of skilled health workers, but in the last decades, with critical changes in both sending and receiving countries, few parts of the world are now unaffected by the consequences of the migration of health workers, either as sources, destinations or sometimes both. The book takes the understanding of health worker migration substantially beyond the more scattered and fragmented papers and anecdotes that largely existed before, into the first consolidated analysis. In doing so it reveals its exceptional significance for both sending and receiving countries (in economic, social and political terms), provides the only analysis of remittances of health workers, casts new light on gender, globalisation, transnational linkages, the trade in services (linked to GATS) and the overall relationship between migration and development, and reviews practical responses and solutions.



From South Texas to the Nation

From South Texas to the Nation Author John Weber
ISBN-10 9781469625249
Release 2015-08-25
Pages 336
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In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation. Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.



The Other Side of the Fence

The Other Side of the Fence Author Sheila Croucher
ISBN-10 9780292782389
Release 2010-01-01
Pages 270
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A growing number of Americans, many of them retirees, are migrating to Mexico's beach resorts, border towns, and picturesque heartland. While considerable attention has been paid to Mexicans who immigrate to the U.S., the reverse scenario receives little scrutiny. Shifting the traditional lens of North American migration, The Other Side of the Fence takes a fascinating look at a demographic trend that presents significant implications for the United States and Mexico. The first in-depth account of this trend, Sheila Croucher's study describes the cultural, economic, and political lives of these migrants of privilege. Focusing primarily on two towns, San Miguel de Allende in the mountains and Ajijic along the shores of Lake Chapala, Croucher depicts the surprising similarities between immigrant populations on both sides of the border. Few Americans living in Mexico are fluent in the language of their new land, and most continue to practice the culture and celebrate the national holidays of their homeland, maintaining close political, economic, and social ties to the United States while making political demands on Mexico, where they reside. Accessible, timely, and brimming with eye-opening, often ironic, findings, The Other Side of the Fence brings an important perspective to borderlands debates.



Decentralization and Rural Development in Mexico

Decentralization and Rural Development in Mexico Author Jonathan Fox
ISBN-10 1878367331
Release 1996
Pages 74
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Decentralization and Rural Development in Mexico has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Decentralization and Rural Development in Mexico also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Decentralization and Rural Development in Mexico book for free.



Social Inequality in Oaxaca

Social Inequality in Oaxaca Author Arthur D. Murphy
ISBN-10 087722868X
Release 1991
Pages 282
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Analyzes the urbanization of one area from its origins more than two thousand years ago. This book examines Oaxaca, Mexico, paying particular attention to neighborhoods, families and economic activities, and focuses on issues of poverty and inequality.



Homesickness

Homesickness Author Susan J. Matt
ISBN-10 9780199913251
Release 2011-09-08
Pages 360
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Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity, what children feel at summer camp, but in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of colonists, explorers, pioneers, soldiers, and immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. Using letters, diaries, memoirs, medical records, and psychological studies, this wide-ranging book uncovers the profound pain felt by Americans on the move from the country's founding until the present day. Susan Matt shows how colonists in Jamestown longed for and often returned to England, African Americans during the Great Migration yearned for their Southern homes, and immigrants nursed memories of Sicily and Guadalajara and, even after years in America, frequently traveled home. These iconic symbols of the undaunted, forward-looking American spirit were often homesick, hesitant, and reluctant voyagers. National ideology and modern psychology obscure this truth, portraying movement as easy, but in fact Americans had to learn how to leave home, learn to be individualists. Even today, in a global society that prizes movement and that condemns homesickness as a childish emotion, colleges counsel young adults and their families on how to manage the transition away from home, suburbanites pine for their old neighborhoods, and companies take seriously the emotional toll borne by relocated executives and road warriors. In the age of helicopter parents and boomerang kids, and the new social networks that sustain connections across the miles, Americans continue to assert the significance of home ties. By highlighting how Americans reacted to moving farther and farther from their roots, Homesickness: An American History revises long-held assumptions about home, mobility, and our national identity.



Women and Migration in the U S Mexico Borderlands

Women and Migration in the U S  Mexico Borderlands Author Denise A. Segura
ISBN-10 0822341182
Release 2007
Pages 595
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Seminal essays on how women adapt to the structural transformations caused by the large migration from Mexico to the U.S.A., how they create or contest representations of their identities in light of their marginality, and give voice to their own agency.