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The Firebrand and the First Lady

The Firebrand and the First Lady Author Patricia Bell-Scott
ISBN-10 9780679767299
Release 2017-01-24
Pages 480
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"In 1938, the twenty-eight-year-old Pauli Murray wrote a letter to the president and first lady, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, protesting racial segregation in the South. Eleanor wrote back. So began a friendship that would last for a quarter-century, as Pauli became a lawyer, a principal strategist in the fight to protect Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and a cofounder of the National Organization for Women, and Eleanor became a diplomat and first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. Two decades in the making, and drawing on letters, journals, diaries, and interviews, this monumental work shows how the relationship between a writer-turned-activist and the first lady not only had a profound effect on each of their lives, but also impacted the struggle for social justice."--Page 4 of cover.



The Firebrand and the First Lady

The Firebrand and the First Lady Author Patricia Bell-Scott
ISBN-10 9781101946923
Release 2016-02-02
Pages 480
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Longlisted for the National Book Award A groundbreaking book—two decades in the works—that tells the story of how a brilliant writer-turned-activist, granddaughter of a mulatto slave, and the first lady of the United States, whose ancestry gave her membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution, forged an enduring friendship that changed each of their lives and helped to alter the course of race and racism in America. Pauli Murray first saw Eleanor Roosevelt in 1933, at the height of the Depression, at a government-sponsored, two-hundred-acre camp for unemployed women where Murray was living, something the first lady had pushed her husband to set up in her effort to do what she could for working women and the poor. The first lady appeared one day unannounced, behind the wheel of her car, her secretary and a Secret Service agent her passengers. To Murray, then aged twenty-three, Roosevelt’s self-assurance was a symbol of women’s independence, a symbol that endured throughout Murray’s life. Five years later, Pauli Murray, a twenty-eight-year-old aspiring writer, wrote a letter to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt protesting racial segregation in the South. The president’s staff forwarded Murray’s letter to the federal Office of Education. The first lady wrote back. Murray’s letter was prompted by a speech the president had given at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, praising the school for its commitment to social progress. Pauli Murray had been denied admission to the Chapel Hill graduate school because of her race. She wrote in her letter of 1938: “Does it mean that Negro students in the South will be allowed to sit down with white students and study a problem which is fundamental and mutual to both groups? Does it mean that the University of North Carolina is ready to open its doors to Negro students . . . ? Or does it mean, that everything you said has no meaning for us as Negroes, that again we are to be set aside and passed over . . . ?” Eleanor Roosevelt wrote to Murray: “I have read the copy of the letter you sent me and I understand perfectly, but great changes come slowly . . . The South is changing, but don’t push too fast.” So began a friendship between Pauli Murray (poet, intellectual rebel, principal strategist in the fight to preserve Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, cofounder of the National Organization for Women, and the first African American female Episcopal priest) and Eleanor Roosevelt (first lady of the United States, later first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, and chair of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women) that would last for a quarter of a century. Drawing on letters, journals, diaries, published and unpublished manuscripts, and interviews, Patricia Bell-Scott gives us the first close-up portrait of this evolving friendship and how it was sustained over time, what each gave to the other, and how their friendship changed the cause of American social justice. From the Hardcover edition.



The Firebrand and the First Lady

The Firebrand and the First Lady Author Patricia Bell-Scott
ISBN-10 9780679446521
Release 2016
Pages 454
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This book tells the story of how a writer-turned-activist, granddaughter of a mulatto slave, and the first lady of the United States forged an enduring friendship that changed each of their lives and helped to alter the course of race and racism in America.



Jane Crow

Jane Crow Author Rosalind Rosenberg
ISBN-10 9780190656454
Release 2017-04-19
Pages 512
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"Euro-African-American activist Pauli Murray was a feminist lawyer who played pivotal roles in both the modern civil rights and women's movements, and later become the first woman ordained a priest by the Episcopal Church. Born in 1910 and identified as female, she believed from childhood that she was male. Jane Crow is her definitive biography, exploring how she engaged the arguments used to challenge race discrimination to battle gender discrimination in the 1960s and 70s. Before there was a social movement to support transgender identity, she mounted attacks on all arbitrary categories of distinction. In the 1950s, her legal scholarship helped Thurgood Marshall to shift his course and attack segregation frontally in Brown v. Board of Education. In the 1960s, Murray persuaded Betty Friedan to help her found an NAACP for women, which Friedan named NOW. Appointed by Eleanor Rossevelt to the President's Commission on the Status of Women in 1962, she advanced the idea of Jane Crow, arguing that the same reasons used to attack race discriminatio n could be used to battle gender discrimination. In the early 1970s, Murray provided Ruth Bader Ginsberg with the argument Ginsberg used to persuade the Supreme Court that the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution protects not only blacks but also women--and potentially other minority groups--from discrimination. helping to propel Ruth Bader Ginsberg to her first Supreme Court victory for women's rights and greatly expanding the idea of equality in the process. Murray accomplished all of this as someone who would today be identified as transgender but who, due to the limitations of her time, focused her attention on dismantling systematic injustices of all sorts, transforming the idea of what equality means"--



Pauli Murray

Pauli Murray Author Pauli Murray
ISBN-10 0870495968
Release 1987
Pages 451
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Pauli Murray has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Pauli Murray also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Pauli Murray book for free.



Song in a Weary Throat Memoir of an American Pilgrimage

Song in a Weary Throat  Memoir of an American Pilgrimage Author Pauli Murray
ISBN-10 9781631494598
Release 2018-05-08
Pages 544
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A prophetic memoir by the activist who “articulated the intellectual foundations” (The New Yorker) of the civil rights and women’s rights movements. First published posthumously in 1987, Pauli Murray’s Song in a Weary Throat was critically lauded, winning the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Lillian Smith Book Award among other distinctions. Yet Murray’s name and extraordinary influence receded from view in the intervening years; now they are once again entering the public discourse. At last, with the republication of this “beautifully crafted” memoir, Song in a Weary Throat takes its rightful place among the great civil rights autobiographies of the twentieth century. In a voice that is energetic, wry, and direct, Murray tells of a childhood dramatically altered by the sudden loss of her spirited, hard-working parents. Orphaned at age four, she was sent from Baltimore to segregated Durham, North Carolina, to live with her unflappable Aunt Pauline, who, while strict, was liberal-minded in accepting the tomboy Pauli as “my little boy-girl.” In fact, throughout her life, Murray would struggle with feelings of sexual “in-betweenness”—she tried unsuccessfully to get her doctors to give her testosterone—that today we would recognize as a transgendered identity. We then follow Murray north at the age of seventeen to New York City’s Hunter College, to her embrace of Gandhi’s Satyagraha—nonviolent resistance—and south again, where she experienced Jim Crow firsthand. An early Freedom Rider, she was arrested in 1940, fifteen years before Rosa Parks’ disobedience, for sitting in the whites-only section of a Virginia bus. Murray’s activism led to relationships with Thurgood Marshall and Eleanor Roosevelt—who respectfully referred to Murray as a “firebrand”—and propelled her to a Howard University law degree and a lifelong fight against "Jane Crow" sexism. We also read Betty Friedan’s enthusiastic response to Murray’s call for an NAACP for Women—the origins of NOW. Murray sets these thrilling high-water marks against the backdrop of uncertain finances, chronic fatigue, and tragic losses both private and public, as Patricia Bell-Scott’s engaging introduction brings to life. Now, more than thirty years after her death in 1985, Murray—poet, memoirist, lawyer, activist, and Episcopal priest—gains long-deserved recognition through a rediscovered memoir that serves as a “powerful witness” (Brittney Cooper) to a pivotal era in the American twentieth century.



Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware

Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware Author Anne Firor Scott
ISBN-10 9780807876732
Release 2009-09-15
Pages 216
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In 1942 Pauli Murray, a young black woman from North Carolina studying law at Howard University, visited a constitutional law class taught by Caroline Ware, one of the nation's leading historians. A friendship and a correspondence began, lasting until Murray's death in 1985. Ware, a Boston Brahmin born in 1899, was a scholar, a leading consumer advocate, and a political activist. Murray, born in 1910 and raised in North Carolina, with few resources except her intelligence and determination, graduated from college at 16 and made her way to law school, where she organized student sit-ins to protest segregation. She pulled her friend Ware into this early civil rights activism. Their forty-year correspondence ranged widely over issues of race, politics, international affairs, and--for a difficult period in the 1950s--McCarthyism. In time, Murray became a labor lawyer, a university professor, and the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. Ware continued her work as a social historian and consumer advocate while pursuing an international career as a community development specialist. Their letters, products of high intelligence and a gift for writing, offer revealing portraits of their authors as well as the workings of an unusual female friendship. They also provide a wonderful channel into the social and political thought of the times, particularly regarding civil rights and women's rights.



The Senator and the Sharecropper

The Senator and the Sharecropper Author Chris Myers Asch
ISBN-10 9780807872024
Release 2011-02-01
Pages 368
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In this fascinating study of race, politics, and economics in Mississippi, Chris Myers Asch tells the story of two extraordinary personalities--Fannie Lou Hamer and James O. Eastland--who represented deeply opposed sides of the civil rights movement. Both



The Gilded Years

The Gilded Years Author Karin Tanabe
ISBN-10 9781501110467
Release 2016-06-07
Pages 400
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SOON TO BE ADAPTED FOR FILM in A White Lie, a major motion picture, starring and produced by Zendaya in collaboration with Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine. “Tanabe immerses the reader in a world of romance and manners, but also leaves you gripping the edge of your seat…An elegant and extremely gratifying imagining of one remarkable woman's life.” —USA TODAY “Think: 'Gatsby' meets college meets an impressive beach read.” —theSkimm An Us Weekly “Sizzling Summer Read” * A Time Magazine Summer Read Since childhood, Anita Hemmings has longed to attend the country’s most exclusive school for women, Vassar College. Now, a bright, beautiful senior in the class of 1897, she is hiding a secret that would have banned her from admission: Anita is the only African-American student ever to attend Vassar. With her olive complexion and dark hair, this daughter of a janitor and descendant of slaves has successfully passed as white, but now finds herself rooming with Louise “Lottie” Taylor, the scion of one of New York’s most prominent families. Though Anita has kept herself at a distance from her classmates, Lottie’s sphere of influence is inescapable, her energy irresistible, and the two become fast friends. Pulled into her elite world, Anita learns what it’s like to be treated as a wealthy, educated white woman—the person everyone believes her to be—and even finds herself in a heady romance with a moneyed Harvard student. It’s only when Lottie becomes infatuated with Anita’s brother, Frederick, whose skin is almost as light as his sister’s, that the situation becomes particularly perilous. And as Anita’s college graduation looms, those closest to her will be the ones to dangerously threaten her secret. Set against the vibrant backdrop of the Gilded Age, an era when old money traditions collided with modern ideas, Tanabe has written an unputdownable and emotionally compelling story of hope, sacrifice, and betrayal—and a gripping account of how one woman dared to risk everything for the chance at a better life.



Life Notes

Life Notes Author Patricia Bell-Scott
ISBN-10 0393312062
Release 1995-01
Pages 429
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Presents the personal testimonies of contemporary Black women who illuminate the complexities of their lives, offering reflections on family, work, intimacy, politics, violation, and recovery



Eleanor and Hick

Eleanor and Hick Author Susan Quinn
ISBN-10 9781101607022
Release 2016-09-27
Pages 416
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A warm, intimate account of the love between Eleanor Roosevelt and reporter Lorena Hickok—a relationship that, over more than three decades, transformed both women's lives and empowered them to play significant roles in one of the most tumultuous periods in American history In 1932, as her husband assumed the presidency, Eleanor Roosevelt entered the claustrophobic, duty-bound existence of the First Lady with dread. By that time, she had put her deep disappointment in her marriage behind her and developed an independent life—now threatened by the public role she would be forced to play. A lifeline came to her in the form of a feisty campaign reporter for the Associated Press: Lorena Hickok. Over the next thirty years, until Eleanor’s death, the two women carried on an extraordinary relationship: They were, at different points, lovers, confidantes, professional advisors, and caring friends. They couldn't have been more different. Eleanor had been raised in one of the nation’s most powerful political families and was introduced to society as a debutante before marrying her distant cousin, Franklin. Hick, as she was known, had grown up poor in rural South Dakota and worked as a servant girl after she escaped an abusive home, eventually becoming one of the most respected reporters at the AP. Her admiration drew the buttoned-up Eleanor out of her shell, and the two quickly fell in love. For the next thirteen years, Hick had her own room at the White House, next door to the First Lady. These fiercely compassionate women inspired each other to right the wrongs of the turbulent era in which they lived. During the Depression, Hick reported from the nation’s poorest areas for the WPA, and Eleanor used these reports to lobby her husband for New Deal programs. Hick encouraged Eleanor to turn their frequent letters into her popular and long-lasting syndicated column "My Day," and to befriend the female journalists who became her champions. When Eleanor’s tenure as First Lady ended with FDR's death, Hick pushed her to continue to use her popularity for good—advice Eleanor took by leading the UN’s postwar Human Rights Commission. At every turn, the bond these women shared was grounded in their determination to better their troubled world. Deeply researched and told with great warmth, Eleanor and Hick is a vivid portrait of love and a revealing look at how an unlikely romance influenced some of the most consequential years in American history.



12 Bones Smokehouse

12 Bones Smokehouse Author Bryan King
ISBN-10 9780760347263
Release 2015-04-01
Pages 224
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From the famous smokehouse in North Carolina comes signature recipes and techniques for ribs, pulled pork, and all the fixin's that make a perfect BBQ.



Building Design Portfolios

Building Design Portfolios Author Sara Eisenman
ISBN-10 9781616735920
Release 2006-06-01
Pages 192
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Presenting one's portfolio is where every designer begins his or her career. Therefore, crafting a portfolio, whether online or for presentation in person, is an essential skill for survival. Because a portfolio can make or break a career, it is vital that designers go out armed with all the right moves and materials. This book talks both to the professionals who have both designed their own portfolios and those on the other side of the table who have looked at scores of portfolios, to uncover the tips and tricks that have won jobs, as well as the must-avoid moves that have lost opportunities. This book is not only a handbook for dos and don'ts; it also provides plenty of inspiration from a wide collection of portfolios, both virtual and real-life. This book asks leaders in the field about the real-world realities of presenting one's work for consideration and answers the question, "What sells and what doesn't."



The Outskirts of Hope

The Outskirts of Hope Author Jo Ivester
ISBN-10 9781631529658
Release 2015-04-07
Pages 280
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In 1967, when Jo Ivester was ten years old, her father transplanted his young family from a suburb of Boston to a small town in the heart of the Mississippi cotton fields, where he became the medical director of a clinic that served the poor population for miles around. But ultimately it was not Ivester’s father but her mother—a stay-at-home mother of four who became a high school English teacher when the family moved to the South—who made the most enduring mark on the town. In The Outskirts of Hope, Ivester uses journals left by her mother, as well as writings of her own, to paint a vivid, moving, and inspiring portrait of her family’s experiences living and working in an all-black town during the height of the civil rights movement.



Overcoming Celebrity Obsession

Overcoming Celebrity Obsession Author Diane Saks
ISBN-10 1450228488
Release 2011-08-01
Pages 484
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OVERCOMING CELEBRITY OBSESSION is a star-studded journey from celebrity obsession to fulfilling life in three easy phases. When a fan is obsessed, a story character version of the celebrity is created. It is through the fan’s celebrity characterization that guides the fan through Phase 1. Upon understanding why the fan was obsessed in the first place, the journey through Phase 2 begins. This is the dark part of the fan’s life that the fan used the favorite celebrity to escape from. Professional counseling is not recommended in Phase 1, but can begin in Phase 2. In order to get the most from Phase 3, the fan must be able to look at parts of his or her real life and pull out the celebrity obsession. For example, every time someone couldn’t communicate or understand me, I saw that as my John Travolta obsession. If I was not given a chance to help out during a particular event, that was my David Cassidy obsession. It is in Phase 3 where we discuss personal behavior and set goals both professional and personal. The typical celebrity obsession theory is, the obsession is because of hero worship. Until now, celebrity obsession therapy has been in the hands of “professionals” who have never lived through celebrity obsession. Typical celebrity obsession studies state, that obsessed people need to stop obsessing over celebrities and get on with life. Diane knows better than that. She believes the fan needs to take some time to celebrity obsess while in OVERCOMING CELEBRITY OBSESSION in order to work through what is stopping the fan from getting the most out of life. Why would you want to put your celebrity obsession into the hands of someone with an advanced college degree or two, who has never been celebrity obsessed?



Proud Shoes the Story of an American Family

Proud Shoes the Story of an American Family Author Pauli Murray
ISBN-10 1297491327
Release 2015-08-08
Pages 292
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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.



Southern Horrors

Southern Horrors Author Crystal Nicole Feimster
ISBN-10 0674035623
Release 2009
Pages 314
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Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence. Pairing the lives of two Southern womenâe"Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white womenâe"Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women. Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.