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The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation

The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation Author Darrel Wanzer-Serrano
ISBN-10 9781439912034
Release 2015-06-12
Pages 247
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The Young Lords was a multi-ethnic, though primarily Nuyorican, liberation organization that formed in El Barrio (Spanish Harlem) in July of 1969. Responding to oppressive approaches to the health, educational, and political needs of the Puerto Rican community, the movement’s revolutionary activism included organized protests and sit-ins targeting such concerns as trash pickups and lead paint hazards. The Young Lords advanced a thirteen-point political program that demanded community control of their institutions and land and challenged the exercise of power by the state and outsider-run institutions. In The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation, Darrel Wanzer-Serrano details the numerous community initiatives that advanced decolonial sensibilities in El Barrio and beyond. Using archival research and interviews, he crafts an engaging account of the Young Lords’ discourse and activism. He rescues the organization from historical obscurity and makes an argument for its continued relevance, enriching and informing contemporary discussions about Latino/a politics.



The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation

The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation Author Darrel Wanzer-Serrano
ISBN-10 1439912025
Release 2015-06-12
Pages 244
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The Young Lords was a multi-ethnic, though primarily Nuyorican, liberation organization that formed in El Barrio (Spanish Harlem) in July of 1969. Responding to oppressive approaches to the health, educational, and political needs of the Puerto Rican community, the movement’s revolutionary activism included organized protests and sit-ins targeting such concerns as trash pickups and lead paint hazards. The Young Lords advanced a thirteen-point political program that demanded community control of their institutions and land and challenged the exercise of power by the state and outsider-run institutions. In The New York Young Lords and the Struggle for Liberation, Darrel Wanzer-Serrano details the numerous community initiatives that advanced decolonial sensibilities in El Barrio and beyond. Using archival research and interviews, he crafts an engaging account of the Young Lords’ discourse and activism. He rescues the organization from historical obscurity and makes an argument for its continued relevance, enriching and informing contemporary discussions about Latino/a politics.



The Young Lords

The Young Lords Author Darrel Enck-Wanzer
ISBN-10 9780814722411
Release 2010-11-03
Pages 253
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The Young Lords, who originated as a Chicago street gang fighting gentrification and unfair evictions in Puerto Rican neighborhoods, burgeoned into a national political movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with headquarters in New York City and other centers in Philadelphia, Boston, Los Angeles, and elsewhere in the northeast and southern California. Part of the original Rainbow Coalition with the Black Panthers and Young Patriots, the politically radical Puerto Ricans who constituted the Young Lords instituted programs for political, social, and cultural change within the communities in which they operated. The Young Lords offers readers the opportunity to learn about this vibrant organization through their own words and images, collecting an array of their essays, journalism, photographs, speeches, and pamphlets. Organized topically and thematically, this volume highlights the Young Lords’ diverse and inventive activism around issues such as education, health care, gentrification, police injustice and gender equality, as well as self-determination for Puerto Rico. In recovering these rare written and visual materials, Darrel Enck-Wanzer has given voice to the lost chorus of the Young Lords, while providing an indispensable resource for students, scholars, activists, and others interested in learning about this influential grassroots “street political” organization.



We Took the Streets

We Took the Streets Author Miguel Melendez
ISBN-10 9780312267018
Release 2003
Pages 256
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The story of the radical Puerto Rican activist group of the 1960s recounts how they opened offices, published a newspaper, started an underground army, and demanded better social services for the Latino community in New York City.



Want to Start a Revolution

Want to Start a Revolution Author Dayo F. Gore
ISBN-10 9780814783146
Release 2009-12-01
Pages 353
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The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman? From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle. Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fernández, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.



Through the Eyes of Rebel Women

Through the Eyes of Rebel Women Author Iris Morales
ISBN-10 0996827617
Release 2016-09-09
Pages
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In the midst of the African American civil rights struggle, protests to end the Vietnam War, and feminists? uprising, the Young Lords emerged in New York in 1969. Through community organizing, mass protests, and direct actions, they mobilized a grassroots movement to demand justice for Puerto Ricans and other people of color. The Young Lords represented a new awakening of Puerto Rican militancy in the United States.Through the Eyes of Rebel Women is the Young Lords? story told by women members. Women joined to fight poverty and racism; to end gender discrimination; and to free Puerto Rico from US colonialism. Written and edited by former member Iris Morales, the collection includes essays, interviews, and articles that highlight women's diverse and powerful roles in the fight for women's rights and the radical transformation of society.



Spectacular Rhetorics

Spectacular Rhetorics Author Wendy Hesford
ISBN-10 9780822349518
Release 2011-08-05
Pages 275
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Scrutinizes spectacular rhetoric, the use of visual images and imagery to construct certain bodies, populations, and nations as victims and incorporate them into human rights discourses geared toward Westerners.



Just Remembering

Just Remembering Author Michael Warren Tumolo
ISBN-10 9781611478136
Release 2015-10-29
Pages 124
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Just Remembering: Rhetorics of Genocide Remembranceand Sociopolitical Judgment analyzes a set of influential discourses of genocide remembrance to explain how public memory discourses inform sociopolitical judgment. Within this explanatory context, Just Remembering additionally asks how we might remember pasts marked by genocidal violence in ways that commit ourselves to a deeper understanding and more humane practice of justice.



An African American and Latinx History of the United States

An African American and Latinx History of the United States Author Paul Ortiz
ISBN-10 9780807013106
Release 2018
Pages 296
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"Spanning more than two hundred years, An African American and Latinx History of the United States is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the "Global South" was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy, " and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism. Drawing on rich narratives and primary source documents, Ortiz links racial segregation in the Southwest and the rise and violent fall of a powerful tradition of Mexican labor organizing in the twentieth century, to May 1, 2006, known as International Workers' Day, when migrant laborers--Chicana/os, Afrocubanos, and immigrants from every continent on earth--united in resistance on the first "Day Without Immigrants." As African American civil rights activists fought against Jim Crow laws and Mexican labor organizers warred against the suffocating grip of capitalism, Black and Spanish-language newspapers, abolitionists, and Latin American revolutionaries coalesced around movements built between people from the United States and people from Central America and the Caribbean. And in stark contrast to the resurgence of "America first" rhetoric, Black and Latinx intellectuals and organizers today have urged the United States to build bridges of solidarity with the nations of the America. Incisive and timely, this bottom-up history, told from the interconnected vantage points of Latinx and African Americas, reveals the radically different ways that people of the diaspora have addressed issues still plaguing the United States today, and it offers a way forward in the continued struggle for universal civil rights."--Dust jacket.



Hillbilly Nationalists Urban Race Rebels and Black Power

Hillbilly Nationalists  Urban Race Rebels  and Black Power Author Amy Sonnie
ISBN-10 9781612190082
Release 2011-09-27
Pages 256
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THE STORY OF SOME OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND LITTLE-KNOWN ACTIVISTS OF THE 1960s, IN A DEEPLY SOURCED NARRATIVE HISTORY The historians of the late 1960s have emphasized the work of a group of white college activists who courageously took to the streets to protest the war in Vietnam and continuing racial inequality. Poor and working-class whites have tended to be painted as spectators, reactionaries, and, even, racists. Most Americans, the story goes, just watched the political movements of the sixties go by. James Tracy and Amy Sonnie, who have been interviewing activists from the era for nearly ten years, reject this old narrative. They show that poor and working-class radicals, inspired by the Civil Rights movement, the Black Panthers, and progressive populism, started to organize significant political struggles against racism and inequality during the 1960s and 1970s. Among these groups: + JOIN Community Union brought together southern migrants, student radicals, and welfare recipients in Chicago to fight for housing, health, and welfare . . . + The Young Patriots Organization and Rising Up Angry organized self-identified hillbillies, Chicago greasers, Vietnam vets, and young feminists into a legendary “Rainbow Coalition” with Black and Puerto Rican activists . . . + In Philadelphia, the October 4th Organization united residents of industrial Kensington against big business, war, and a repressive police force . . . + In the Bronx, White Lightning occupied hospitals and built coalitions with doctors to fight for the rights of drug addicts and the poor. Exploring an untold history of the New Left, the book shows how these groups helped to redefine community organizing—and transforms the way we think about a pivotal moment in U.S. history. From the Trade Paperback edition.



Standing in the Intersection

Standing in the Intersection Author Karma R. Chávez
ISBN-10 9781438444918
Release 2012-10-11
Pages 231
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Unpacks the myriad ways rhetorical and communication theories and feminist intersectional approaches impact one another.



Dirty River

Dirty River Author Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha
ISBN-10 9781551526010
Release 2016-01-04
Pages 240
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Lambda Literary Award finalist In 1996, poet Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha ran away from America with two backpacks and ended up in Canada, where she discovered queer anarchopunk love and revolution, yet remained haunted by the reasons she left home in the first place. This passionate and riveting memoir is a mixtape of dreams and nightmares, of immigration court lineups and queer South Asian dance nights; it reveals how a disabled queer woman of color and abuse survivor navigates the dirty river of the past and, as the subtitle suggests, "dreams her way home." Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha's poetry book Love Cake won a Lambda Literary Award.



Puerto Rico s Revolt for Independence

Puerto Rico s Revolt for Independence Author Olga Jiménez de Wagenheim
ISBN-10 1558760717
Release 1985
Pages 127
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This is the only available book that interprets Puerto Rico's first and most significant attempt to end its colonial dependence on Spain. Looking at the imperial policies and conditions within Puerto Rico which led to the 1868 rebellion known as El Grito de Lares. It compares the colonization of Puerto Rico with that of Spanish America, and explores why the island's independence movement began decades after Spain's other colonies in the region had revolted.



Look for Me in the Whirlwind

Look for Me in the Whirlwind Author Dhoruba Bin Wahad
ISBN-10 9781629634074
Release 2017-06-05
Pages 648
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In 1969, 21 members of the militant New York branch of the Black Panther Party were rounded up and indicted on multiple charges of violent acts and conspiracies. The membership of the NY 21, which includes the mother of Tupac Shakur, is largely forgotten and unknown. Their legacy, however—reflected upon here in this special edition—provides essential truths which have remained largely hidden.



Outlaws of America

Outlaws of America Author Dan Berger
ISBN-10 9781904859413
Release 2006
Pages 432
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The fiery true story of America's most famous radical fugitives, urgently and passionately told.



Palante

Palante Author Young Lords Party
ISBN-10 1608461297
Release 2011
Pages 153
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The first book by and about the Young Lords highlights the spirit of the 70's New York-based organization of Puerto Rican radicals and includes oral histories by members, interviews, and photographic essays.



A Voice That Could Stir an Army

A Voice That Could Stir an Army Author Maegan Parker Brooks
ISBN-10 9781626741652
Release 2014-04-30
Pages 240
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A sharecropper, a warrior, and a truth-telling prophet, Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977) stands as a powerful symbol not only of the 1960s black freedom movement, but also of the enduring human struggle against oppression. A Voice That Could Stir an Army is a rhetorical biography that tells the story of Hamer’s life by focusing on how she employed symbols— images, words, and even material objects such as the ballot, food, and clothing—to construct persuasive public personae, to influence audiences, and to effect social change. Drawing upon dozens of newly recovered Hamer texts and recent interviews with Hamer’s friends, family, and fellow activists, Maegan Parker Brooks moves chronologically through Hamer’s life. Brooks recounts Hamer’s early influences, her intersection with the black freedom movement, and her rise to prominence at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Brooks also considers Hamer’s lesser-known contributions to the fight against poverty and to feminist politics before analyzing how Hamer is remembered posthumously. The book concludes by emphasizing what remains rhetorical about Hamer’s biography, using the 2012 statue and museum dedication in Hamer’s hometown of Ruleville, Mississippi, to examine the larger social, political, and historiographical implications of her legacy. The sustained consideration of Hamer’s wide-ranging use of symbols and the reconstruction of her legacy provided within the pages of A Voice That Could Stir an Army enrich understanding of this key historical figure. This book also demonstrates how rhetorical analysis complements historical reconstruction to explain the dynamics of how social movements actually operate.