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The Revolutionary War

The Revolutionary War Author Jack Johnson
ISBN-10 1523402547
Release 2016-01-13
Pages 228
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"The Revolutionary War: The Making of America" retells the story of the American Revolution in a way that captures your attention and is as educational as it is entertaining. This book covers the events of the American Revolution, but also their cultural and historical significance. This book also overviews the most important players on both sides of the conflict, and pays special attention to the key figures who led this military and political struggle and went on to found the American republic. Millions of words have been spilled in discussions of the American Revolution. It might make you wonder, how does this small book make any difference? The difference I hope to make is to introduce you to the Revolution at breakneck speed. Don't be fooled by the size of this book; it's small, but it's still packed with information that other books tend to forget. This book does not seek to add something new to our understanding of the Revolution, nor does it review the events from a perspective that has never been considered. Instead, "The Making of America" should be read as an easy-to-read reference point that contains from cover to cover everything you need to know about the American Revolution.



Betsy Ross and the Making of America

Betsy Ross and the Making of America Author Marla R. Miller
ISBN-10 1429952377
Release 2010-04-27
Pages 480
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A richly woven biography of the beloved patriot Betsy Ross, and an enthralling portrait of everyday life in Revolutionary War-era Philadelphia Betsy Ross and the Making of America is the first comprehensively researched and elegantly written biography of one of America's most captivating figures of the Revolutionary War. Drawing on new sources and bringing a fresh, keen eye to the fabled creation of "the first flag," Marla R. Miller thoroughly reconstructs the life behind the legend. This authoritative work provides a close look at the famous seamstress while shedding new light on the lives of the artisan families who peopled the young nation and crafted its tools, ships, and homes. Betsy Ross occupies a sacred place in the American consciousness, and Miller's winning narrative finally does her justice. This history of the ordinary craftspeople of the Revolutionary War and their most famous representative will be the definitive volume for years to come.



Washington s Revolution

Washington s Revolution Author Robert Middlekauff
ISBN-10 9781101872390
Release 2016-02
Pages 400
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Presents a portrait of the formative years that shaped the first American President and offers detailed psychological insights into his beliefs, passions and patriotism.



James Madison and the Making of America

James Madison and the Making of America Author Kevin R. C. Gutzman
ISBN-10 9781429941006
Release 2012-02-14
Pages 432
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In James Madison and the Making of America, historian Kevin Gutzman looks beyond the way James Madison is traditionally seen -- as "The Father of the Constitution" -- to find a more complex and sometimes contradictory portrait of this influential Founding Father and the ways in which he influenced the spirit of today's United States. Instead of an idealized portrait of Madison, Gutzman treats readers to the flesh-and-blood story of a man who often performed his founding deeds in spite of himself: Madison's fame rests on his participation in the writing of The Federalist Papers and his role in drafting the Bill of Rights and Constitution. Today, his contribution to those documents is largely misunderstood. He thought that the Bill of Rights was unnecessary and insisted that it not be included in the Constitution, a document he found entirely inadequate and predicted would soon fail. Madison helped to create the first American political party, the first party to call itself "Republican", but only after he had argued that political parties, in general, were harmful. Madison served as Secretary of State and then as President during the early years of the United States and the War of 1812; however, the American foreign policy he implemented in 1801-1817 ultimately resulted in the British burning down the Capitol and the White House. In so many ways, the contradictions both in Madison's thinking and in the way he governed foreshadowed the conflicted state of our Union now. His greatest legacy—the disestablishment of Virginia's state church and adoption of the libertarian Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom—is often omitted from discussion of his career. Yet, understanding the way in which Madison saw the relationship between the church and state is key to understanding the real man. Kevin Gutzman's James Madison and the Making of America promises to become the standard biography of our fourth President.



Masters of Empire

Masters of Empire Author Michael McDonnell
ISBN-10 9780374714185
Release 2015-12-08
Pages 416
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A radical reinterpretation of early American history from a native point of view In Masters of Empire, the historian Michael McDonnell reveals the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America. Though less well known than the Iroquois or Sioux, the Anishinaabeg who lived along Lakes Michigan and Huron were equally influential. McDonnell charts their story, and argues that the Anishinaabeg have been relegated to the edges of history for too long. Through remarkable research into 19th-century Anishinaabeg-authored chronicles, McDonnell highlights the long-standing rivalries and relationships among the great tribes of North America, and how Europeans often played only a minor role in their stories. McDonnell reminds us that it was native people who possessed intricate and far-reaching networks of trade and kinship, of which the French and British knew little. And as empire encroached upon their domain, the Anishinaabeg were often the ones doing the exploiting. By dictating terms at trading posts and frontier forts, they played a crucial role in the making of early America. Through vivid depictions of early conflicts, the French and Indian War, and Pontiac's Rebellion, all from a native perspective, Masters of Empire overturns our assumptions about colonial America and the origins of the Revolutionary War. By calling attention to the Great Lakes as a crucible of culture and conflict, McDonnell reimagines the landscape of American history.



Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton Author Teri Kanefield
ISBN-10 9781683350811
Release 2017-03-07
Pages 224
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The America that Alexander Hamilton knew was largely agricultural and built on slave labor. He envisioned something else: a multi-racial, urbanized, capitalistic America with a strong central government. He believed that such an America would be a land of opportunity for the poor and the newcomers. But Hamilton’s vision put him at odds with his archrivals who envisioned a pastoral America of small towns, where governments were local, states would control their own destiny, and the federal government would remain small and weak. The disputes that arose during America’s first decades continued through American history to our present day. Over time, because of the systems Hamilton set up and the ideas he left, his vision won out. Here is the story that epitomizes the American dream—a poor immigrant who made good in America. In the end, Hamilton rose from poverty through his intelligence and ability, and did more to shape our country than any of his contemporaries. Related subjects and concepts discussed in the book include: Law and Legal Concepts Due process Bill of Rights Freedom of Speech and the Press Originalism / nonoriginalism (theories of Constitutional interpretation) Government Checks and Balances Democracy Electoral College Republic Financial Concepts Capitalism Credit Inflation Interest Mercantilism Securities: Stocks and Bonds Tariffs Taxes Miscellaneous Demagogues Dueling Pastoralism About the Series The Making of America series traces the constitutional history of the United States through overlapping biographies of American men and women. The debates that raged when our nation was founded have been argued ever since: How should the Constitution be interpreted? What is the meaning, and where are the limits of personal liberty? What is the proper role of the federal government? Who should be included in “we the people”? Each biography in the series tells the story of an American leader who helped shape the United States of today.



Slavery and the Making of America

Slavery and the Making of America Author James Oliver Horton
ISBN-10 9780195304510
Release 2006
Pages 254
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The history of slavery is central to understanding the history of the United States. Slavery and the Making of America offers a richly illustrated, vividly written history that illuminates the human side of this inhumane institution, presenting it largely through stories of the slaves themselves. Readers will discover a wide ranging and sharply nuanced look at American slavery, from the first Africans brought to British colonies in the early seventeenth century to the end of Reconstruction. The authors document the horrors of slavery, particularly in the deep South, and describe the valiant struggles to escape bondage, from dramatic tales of slaves such as William and Ellen Craft to Dred Scott's doomed attempt to win his freedom through the Supreme Court. We see how slavery set our nation on the road of violence, from bloody riots that broke out in American cities over fugitive slaves, to the cataclysm of the Civil War. Along the way, readers meet such individuals as "Black Sam" Fraunces, a West Indian mulatto who owned the Queen's Head Tavern in New York City, a key meeting place for revolutionaries in the 1760s and 1770s and Sergeant William H. Carney, who won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery at the crucial assault on Fort Wagner duringthe Civil War as well as Benjamin "Pap" Singleton, a former slave who led freed African Americans to a new life on the American frontier.



The First Way of War

The First Way of War Author John Grenier
ISBN-10 1139444700
Release 2005-01-31
Pages
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This 2005 book explores the evolution of Americans' first way of war, to show how war waged against Indian noncombatant population and agricultural resources became the method early Americans employed and, ultimately, defined their military heritage. The sanguinary story of the American conquest of the Indian peoples east of the Mississippi River helps demonstrate how early Americans embraced warfare shaped by extravagant violence and focused on conquest. Grenier provides a major revision in understanding the place of warfare directed on noncombatants in the American military tradition, and his conclusions are relevant to understand US 'special operations' in the War on Terror.



The Idea of America

The Idea of America Author Gordon S. Wood
ISBN-10 1101515147
Release 2011-05-12
Pages 400
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The preeminent historian of the American Revolution explains why it remains the most significant event in our history. More than almost any other nation in the world, the United States began as an idea. For this reason, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Gordon S. Wood believes that the American Revolution is the most important event in our history, bar none. Since American identity is so fluid and not based on any universally shared heritage, we have had to continually return to our nation's founding to understand who we are. In The Idea of America, Wood reflects on the birth of American nationhood and explains why the revolution remains so essential. In a series of elegant and illuminating essays, Wood explores the ideological origins of the revolution-from ancient Rome to the European Enlightenment-and the founders' attempts to forge an American democracy. As Wood reveals, while the founders hoped to create a virtuous republic of yeoman farmers and uninterested leaders, they instead gave birth to a sprawling, licentious, and materialistic popular democracy. Wood also traces the origins of American exceptionalism to this period, revealing how the revolutionary generation, despite living in a distant, sparsely populated country, believed itself to be the most enlightened people on earth. The revolution gave Americans their messianic sense of purpose-and perhaps our continued propensity to promote democracy around the world-because the founders believed their colonial rebellion had universal significance for oppressed peoples everywhere. Yet what may seem like audacity in retrospect reflected the fact that in the eighteenth century republicanism was a truly radical ideology-as radical as Marxism would be in the nineteenth-and one that indeed inspired revolutionaries the world over. Today there exists what Wood calls a terrifying gap between us and the founders, such that it requires almost an act of imagination to fully recapture their era. Because we now take our democracy for granted, it is nearly impossible for us to appreciate how deeply the founders feared their grand experiment in liberty could evolve into monarchy or dissolve into licentiousness. Gracefully written and filled with insight, The Idea of America helps us to recapture the fears and hopes of the revolutionary generation and its attempts to translate those ideals into a working democracy. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s smash Broadway musical Hamilton has sparked new interest in the Revolutionary War and the Founding Fathers. In addition to Alexander Hamilton, the production also features George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Aaron Burr, Lafayette, and many more. Look for Gordon's new book, Friends Divided.



Forced Founders

Forced Founders Author Woody Holton
ISBN-10 9780807899861
Release 2011-01-20
Pages 256
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In this provocative reinterpretation of one of the best-known events in American history, Woody Holton shows that when Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and other elite Virginians joined their peers from other colonies in declaring independence from Britain, they acted partly in response to grassroots rebellions against their own rule. The Virginia gentry's efforts to shape London's imperial policy were thwarted by British merchants and by a coalition of Indian nations. In 1774, elite Virginians suspended trade with Britain in order to pressure Parliament and, at the same time, to save restive Virginia debtors from a terrible recession. The boycott and the growing imperial conflict led to rebellions by enslaved Virginians, Indians, and tobacco farmers. By the spring of 1776 the gentry believed the only way to regain control of the common people was to take Virginia out of the British Empire. Forced Founders uses the new social history to shed light on a classic political question: why did the owners of vast plantations, viewed by many of their contemporaries as aristocrats, start a revolution? As Holton's fast-paced narrative unfolds, the old story of patriot versus loyalist becomes decidedly more complex.



The Half Has Never Been Told

The Half Has Never Been Told Author Edward E. Baptist
ISBN-10 9780465097685
Release 2016-10-25
Pages 560
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Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end—and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.



The Making of Modern Immigration An Encyclopedia of People and Ideas 2 volumes

The Making of Modern Immigration  An Encyclopedia of People and Ideas  2 volumes Author Patrick J. Hayes
ISBN-10 9780313392030
Release 2012-02-13
Pages 828
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Combining the insight of two-dozen expert contributors to examine key figures, events, and policies over 200 years of U.S. immigration history, this work illuminates the foundations of the ethnic and socioeconomic makeup of our nation. • 45 entries covering such issues as the Alien and Sedition Acts, asylees, immigration and customs enforcement, immigration and religion, and U.S.–Mexico border relations • Contributions from an international collaborative of 24 scholars from the social and human sciences • Photographs • A timeline • Entry-specific bibliographies and a lengthy general bibliography



Making America A History of the United States Volume I To 1877

Making America  A History of the United States  Volume I  To 1877 Author Carol Berkin
ISBN-10 9780618994854
Release 2007-10-22
Pages 552
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Shaped with a clear political chronology, Making America reflects the variety of individual experiences and kaleidoscope of cultures that is American society. Careful to maintain its emphasis on the importance of social movements, immigrant society, and regional and political differences in American history, the Fifth Edition of Making America brings greater attention to global influences and America's role in the world. Making America serves the needs of instructors whose classrooms reflect the diversity of today's college students. The strongly chronological narrative, together with an integrated program of learning and teaching aids, makes the historical content vivid and comprehensible to students at all levels of preparedness. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.



A People s History of the United States

A People s History of the United States Author Howard Zinn
ISBN-10 9781317325307
Release 2015-08-12
Pages 744
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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.



Revolutionary Founders

Revolutionary Founders Author Alfred F. Young
ISBN-10 9780307455994
Release 2012-04
Pages 452
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Explores the founding fathers' more radical contemporaries, who advocated for true liberty for all at the United States' inception, including the abolition of slavery and equality despite race, class, or gender.



Muslims and the Making of America

Muslims and the Making of America Author Amir Hussain
ISBN-10 1481306227
Release 2016-10-15
Pages 150
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"There has never been an America without Muslims"---so begins Amir Hussain, one of the most important scholars and teachers of Islam in America. Hussain, who is himself an American Muslim, contends tat Muslims played an essential role in the creation and cultivation of the United States. In Muslims and the Making of America, Hussain directly address the stereotypes of Muslims following 9/11 and terrorism. Far from undermining America, Islam and Americaqn Muslims have been, and continue to be, important threads in the fabric of American Life. Hussain chronicles the history of Islam in American to underscore the valuable cultural influence of Muslims on American Life. He then rivets attention on music, sports, and culture as key areas in which Muslims have shaped and transformed American Identity. American, Hussain concludes, would not exist as it does today without the essential contributions made by its Muslim citizens.



Among the Powers of the Earth

Among the Powers of the Earth Author Eliga H. Gould
ISBN-10 9780674065024
Release 2012-03-19
Pages 342
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"For most Americans, the Revolution's main achievement is summed up by the phrase 'life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.' Yet far from a straightforward attempt to be free of Old World laws and customs, the American founding was also a bid for inclusion in the community of nations as it existed in 1776. America aspired to diplomatic recognition under international law and the authority to become a colonizing power itself. The Revolution was an international transformation of the first importance. To conform to the public law of Europe's imperial powers, Americans crafted a union nearly as centralized as the one they had overthrown, endured taxes heavier than any they had faced as British colonists, and remained entangled with European Atlantic empires long after the Revolution ended. No factor weighed more heavily on Americans than the legally plural Atlantic where they hoped to build their empire. Gould follows the region's transfiguration from a fluid periphery with its own rules and norms to a place where people of all descriptions were expected to abide by the laws of Western Europe -- 'civilized' laws that precluded neither slavery nor the dispossession of Native Americans."--Jacket.