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The Right Kind of Revolution

The Right Kind of Revolution Author Michael E. Latham
ISBN-10 0801477263
Release 2011
Pages 246
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"Well written, broad-gauged, and just plain smart, The Right Kind of Revolution ably synthesizes, indeed moves beyond, the scholarship on American efforts to `improve' the Third World. The new standard work on American modernization and development policies, it has much to teach scholars and graduate students while still being suitable for use in undergraduate courses."---David Engerman, Brandeis University, author of Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts Development, and the Global Cold War and Knowledge and Postmodernism in Historical Perspective.



The right kind of revolution

The right kind of revolution Author Michael E. Latham
ISBN-10 0801460565
Release 2010-12-10
Pages 256
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After World War II, a powerful conviction took hold among American intellectuals and policymakers: that the United States could profoundly accelerate and ultimately direct the development of the decolonizing world, serving as a modernizing force around the globe. By accelerating economic growth, promoting agricultural expansion, and encouraging the rise of enlightened elites, they hoped to link development with security, preventing revolutions and rapidly creating liberal, capitalist states. In The Right Kind of Revolution, Michael E. Latham explores the role of modernization and development in U.S. foreign policy from the early Cold War through the present. The modernization project rarely went as its architects anticipated. Nationalist leaders in postcolonial states such as India, Ghana, and Egypt pursued their own independent visions of development. Attempts to promote technological solutions to development problems also created unintended consequences by increasing inequality, damaging the environment, and supporting coercive social policies. In countries such as Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Iran, U.S. officials and policymakers turned to modernization as a means of counterinsurgency and control, ultimately shoring up dictatorial regimes and exacerbating the very revolutionary dangers they wished to resolve. Those failures contributed to a growing challenge to modernization theory in the late 1960s and 1970s. Since the end of the Cold War the faith in modernization as a panacea has reemerged. The idea of a global New Deal, however, has been replaced by a neoliberal emphasis on the power of markets to shape developing nations in benevolent ways. U.S. policymakers have continued to insist that history has a clear, universal direction, but events in Iraq and Afghanistan give the lie to modernization's false hopes and appealing promises.



Df Right Kind of Revolution Z

Df Right Kind of Revolution Z Author Michael E. Latham
ISBN-10 0801460530
Release 2011
Pages 246
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After World War II, a powerful conviction took hold among American intellectuals and policymakers: that the United States could profoundly accelerate and ultimately direct the development of the decolonizing world, serving as a modernizing force around the globe. By accelerating economic growth, promoting agricultural expansion, and encouraging the rise of enlightened elites, they hoped to link development with security, preventing revolutions and rapidly creating liberal, capitalist states. In The Right Kind of Revolution, Michael E. Latham explores the role of modernization and development in U.S. foreign policy from the early Cold War through the present. The modernization project rarely went as its architects anticipated. Nationalist leaders in postcolonial states such as India, Ghana, and Egypt pursued their own independent visions of development. Attempts to promote technological solutions to development problems also created unintended consequences by increasing inequality, damaging the environment, and supporting coercive social policies. In countries such as Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Iran, U.S. officials and policymakers turned to modernization as a means of counterinsurgency and control, ultimately shoring up dictatorial regimes and exacerbating the very revolutionary dangers they wished to resolve. Those failures contributed to a growing challenge to modernization theory in the late 1960s and 1970s. Since the end of the Cold War the faith in modernization as a panacea has reemerged. The idea of a global New Deal, however, has been replaced by a neoliberal emphasis on the power of markets to shape developing nations in benevolent ways. U.S. policymakers have continued to insist that history has a clear, universal direction, but events in Iraq and Afghanistan give the lie to modernization's false hopes and appealing promises.



Staging Growth

Staging Growth Author David C. Engerman
ISBN-10 1558493700
Release 2003
Pages 283
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Beginning in the 1950s, the theory of modernization emerged as the dominant paradigm of sconomic, social, and political development within the America foreign policy establishment. This collection of essays attempts to shed fresh light on the global forces that shaped the Cold War and its legacies.



Mandarins of the Future

Mandarins of the Future Author Nils Gilman
ISBN-10 0801886333
Release 2007-02-15
Pages 344
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Because it provided the dominant framework for the "development" of poor, postcolonial countries, modernization theory ranks among the most important constructs of twentieth-century social science. In Mandarins of the Future, Nils Gilman offers the first intellectual history of a movement that has had far-reaching, and often unintended, consequences.



Modernization as Ideology

Modernization as Ideology Author Michael E. Latham
ISBN-10 0807848441
Release 2000
Pages 288
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Providing new insight on the intellectual and cultural dimensions of the Cold War, Michael Latham reveals how social science theory helped shape American foreign policy during the Kennedy administration. He shows how, in the midst of America's protracted



The Hungry World

The Hungry World Author Nick Cullather
ISBN-10 9780674058828
Release 2011-04-01
Pages 368
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Cullather has written an engrossing history of how the United States government, along with private philanthropies like the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, aimed to win the hearts and bodies of rural Asia in the post World War II decades by crafting strategies to develop and modernize agriculture and the peasant’s way of life. He explains how America used foreign aid, modernization theory, nutrition, statistics, and technology, to try to reconstruct the social and political order of the decolonized and disadvantaged countries in the region. Initially the issue of how best to intervene in Asia’s rural countryside was contentious, with clashing visions of development and humanitarian aid being argued throughout the 50’s and 60’s. Ultimately, one strategy displaced all the others—the “Green Revolution” and the ability to feed millions through the miracle of genetically designed dwarf strains of grain and rice. Cullather provides a detailed explanation of how this policy of feeding Asian peasants became the single strategy of “progress” adopted by the US rather than industrialization or land reform. As current controversy swirls about how best to aid Africa in the crisis of nation-building, famine, and a poverty-stricken peasantry, the story of the U.S. interventions in Asia become starkly relevant.



Imagining the Middle East

Imagining the Middle East Author Matthew F. Jacobs
ISBN-10 9780807834886
Release 2011
Pages 318
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As its interests have become deeply tied to the Middle East, the United States has long sought to develop a usable understanding of the people, politics, and cultures of the region. In Imagining the Middle East, Matthew Jacobs illuminates how Ameri



Ideology and U S Foreign Policy

Ideology and U  S  Foreign Policy Author Michael H. Hunt
ISBN-10 9780300158861
Release 2009-04-01
Pages 276
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This new edition of Michael H. Hunt's classic reinterpretation of American diplomatic history includes a preface that reflects on the personal experience and intellectual agenda behind the writing of the book, surveys the broad impact of the book's argument, and addresses the challenges to the thesis since the book's original publication. In the wake of 9/11 this interpretation is more pertinent than ever. Praise for the previous edition: Clearly written and historically sound. . . . A subtle critique and analysis.Gaddis Smith, Foreign Affairs A lean, plain-spoken treatment of a grand subject. . . . A bold piece of criticism and advocacy. . . . The right focus of the argument may insure its survival as one of the basic postwar critiques of U.S. policy.John W. Dower, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists A work of intellectual vigor and daring, impressive in its scholarship and imaginative in its use of material.Ronald Steel, Reviews in American History A masterpiece of historical compression.Wilson Quarterly A penetrating and provocative study. . . . A pleasure both to read and to contemplate.John Martz, Journal of Politics



US Foreign Policy and the Modernization of Iran

US Foreign Policy and the Modernization of Iran Author Ben Offiler
ISBN-10 9781137482211
Release 2015-07-19
Pages 227
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US Foreign Policy and the Modernization of Iran examines the evolution of US-Iranian relations during the presidencies of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard M. Nixon. It demonstrates how successive administrations struggled to exert influence over the Shah of Iran's regime domestic and foreign policy.



Fallout Shelter

Fallout Shelter Author David Monteyne
ISBN-10 9780816669752
Release 2011
Pages 348
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Tracing the partnership between architects and American civil defense officials during the Cold War.



Nearest East

Nearest East Author Hans-Lukas Kieser
ISBN-10 9781439902240
Release 2010-03-12
Pages 224
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How missionaries and evangelical politics influenced American government policy in the Middle East.



Modernization from the Other Shore

Modernization from the Other Shore Author David C. Engerman
ISBN-10 0674036522
Release 2009-06
Pages 410
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From the late nineteenth century to the eve of World War II, America's experts on Russia watched as Russia and the Soviet Union embarked on a course of rapid industrialization. Captivated by the idea of modernization, diplomats, journalists, and scholars across the political spectrum rationalized the enormous human cost of this path to progress. In a fascinating examination of this crucial era, David Engerman underscores the key role economic development played in America's understanding of Russia and explores its profound effects on U.S. policy. American intellectuals from George Kennan to Samuel Harper to Calvin Hoover understood Russian events in terms of national character. Many of them used stereotypes of Russian passivity, backwardness, and fatalism to explain the need for--and the costs of--Soviet economic development. These costs included devastating famines that left millions starving while the government still exported grain. This book is a stellar example of the new international history that seamlessly blends cultural and intellectual currents with policymaking and foreign relations. It offers valuable insights into the role of cultural differences and the shaping of economic policy for developing nations even today.



Cold War Germany the Third World and the Global Humanitarian Regime

Cold War Germany  the Third World  and the Global Humanitarian Regime Author Young-sun Hong
ISBN-10 9781316241202
Release 2015-03-05
Pages
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This book examines competition and collaboration among Western powers, the socialist bloc, and the Third World for control over humanitarian aid programs during the Cold War. Young-sun Hong's analysis reevaluates the established parameters of German history. On the one hand, global humanitarian efforts functioned as an arena for a three-way political power struggle. On the other, they gave rise to transnational spaces that allowed for multidimensional social and cultural encounters. Hong paints an unexpected view of the global humanitarian regime: Algerian insurgents flown to East Germany for medical care, barefoot Chinese doctors in Tanzania, and West and East German doctors working together in the Congo. She also provides a rich analysis of the experiences of African trainees and Asian nurses in the two Germanys. This book brings an urgently needed historical perspective to contemporary debates on global governance, which largely concern humanitarianism, global health, south-north relationships, and global migration.



Enlightened Aid

Enlightened Aid Author Amanda Kay McVety
ISBN-10 9780199796915
Release 2012-03-30
Pages 297
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Enlightened Aid examines the intellectual and political origins of Point Four, the first American aid program for the developing world, and the economic and diplomatic implications of its operations in Ethiopia.



Politics and Foreign Policy in Turkey Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Politics and Foreign Policy in Turkey  Historical and Contemporary Perspectives Author Kilic Kanat
ISBN-10 9786054023547
Release
Pages 194
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This edited volume is the product of the Young Scholars on Turkey (YSOT) Conference held in Washington, D.C. on February 12, 2014. We have worked with the presenters of the conference to transform their paper presentations into chapter-long analyses of various domestic and foreign policy issues in Turkey. The diversity of papers in terms of content and approach, combining historical analyses, theoretical exercises, and case studies, makes this compilation an interesting read for both academic and policy audiences. Chapters provide us with fresh research findings from early career academics on domestic and foreign policy issues. We hope that they contribute to a growing number of nuanced and careful analyses on Turkey.



The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development

The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development Author María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
ISBN-10 9780822385240
Release 2003-10-17
Pages 381
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In The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development, María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo boldly argues that crucial twentieth-century revolutionary challenges to colonialism and capitalism in the Americas have failed to resist—and in fact have been constitutively related to—the very developmentalist narratives that have justified and naturalized postwar capitalism. Saldaña-Portillo brings the critique of development discourse to bear on such exemplars of revolutionary and resistant political thought and practice as Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Malcolm X, the Sandinista government of Nicaragua, and the Guatemalan guerrilla resistance. She suggests that for each of these, developmentalist constructions frame the struggle as a heroic movement from unconsciousness to consciousness, from a childlike backwardness toward a disciplined and self-aware maturity. Reading governmental reports, memos, and policies, Saldaña-Portillo traces the arc of development narratives from its beginnings in the 1944 Bretton Woods conference through its apex during Robert S. McNamara's reign at the World Bank (1968–1981). She compares these narratives with models of subjectivity and agency embedded in the autobiographical texts of three revolutionary icons of the 1960s and 1970s—those of Che Guevara, Guatemalan insurgent Mario Payeras, and Malcolm X—and the agricultural policy of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN). Saldaña-Portillo highlights a shared paradigm of a masculinist transformation of the individual requiring the "transcendence" of ethnic particularity for the good of the nation. While she argues that this model of progress often alienated the very communities targeted by the revolutionaries, she shows how contemporary insurgents such as Rigoberta Menchú, the Zapatista movement, and queer Aztlán have taken up the radicalism of their predecessors to retheorize revolutionary subjectivity for the twenty-first century.