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The Rise of Gospel Blues

The Rise of Gospel Blues Author Michael W. Harris
ISBN-10 0195358112
Release 1994-06-23
Pages 353
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career of its founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatly influenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Award indicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which this music was shaped.



The Rise of Gospel Blues

The Rise of Gospel Blues Author Michael W. Harris
ISBN-10 9780195090574
Release 1994-04
Pages 324
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career ofits founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatlyinfluenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Awardindicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which thismusic was shaped.



The Rise of Gospel Blues

The Rise of Gospel Blues Author Michael W. Harris
ISBN-10 9780199879885
Release 1994-06-23
Pages 352
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career of its founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatly influenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Award indicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which this music was shaped.



Rise of Gospel Blues

Rise of Gospel Blues Author Michael W. Harris
ISBN-10 OCLC:59911987
Release 1992
Pages 320
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Rise of Gospel Blues has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Rise of Gospel Blues also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Rise of Gospel Blues book for free.



Father of Black Gospel Music an Interview

Father of Black Gospel Music an Interview Author Robert L. Taylor
ISBN-10 9781466987821
Release 2013-11-19
Pages 54
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Mr. Thomas Andrew Dorseys telephone number was given to the writer of this newly released book by the name, Thomas A. Dorsey, Father of Black Gospel Music An Interview, by a directory assistance operator in Chicago, Illinois. The writer, at the time, (1975) took a chance and called, not expecting the first publisher of Black Gospel Music, to answer the phone. A very hoarse voice said Hello, and the writer recognized it immediately as being the voice he had heard on a recording about Gospel Music that Mr. Dorsey had done. After being asked if he would consent to being interviewed Mr. Dorsey unenthusiastically said yes. He was unenthusiastic the writer later discovered, because fortune hunters and status seekers had been plaguing him for interviews. Honored that Mr. Dorsey had said yes, the writer took a train from Kansas City, Missouri to Chicago, to interview this man who had written hundreds of songs.



Songsters and Saints

Songsters and Saints Author Paul Oliver
ISBN-10 0521269423
Release 1984-09-27
Pages 339
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Paul Oliver rediscovers the wealth of neglected vocal traditions represented on Race records.



A Blues Bibliography

A Blues Bibliography Author Robert Ford
ISBN-10 9781135865085
Release 2008-03-31
Pages 1400
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A Blues Bibliography, Second Edition is a revised and enlarged version of the definitive blues bibliography first published in 1999. Material previously omitted from the first edition has now been included, and the bibliography has been expanded to include works published since then. In addition to biographical references, this work includes entries on the history and background of the blues, instruments, record labels, reference sources, regional variations and lyric transcriptions and musical analysis. The Blues Bibliography is an invaluable guide to the enthusiastic market among libraries specializing in music and African-American culture and among individual blues scholars.



Chicago s New Negroes

Chicago s New Negroes Author Davarian L. Baldwin
ISBN-10 0807887609
Release 2009-11-30
Pages 384
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As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh model of urban culture rich with politics, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship. Baldwin explores an abundant archive of cultural formations where an array of white observers, black cultural producers, critics, activists, reformers, and black migrant consumers converged in what he terms a "marketplace intellectual life." Here the thoughts and lives of Madam C. J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Andrew "Rube" Foster, Elder Lucy Smith, Jack Johnson, and Thomas Dorsey emerge as individual expressions of a much wider spectrum of black political and intellectual possibilities. By placing consumer-based amusements alongside the more formal arenas of church and academe, Baldwin suggests important new directions for both the historical study and the constructive future of ideas and politics in American life.



More Than Precious Memories

More Than Precious Memories Author Michael P. Graves
ISBN-10 0865548579
Release 2004
Pages 310
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"More than Precious Memories is the first book of its kind - a collection of essays offering scholarly analysis and interpretation of Southern Gospel Music. Believing Southern Gospel Music to be a significant cultural and religious phenomenon worthy of the best efforts of scholarship, Graves and Fillingim have assembled a diverse group of scholars who apply a variety of methods and theories to the task of understanding Southern Gospel Music and its cultural context."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved



Chicago Jazz

Chicago Jazz Author William Howland Kenney
ISBN-10 9780190282431
Release 1994-10-27
Pages 256
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The setting is the Royal Gardens Cafe. It's dark, smoky. The smell of gin permeates the room. People are leaning over the balcony, their drinks spilling on the customers below. On stage, King Oliver and Louis Armstrong roll on and on, piling up choruses, the rhythm section building the beat until tables, chairs, walls, people, move with the rhythm. The time is the 1920s. The place is South Side Chicago, a town of dance halls and cabarets, Prohibition and segregation, a town where jazz would flourish into the musical statement of an era. In Chicago Jazz, William Howland Kenney offers a wide-ranging look at jazz in the Windy City, revealing how Chicago became the major center of jazz in the 1920s, one of the most vital periods in the history of the music. He describes how the migration of blacks from the South to Chicago during and after World War I set the stage for the development of jazz in Chicago; and how the nightclubs and cabarets catering to both black and white customers provided the social setting for jazz performances. Kenney discusses the arrival of King Oliver and other greats in Chicago in the late teens and the early 1920s, especially Louis Armstrong, who would become the most influential jazz player of the period. And he travels beyond South Side Chicago to look at the evolution of white jazz, focusing on the influence of the South Side school on such young white players as Mezz Mezzrow (who adopted the mannerisms of black show business performers, an urbanized southern black accent, and black slang); and Max Kaminsky, deeply influenced by Armstrong's "electrifying tone, his superb technique, his power and ease, his hotness and intensity, his complete mastery of the horn." The personal recollections of many others--including Milt Hinton, Wild Bill Davison, Bud Freeman, and Jimmy McPartland--bring alive this exciting period in jazz history. Here is a new interpretation of Chicago jazz that reveals the role of race, culture, and politics in the development of this daring musical style. From black-and-tan cabarets and the Savoy Ballroom, to the Friars Inn and Austin High, Chicago Jazz brings to life the hustle and bustle of the sounds and styles of musical entertainment in the famous toddlin' town.



Techno Rebels

Techno Rebels Author
ISBN-10 0814332188
Release 2010
Pages 163
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Techno Rebels has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Techno Rebels also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Techno Rebels book for free.



Singing in My Soul

Singing in My Soul Author Jerma A. Jackson
ISBN-10 9780807863619
Release 2005-12-15
Pages 208
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Black gospel music grew from obscure nineteenth-century beginnings to become the leading style of sacred music in black American communities after World War II. Jerma A. Jackson traces the music's unique history, profiling the careers of several singers--particularly Sister Rosetta Tharpe--and demonstrating the important role women played in popularizing gospel. Female gospel singers initially developed their musical abilities in churches where gospel prevailed as a mode of worship. Few, however, stayed exclusively in the religious realm. As recordings and sheet music pushed gospel into the commercial arena, gospel began to develop a life beyond the church, spreading first among a broad spectrum of African Americans and then to white middle-class audiences. Retail outlets, recording companies, and booking agencies turned gospel into big business, and local church singers emerged as national and international celebrities. Amid these changes, the music acquired increasing significance as a source of black identity. These successes, however, generated fierce controversy. As gospel gained public visibility and broad commercial appeal, debates broke out over the meaning of the music and its message, raising questions about the virtues of commercialism and material values, the contours of racial identity, and the nature of the sacred. Jackson engages these debates to explore how race, faith, and identity became central questions in twentieth-century African American life.



They Heard Georgia Singing

They Heard Georgia Singing Author Zell Miller
ISBN-10 0865545049
Release 1996
Pages 342
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Georgia's music history is diverse in that it covers gospel singer Thomas Dorsey, soul singer James Brown, opera singer Jessye Norman, country singer Alan Jackson, folk singer Hedy West and symphony and choral conductors Robert Shaw and Yoel Levi. They Heard Georgia Singing provides brief musical biographies of the men and women who have made major contributions to Georgia musical history either as natives or as personalities within the context of Georgia music.



Children and Childhood in American Religions

Children and Childhood in American Religions Author Don S. Browning
ISBN-10 0813546958
Release 2009-02-16
Pages 224
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Whether First Communion or bar mitzvah, religious traditions play a central role in the lives of many American children. In this collection of essays, leading scholars reveal for the first time how various religions interpret, reconstruct, and mediate their traditions to help guide children and their parents in navigating the opportunities and challenges of American life. The book examines ten religions, among other topics: How the Catholic Church confronts the tension between its teachings about children and actual practic The Oglala Lakota's struggle to preserve their spiritual tradition The impact of modernity on Hinduism Only by discussing the unique challenges faced by all religions, and their followers, can we take the first step toward a greater understanding for all of us.



Public Religion and Urban Transformation

Public Religion and Urban Transformation Author Lowell W. Livezey
ISBN-10 9780814753217
Release 2000-05-01
Pages 364
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American cities are in the midst of fundamental changes. De-industrialization of large, aging cities has been enormously disruptive for urban communities, which are being increasingly fragmented. Though often overlooked, religious organizations are important actors, both culturally and politically in the restructuring metropolis. Public Religion and Urban Transformation provides a sweeping view of urban religion in response to these transformations. Drawing on a massive study of over seventy-five congregations in urban neighborhoods, this volume provides the most comprehensive picture available of urban places of worship-from mosques and gurdwaras to churches and synagogues-within one city. Revisiting the primary site of research for the early members of the Chicago School of urban sociology, the volume focuses on Chicago, which provides an exceptionally clear lens on the ways in which religious organizations both reflect and contribute to changes in American pluralism. From the churches of a Mexican American neighborhood and of the Black middle class to communities shared by Jews, Christians, Hindus, and Muslims and the rise of "megachurches," Public Religion and Urban Transformation illuminates the complex interactions among religion, urban structure, and social change at this extraordinary episode in the history of urban America.



The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture Author Bill C. Malone
ISBN-10 9781469616667
Release 2014-02-01
Pages 448
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Southern music has flourished as a meeting ground for the traditions of West African and European peoples in the region, leading to the evolution of various traditional folk genres, bluegrass, country, jazz, gospel, rock, blues, and southern hip-hop. This much-anticipated volume in The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture celebrates an essential element of southern life and makes available for the first time a stand-alone reference to the music and music makers of the American South. With nearly double the number of entries devoted to music in the original Encyclopedia, this volume includes 30 thematic essays, covering topics such as ragtime, zydeco, folk music festivals, minstrelsy, rockabilly, white and black gospel traditions, and southern rock. And it features 174 topical and biographical entries, focusing on artists and musical outlets. From Mahalia Jackson to R.E.M., from Doc Watson to OutKast, this volume considers a diverse array of topics, drawing on the best historical and contemporary scholarship on southern music. It is a book for all southerners and for all serious music lovers, wherever they live.



Boogaloo

Boogaloo Author Arthur Kempton
ISBN-10 0472030876
Release 2005
Pages 468
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An in-depth study of soul music, or rhythm-and-blues, explores the role of African Americans in the evolution of American contemporary popular music, discussing such topics as the conflicts between the sacred and profane in soul music, hip-hop, and the roles of four key figures in the movement--Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Cooke, Berry Gordy, and George Clinton. Reprint.