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To Rise in Darkness

To Rise in Darkness Author Aldo A. Lauria-Santiago
ISBN-10 9780822381242
Release 2009-01-01
Pages 396
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To Rise in Darkness offers a new perspective on a defining moment in modern Central American history. In January 1932 thousands of indigenous and ladino (non-Indian) rural laborers, provoked by electoral fraud and the repression of strikes, rose up and took control of several municipalities in central and western El Salvador. Within days the military and civilian militias retook the towns and executed thousands of people, most of whom were indigenous. This event, known as la Matanza (the massacre), has received relatively little scholarly attention. In To Rise in Darkness, Jeffrey L. Gould and Aldo A. Lauria-Santiago investigate memories of the massacre and its long-term cultural and political consequences. Gould conducted more than two hundred interviews with survivors of la Matanza and their descendants. He and Lauria-Santiago combine individual accounts with documentary sources from archives in El Salvador, Guatemala, Washington, London, and Moscow. They describe the political, economic, and cultural landscape of El Salvador during the 1920s and early 1930s, and offer a detailed narrative of the uprising and massacre. The authors challenge the prevailing idea that the Communist organizers of the uprising and the rural Indians who participated in it were two distinct groups. Gould and Lauria-Santiago demonstrate that many Communist militants were themselves rural Indians, some of whom had been union activists on the coffee plantations for several years prior to the rebellion. Moreover, by meticulously documenting local variations in class relations, ethnic identity, and political commitment, the authors show that those groups considered “Indian” in western El Salvador were far from homogeneous. The united revolutionary movement of January 1932 emerged out of significant cultural difference and conflict.



Explorer s Guide El Salvador

Explorer s Guide El Salvador Author Paige R. Penland
ISBN-10 9781581571141
Release 2010-10-04
Pages 288
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Long a destination for serious surfers, El Salvador remains the “undiscovered” destination in Central America, inexpensive to visit and rich in local color. In this new El Salvador guide you’ll find great information on the best places to stay, eat, and travel. And with a special surfing section and complete information on events, activities, and national parks, you’ll never be wanting for something to do.



Memory and the Future

Memory and the Future Author Yifat Gutman
ISBN-10 9780230292338
Release 2010-10-06
Pages 217
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For those who study memory, there is a nagging concern that memory studies are inherently backward-looking, and that memory itself hinders efforts to move forward. Unhinging memory from the past, this book brings together an interdisciplinary group of prominent scholars who bring the future into the study of memory.



Hearts and Minds

Hearts and Minds Author Hannah Gurman
ISBN-10 9781595588432
Release 2013-10-01
Pages 304
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The first book of its kind, Hearts and Minds is a scathing response to the grand narrative of U.S. counterinsurgency, in which warfare is defined not by military might alone but by winning the "hearts and minds" of civilians. Dormant as a tactic since the days of the Vietnam War, in 2006 the U.S. Army drafted a new field manual heralding the resurrection of counterinsurgency as a primary military engagement strategy; counterinsurgency campaigns followed in Iraq and Afghanistan, despite the fact that counterinsurgency had utterly failed to account for the actual lived experiences of the people whose hearts and minds America had sought to win. Drawing on leading thinkers in the field and using key examples from Malaya, the Philippines, Vietnam, El Salvador, Iraq, and Afghanistan, Hearts and Minds brings a long-overdue focus on the many civilians caught up in these conflicts. Both urgent and timely, this important book challenges the idea of a neat divide between insurgents and the populations from which they emerge—and should be required reading for anyone engaged in the most important contemporary debates over U.S. military policy.



Children of Facundo

Children of Facundo Author Ariel de la Fuente
ISBN-10 0822325969
Release 2000-11-15
Pages 249
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DIVCombines peasant studies and cultural history to revise the received wisdom on nineteenth-century Argentinian politics and aspects of the Argentinian state-formation process./div



Terror in the Land of the Holy Spirit

Terror in the Land of the Holy Spirit Author Virginia Garrard-Burnett
ISBN-10 9780195379648
Release 2010-01-15
Pages 269
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Between 1982 and 1983, in the name of anti-communism the military government of Guatemala prosecuted a scorched-earth campaign of terror against largely Mayan rural communities. Under the leadership of General Efrain Rios Montt, tens of thousands of people perished in what is now known as laviolencia, or 'the Mayan holocaust.' Rios Montt, Guatemala's president-by-coup was, and is, an outspokenly born-again Pentecostal Christian - a fact that would seem to be at odds with the atrocities that took place on his watch. Virginia Garrard-Burnett's book is the first in English to view theRios Montt era through the lens of history. Drawing on newly-available primary sources such as guerrilla documents, evangelical pamphlets, speech transcripts, and declassified US government records, she is able to provide a fine-grained picture of what happened during Rios Montt's rule. Looking backover Guatemalan history between 1954 and the late 1970s, she finds that three decades of war engendered an ideology of violence that cut across class, cultures, communities, religions, and even families. Many Guatemalans converted to Pentecostalism during this period, she says, because of theaffinity between these churches' apocalyptic message and the violence of their everyday reality. Examining the role of outside players and observers: The US government, evangelical groups, and the media, she contends that self-interest, willful ignorance, and distraction permitted the human rightstragedies within Guatemala to take place without challenge from the outside world.



Transition Cinema

Transition Cinema Author Jessica Stites Mor
ISBN-10 9780822977971
Release 2012
Pages 304
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In May of 1976, documentary filmmaker and proclaimed socialist Raymundo Gleyzer mysteriously disappeared in Buenos Aires. Like many political activists, Gleyzer was the target of a brutalizing military junta that had recently assumed power. Amazingly, within a few decades, leftist filmmakers would be celebrated as intellectual vanguards in this same city. In Transition Cinema, Jessica Stites Mor documents the critical role filmmakers, the film industry, and state regulators played in Argentina’s volatile transition to democracy. She shows how, during different regimes, the state moved to either inhibit or facilitate film production and its content, distribution, and exhibition. She also reveals the strategies the film industry employed to comply with, or circumvent these regulations. Stites Mor divides the transition period into three distinct generations, each defined by a major political event and the reactions to these events in film. The first generation began with the failed civil uprising in Córdoba in 1969, and ended with the 1976 military takeover. During military rule, repressive censorship spurred underground exhibitions, and allied filmmakers with the Peronist left and radical activists. The second generation arose after the return of civilian rule in 1983. Buenos Aires became the center for state-level cultural programs that included filmmakers in debates over human rights and collective memory campaigns. In 1989, a third generation of filmmaking emerged, with new genres such as cine piquetero (picketer cinema) that portrayed a variety of social movements and brought them into the public eye. By the new millennium, Argentine filmmakers had gained the attention and financial support of international humanitarian and film industry organizations. In this captivating study, Stites Mor examines how populist movements, political actors, filmmakers, government, and industry institutions all became deeply enmeshed in the project of Argentina’s transition cinema. She demonstrates how film emerged as the chronicler of political struggles in a dialogue with the past, present, and future, whose message transcended both cultural and national borders.



Cartographic Mexico

Cartographic Mexico Author Raymond B. Craib
ISBN-10 082233416X
Release 2004
Pages 300
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This vivid social history reveals the powerful role that cartographic projects such as exploration, surveying, and mapping played in the creation of modern Mexico in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Raymond B. Craib describes the varied and pervasive attempts by government officials to determine the lines and claims that would define the nation. These projects included the privatization of communal lands; the delineation and archiving of village, municipal, state, and national boundaries; and the determination of waterways and water rights. As Craib emphasizes, the everyday processes of these cartographic routines proved to be much more conflicted than is indicated by their end products: maps with unitary and smooth faades. Taking central Veracruz as a case in point, Craib shows how agrarian officials, military surveyors, and metropolitan geographers traversed "fugitive landscapes" of overlapping jurisdictions and use-rights, opaque tenure systems, confusing property regimes, ambiguous borders, and shifting place names. He draws on an array of sources--including maps, letters from campesinos, official reports, and surveyors' journals and correspondence--to trace the everyday, contested processes through which officials attempted to redefine and codify these landscapes in struggle with the villagers they encountered in the field. In the process, he demonstrates in meticulous detail how surveying and mapping were never mere technical procedures: they were--and remain to this day--profoundly social and political processes in which rural people, long ignored in the history of cartography, were actively involved.



Dignifying Argentina

Dignifying Argentina Author Eduardo Elena
ISBN-10 9780822977384
Release 2011-08
Pages 332
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During their term, Juan and Eva Perón (1946–1955) led the region's largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh vantage by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. Elena argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society. Winner of the 2013 Book Prize in the Social Sciences awarded by the Southern Cone Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association.



Metropolitan Migrants

Metropolitan Migrants Author Rubén Hernández-León
ISBN-10 9780520256743
Release 2008-09-02
Pages 258
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Challenging many common perceptions, this book is dedicated to understanding a major new phenomenon - the large number of skilled urban workers who are coming to America from Mexico's cities. Based on a ten-year study of one working-class neighbourhood in Monterrey, the book studies the forces that lead to Mexican emigration.



El Salvador Could Be Like That

El Salvador Could Be Like That Author Joseph B Frazier
ISBN-10 1937902099
Release 2013-04-01
Pages 230
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Drawing from personal on-the-ground experiences and over 400 submitted wire stories, Joseph Frazier reveals a forgotten war that was important for Latin America, US-Soviet history, and the everyday people of El Salvador. "Joseph Frazier's book brings all his expertise, compassion and flair to the deeply compelling story of that hidden war which cost 75,000 lives. His eye is extraordinary. He sees through the fog and disinformation of both sides, sees the war's political complexity, and makes us feel its human cost. And he gets its ironies-Kurt Vonnegut and Joseph Heller are somewhere smiling upon this account." - Journalist and filmmaker Mary Jo McConahay, author of National Geographic Book of the Month, Maya Roads: One Woman's Journey Among the People of the Rainforest. Joe Frazier, a longtime veteran of The Associated Press, covered the bloody civil war in El Salvador in the early 1980s. The conflict between the rightist U.S.-backed government forces and the revolutionary guerrillas was the last gasp of the U.S.-Soviet cold war and affected every level of Salvadoran society. A starkly divided country where a few wealthy landowners controlled the majority of the capital, El Salvador was ripe for revolution in the late 1970s. Many people were living without basic necessities, and many were living in fear. Deeply sympathetic to the ordinary people-of all political leanings-who suffered the most, Frazier exposes the daily horrors and injustices of this long, brutal war: death squads, disappearances, stolen children, food shortages, displacement, constant intimidation. Frazier calls upon his vast trove of articles written from the frontlines, interspersing the reporting of facts with personal stories-some funny, some tragic-and political commentary. Both broad in its sweep and intense in its focus on the daily lives of the war's victims, Frazier's book is an important contribution to the scholarship on this mostly forgotten conflict. He explores the war and the factors that contributed to it in the hopes that such horrors will not be repeated. From the author's dedication: This book is dedicated to the reporters, photographers, and journalists I worked with as we tried to make sense out of the tragic times that came to define much of Central America, especially tiny, bludgeoned El Salvador in the 1980s. The wars that brought us together are forgotten now. So are the lessons they should have taught us. This book is a reminder of both.



Remembering a Massacre in El Salvador

Remembering a Massacre in El Salvador Author Héctor Lindo-Fuentes
ISBN-10 0826336043
Release 2007
Pages 411
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"Remembering a Massacre in El Salvador examines national and international historical memories of the events of 1932 and the factors that determined those memories. It also analyzes Miguel Marmol, by Roque Dalton, a well-known and influential narrative of the 1932 Matanza and one of the most important texts in modern Salvadoran history. The authors employ an array of primary evidence, including the personal archive of Roque Dalton - made available for the first time by the Dalton family - to argue that a systematic look at rivaling memories of the Matanza reveals the close association between historical narratives and political action. The book is complemented by a valuable appendix of primary documents that reveal the evolving memories of these important events in 1932."--BOOK JACKET.



Salvador

Salvador Author Joan Didion
ISBN-10 9780679751830
Release 1994
Pages 108
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The author recounts her 1982 visit to El Salvador and describes the terror, fear and political repression that permeated the country



A Century of Revolution

A Century of Revolution Author Gilbert M. Joseph
ISBN-10 9780822392859
Release 2010-09-30
Pages 456
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Latin America experienced an epochal cycle of revolutionary upheavals and insurgencies during the twentieth century, from the Mexican Revolution of 1910 through the mobilizations and terror in Central America, the Southern Cone, and the Andes during the 1970s and 1980s. In his introduction to A Century of Revolution, Greg Grandin argues that the dynamics of political violence and terror in Latin America are so recognizable in their enforcement of domination, their generation and maintenance of social exclusion, and their propulsion of historical change, that historians have tended to take them for granted, leaving unexamined important questions regarding their form and meaning. The essays in this groundbreaking collection take up these questions, providing a sociologically and historically nuanced view of the ideological hardening and accelerated polarization that marked Latin America’s twentieth century. Attentive to the interplay among overlapping local, regional, national, and international fields of power, the contributors focus on the dialectical relations between revolutionary and counterrevolutionary processes and their unfolding in the context of U.S. hemispheric and global hegemony. Through their fine-grained analyses of events in Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, they suggest a framework for interpreting the experiential nature of political violence while also analyzing its historical causes and consequences. In so doing, they set a new agenda for the study of revolutionary change and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. Contributors Michelle Chase Jeffrey L. Gould Greg Grandin Lillian Guerra Forrest Hylton Gilbert M. Joseph Friedrich Katz Thomas Miller Klubock Neil Larsen Arno J. Mayer Carlota McAllister Jocelyn Olcott Gerardo Rénique Corey Robin Peter Winn



Families in War and Peace

Families in War and Peace Author Sarah C. Chambers
ISBN-10 9780822375562
Release 2015-04-29
Pages 304
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In Families in War and Peace Sarah C. Chambers places gender analysis and family politics at the center of Chile's struggle for independence and its subsequent state building. Linking the experiences of both prominent and more humble families to Chile's political and legal history, Chambers argues that matters such as marriage, custody, bloodlines, and inheritance were crucial to Chile's transition from colony to nation. She shows how men and women extended their familial roles to mobilize kin networks for political ends, both during and after the Chilean revolution. From the conflict's end in 1823 until the 1850s, the state adopted the rhetoric of paternal responsibility along with patriarchal authority, which became central to the state building process. Chilean authorities, Chambers argues, garnered legitimacy by enacting or enforcing paternalist laws on property restitution, military pensions, and family maintenance allowances, all of which provided for diverse groups of Chileans. By acting as the fathers of the nation, they aimed to reconcile the "greater Chilean family" and form a stable government and society.



Identity and Struggle at the Margins of the Nation state

Identity and Struggle at the Margins of the Nation state Author Aviva Chomsky
ISBN-10 0822322188
Release 1998
Pages 404
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A social history of Central America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean that illustrates the importance of workers’ actions in shaping national history.



Landscapes of Struggle

Landscapes of Struggle Author Aldo Lauria-Santiago
ISBN-10 9780822972549
Release 2004-05
Pages 326
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During the 1980s, El Salvador's violent civil war captured the world's attention. In the years since, the country has undergone dramatic changes. Landscapes of Struggle offers a broad, interdisciplinary assessment of El Salvador from the late nineteenth century to the present, focusing on the ways local politics have shaped the development of the nation. Proceeding chronologically, these essays-by historians, political scientists, sociologists, and anthropologists-explore the political, social, and cultural dynamics governing the Salvadoran experience, including the crucial roles of land, the military, and ethnicity; the effects of the civil war; and recent transformations, such as the growth of a large Salvadoran diaspora in the United States. Taken together, they provide a fully realized portrait of El Salvador's troublesome past, transformative present, and uncertain future.