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Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods Author Annette Lareau
ISBN-10 9780520949904
Release 2011-09-20
Pages 480
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Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.



Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods Author Annette Lareau
ISBN-10 9780520271425
Release 2011-08-02
Pages 461
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This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.



Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods Author Annette Lareau
ISBN-10 0520930479
Release 2003-09-11
Pages 343
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Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African-American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.



Still Connected

Still Connected Author Claude S. Fischer
ISBN-10 9781610447102
Release 2011-01-01
Pages 176
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National news reports periodically proclaim that American life is lonelier than ever, and new books on the subject with titles like Bowling Alone generate considerable anxiety about the declining quality of Americans’ social ties. Still Connected challenges such concerns by asking a simple yet significant question: have Americans’ bonds with family and friends changed since the 1970s, and, if so, how? Noted sociologist Claude Fischer examines long-term trends in family ties and friendships and paints an insightful and ultimately reassuring portrait of Americans’ personal relationships. Still Connected analyzes forty years of survey research to address whether and how Americans’ personal ties have changed—their involvement with relatives, the number of friends they have and their contacts with those friends, the amount of practical and emotional support they are able to count on, and how emotionally tied they feel to these relationships. The book shows that Americans today have fewer relatives than they did forty years ago and that formal gatherings have declined over the decades—at least partially as a result of later marriages and more women in the work force. Yet neither the overall quantity of personal relationships nor, more importantly, the quality of those relationships has diminished. Americans’ contact with relatives and friends, as well as their feelings of emotional connectedness, has changed relatively little since the 1970s. Although Americans are marrying later and single people feel lonely, few Americans report being socially isolated and the percentage who do has not really increased. Fischer maintains that this constancy testifies to the value Americans place on family and friends and to their willingness to adapt to changing circumstances in ways that sustain their social connections. For example, children now often have schedules as busy as their parents. Yet today’s parents spend more quality time with their children than parents did forty years ago—although less in the form of organized home activities and more in the form of accompanying them to play dates or sports activities. And those family meals at home that seem to be disappearing? While survey research shows that families dine at home together less often, it also shows that they dine out together more often. Americans are fascinated by the quality of their relationships with family and friends and whether these bonds fray or remain stable over time. With so many voices heralding the demise of personal relationships, it’s no wonder that confusion on this topic abounds. An engrossing and accessible social history, Still Connected brings a much-needed note of clarity to the discussion. Americans’ personal ties, this book assures us, remain strong.



Not so nuclear Families

Not so nuclear Families Author Karen V. Hansen
ISBN-10 0813535018
Release 2005-01-01
Pages 261
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Annotation How do working parents provide care and mobilize the help that they need? Karen V. Hansen investigates the lives of working parents and the informal networks they construct to help care for their children. The book concludes with a series of policy suggestions intended to improve the environment in which working families raise children.



Uncoupling

Uncoupling Author Diane Vaughan
ISBN-10 9780679730026
Release 1990
Pages 250
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Now in trade paperback, the ground-breaking and carefully documented book that shows how couples come apart.



Divided by Borders

Divided by Borders Author Joanna Dreby
ISBN-10 9780520945838
Release 2010-02-17
Pages 336
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Since 2000, approximately 440,000 Mexicans have migrated to the United States every year. Tens of thousands have left children behind in Mexico to do so. For these parents, migration is a sacrifice. What do parents expect to accomplish by dividing their families across borders? How do families manage when they are living apart? More importantly, do parents' relocations yield the intended results? Probing the experiences of migrant parents, children in Mexico, and their caregivers, Joanna Dreby offers an up-close and personal account of the lives of families divided by borders. What she finds is that the difficulties endured by transnational families make it nearly impossible for parents' sacrifices to result in the benefits they expect. Yet, paradoxically, these hardships reinforce family members' commitments to each other. A story both of adversity and the intensity of family ties, Divided by Borders is an engaging and insightful investigation of the ways Mexican families struggle and ultimately persevere in a global economy.



Family Communication

Family Communication Author Chris Segrin
ISBN-10 9781135159924
Release 2011-10-14
Pages 504
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Family Communication carefully examines state-of-the-art research and theories of family communication and family relationships. In addition to presenting cutting-edge research, it focuses on classic theories and research findings that have influenced and revolutionized the way scholars conceptualize family interaction. This text offers a thorough and up-to-date presentation of scientific research in family communication for both teachers and students of family communication as well as professionals who work with families. This second edition features: Chapters updated with the latest research, including over 2000 references. Material on understudied family relationships, such as extended family relationships and gay and lesbian relationships Recent research on understudied topics in family communication, including the influence of technology on mate selection, negotiating work and family stress, single parenting, cohabitation, elder abuse, forgiveness in marriage, and the links among communication, culture, and mental health. A revised chapter on parent-child communication, taking a lifespan perspective that helps organize the large body of research in this area. A new chapter devoted to extended family relationships, with special focus on grandparent-grandchild relationships, in-law relationships, and adult children and their parents. An expanded review of family conflict processes, especially in relation to decision making and power. A companion website provides chapter outlines, exam questions, and PowerPoint slides for students and instructors. Undergraduate readers should find the information easy to understand, while advanced readers, such as graduate students and professionals, will find it a useful reference to classic and contemporary research on family communication and relationships.



Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited

Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited Author Joseph Tobin
ISBN-10 9780226805054
Release 2009-08-01
Pages 280
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Published twenty years ago, the original Preschool in Three Cultures was a landmark in the study of education: a profoundly enlightening exploration of the different ways preschoolers are taught in China, Japan, and the United States. Here, lead author Joseph Tobin—along with new collaborators Yeh Hsueh and Mayumi Karasawa—revisits his original research to discover how two decades of globalization and sweeping social transformation have affected the way these three cultures educate and care for their youngest pupils. Putting their subjects’ responses into historical perspective, Tobin, Hsueh, and Karasawa analyze the pressures put on schools to evolve and to stay the same, discuss how the teachers adapt to these demands, and examine the patterns and processes of continuity and change in each country. Featuring nearly one hundred stills from the videotapes, Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited artfully and insightfully illustrates the surprising, illuminating, and at times entertaining experiences of four-year-olds—and their teachers—on both sides of the Pacific.



Race in the Schoolyard

Race in the Schoolyard Author Amanda E. Lewis
ISBN-10 0813532256
Release 2003
Pages 243
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Annotation An exploration of how race is explicitly and implicitly handled in school.



Child Health

Child Health Author Ryan Coller
ISBN-10 9780199309375
Release 2015-09-17
Pages 368
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Children in the U.S. are not faring well. Despite major advances in public health, hygiene, and treatment for acute infections, child health outcomes in the U.S. are among the bottom for developed countries. As we enter the third decade of a child obesity epidemic, children born in the last ten years are now likely to have a shorter lifespan than their parents. Coupled with an epidemic of childhood mental health issues -- many of them unaddressed due to stigma or lack of recognition -- plus the impacts of gun violence, poverty, and youth incarceration contribute to an overall culture that fails to prioritize the health and welfare of our youngest members of society. Child Health: A Population Perspective examines both the history of child health and the three dynamics that most define it: the principles and dynamics between children, families, and communities; social determinants of health; and life course health development. With both theoretical grounding and illustrative case studies, this book provides a core framework for students in maternal and child health to better understand the issues facing children today -- and how to serve them best.



Tolstoy as Teacher

Tolstoy as Teacher Author graf Leo Tolstoy
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105029060196
Release 2000-01-01
Pages 246
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In the years before he wrote War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy founded and ran a school on his estate at Yasanya Polyana. Brimming with progressive and sometimes radical ideas on schooling, Tolstoy undertook to teach the peasant children many subjects-including imaginative writing-and wrote about what he learned. This is a book for anyone who cares about education.



Rac e ing to Class

Rac e ing to Class Author Richard Milner IV
ISBN-10 1612507867
Release 2015-04-01
Pages 232
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The Cage-Busting Teacher adopts the logic of Cage-Busting Leadership and applies it to the challenges and opportunities of classroom teachers. Based on hundreds of interviews, it recommends concrete solutions and ways to put them in place.



Patterns of Narrative Discourse

Patterns of Narrative Discourse Author Allyssa McCabe
ISBN-10 UOM:39015056235404
Release 2003
Pages 212
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Patterns of Narrative Discourse: A Multicultural, Life Span Approach educates professionals about the features of narrative discourse from a multicultural perspective. The authors seek to prevent misdiagnoses of cultural differences as deficits. The importance of narratives for children and adults is presented with respect to literacy, education, law and medicine. Narratives from children with typical and impaired discourse development are described regarding the following cultures: European North American, African American, Spanish-speaking communities, and Asian Americans. Adult narratives are also presented from speakers with typical and impaired discourse from different cultural backgrounds. Assessment, intervention and educational considerations that take into account multicultural backgrounds are presented. This book is intended for speech-language pathologists, early childhood specialists, elementary and high school educators, as well as students in these disciplines. A must have resource for those dealing with typical and impaired language development! Narratives spoken by children from different cultures with typical impaired language development are included in separate chapters. Narratives spoken by adults with typical and impaired language behavior Narrative Assessment Profiles throughout the book enable the reader to analyze adult and child narratives from a multidimensional perspective that considers the cultural background of the speaker.



Coming of Age in the Other America

Coming of Age in the Other America Author Stefanie DeLuca
ISBN-10 9781610448581
Release 2016-04-19
Pages 318
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Recent research on inequality and poverty has shown that those born into low-income families, especially African Americans, still have difficulty entering the middle class, in part because of the disadvantages they experience living in more dangerous neighborhoods, going to inferior public schools, and persistent racial inequality. Coming of Age in the Other America shows that despite overwhelming odds, some disadvantaged urban youth do achieve upward mobility. Drawing from ten years of fieldwork with parents and children who resided in Baltimore public housing, sociologists Stefanie DeLuca, Susan Clampet-Lundquist, and Kathryn Edin highlight the remarkable resiliency of some of the youth who hailed from the nation’s poorest neighborhoods and show how the right public policies might help break the cycle of disadvantage. Coming of Age in the Other America illuminates the profound effects of neighborhoods on impoverished families. The authors conducted in-depth interviews and fieldwork with 150 young adults, and found that those who had been able to move to better neighborhoods—either as part of the Moving to Opportunity program or by other means—achieved much higher rates of high school completion and college enrollment than their parents. About half the youth surveyed reported being motivated by an “identity project”—or a strong passion such as music, art, or a dream job—to finish school and build a career. Yet the authors also found troubling evidence that some of the most promising young adults often fell short of their goals and remained mired in poverty. Factors such as neighborhood violence and family trauma put these youth on expedited paths to adulthood, forcing them to shorten or end their schooling and find jobs much earlier than their middle-class counterparts. Weak labor markets and subpar postsecondary educational institutions, including exploitative for-profit trade schools and under-funded community colleges, saddle some young adults with debt and trap them in low-wage jobs. A third of the youth surveyed—particularly those who had not developed identity projects—were neither employed nor in school. To address these barriers to success, the authors recommend initiatives that help transform poor neighborhoods and provide institutional support for the identity projects that motivate youth to stay in school. They propose increased regulation of for-profit schools and increased college resources for low-income high school students. Coming of Age in the Other America presents a sensitive, nuanced account of how a generation of ambitious but underprivileged young Baltimoreans has struggled to succeed. It both challenges long-held myths about inner-city youth and shows how the process of “social reproduction”—where children end up stuck in the same place as their parents—is far from inevitable.



Social Class

Social Class Author Annette Lareau
ISBN-10 9781610447256
Release 2008-07-10
Pages 400
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Class differences permeate the neighborhoods, classrooms, and workplaces where we lead our daily lives. But little is known about how class really works, and its importance is often downplayed or denied. In this important new volume, leading sociologists systematically examine how social class operates in the United States today. Social Class argues against the view that we are becoming a classless society. The authors show instead the decisive ways social class matters—from how long people live, to how they raise their children, to how they vote. The distinguished contributors to Social Class examine how class works in a variety of domains including politics, health, education, gender, and the family. Michael Hout shows that class membership remains an integral part of identity in the U.S.—in two large national surveys, over 97 percent of Americans, when prompted, identify themselves with a particular class. Dalton Conley identifies an intangible but crucial source of class difference that he calls the “opportunity horizon”—children form aspirations based on what they have seen is possible. The best predictor of earning a college degree isn’t race, income, or even parental occupation—it is, rather, the level of education that one’s parents achieved. Annette Lareau and Elliot Weininger find that parental involvement in the college application process, which significantly contributes to student success, is overwhelmingly a middle-class phenomenon. David Grusky and Kim Weeden introduce a new model for measuring inequality that allows researchers to assess not just the extent of inequality, but also whether it is taking on a more polarized, class-based form. John Goldthorpe and Michelle Jackson examine the academic careers of students in three social classes and find that poorly performing students from high-status families do much better in many instances than talented students from less-advantaged families. Erik Olin Wright critically assesses the emphasis on individual life chances in many studies of class and calls for a more structural conception of class. In an epilogue, journalists Ray Suarez, Janny Scott, and Roger Hodge reflect on the media’s failure to report hardening class lines in the United States, even when images on the nightly news—such as those involving health, crime, or immigration—are profoundly shaped by issues of class. Until now, class scholarship has been highly specialized, with researchers working on only one part of a larger puzzle. Social Class gathers the most current research in one volume, and persuasively illustrates that class remains a powerful force in American society.



The child and society

The child and society Author Frederick Elkin
ISBN-10 UVA:X000559371
Release 1978-03-01
Pages 299
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The child and society has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The child and society also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The child and society book for free.