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Veiled Empire

Veiled Empire Author Douglas Northrop
ISBN-10 9781501702969
Release 2016-02-04
Pages 416
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Drawing on extensive research in the archives of Russia and Uzbekistan, Douglas Northrop here reconstructs the turbulent history of a Soviet campaign that sought to end the seclusion of Muslim women. In Uzbekistan it focused above all on a massive effort to eliminate the heavy horsehair-and-cotton veils worn by many women and girls. This campaign against the veil was, in Northrop's view, emblematic of the larger Soviet attempt to bring the proletarian revolution to Muslim Central Asia, a region Bolsheviks saw as primitive and backward. The Soviets focused on women and the family in an effort to forge a new, "liberated" social order. This unveiling campaign, however, took place in the context of a half-century of Russian colonization and the long-standing suspicion of rural Muslim peasants toward an urban, colonial state. Widespread resistance to the idea of unveiling quickly appeared and developed into a broader anti-Soviet animosity among Uzbeks of both sexes. Over the next quarter-century a bitter and often violent confrontation ensued, with battles being waged over indigenous practices of veiling and seclusion. New local and national identities coalesced around these very practices that had been placed under attack. Veils became powerful anticolonial symbols for the Uzbek nation as well as important markers of Muslim propriety. Bolshevik leaders, who had seen this campaign as an excellent way to enlist allies while proving their own European credentials as enlightened reformers, thus inadvertently strengthened the seclusion of Uzbek women—precisely the reverse of what they set out to do. Northrop's fascinating and evocative book shows both the fluidity of Central Asian cultural practices and the real limits that existed on Stalinist authority, even during the ostensibly totalitarian 1930s.



Veiled Empire

Veiled Empire Author Douglas Taylor Northrop
ISBN-10 0801439442
Release 2004
Pages 392
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Drawing on research in Russian and Uzbekistani archives, the author reconstructs the turbulent history of a Soviet campaign that sought to end the seclusion of Muslim women. He shows it as emblematic of the larger Soviet attempt to bring the proletarian revolution to Muslim Central Asia.



Veiled Empire

Veiled Empire Author Douglas Taylor Northrop
ISBN-10 0801488915
Release 2004
Pages 392
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Drawing on research in Russian and Uzbekistani archives, the author reconstructs the turbulent history of a Soviet campaign that sought to end the seclusion of Muslim women. He shows it as emblematic of the larger Soviet attempt to bring the proletarian revolution to Muslim Central Asia.



Empire of Nations

Empire of Nations Author Francine Hirsch
ISBN-10 9780801455933
Release 2014-10-03
Pages 392
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When the Bolsheviks seized power in 1917, they set themselves the task of building socialism in the vast landscape of the former Russian Empire, a territory populated by hundreds of different peoples belonging to a multitude of linguistic, religious, and ethnic groups. Before 1917, the Bolsheviks had called for the national self-determination of all peoples and had condemned all forms of colonization as exploitative. After attaining power, however, they began to express concern that it would not be possible for Soviet Russia to survive without the cotton of Turkestan and the oil of the Caucasus. In an effort to reconcile their anti-imperialist position with their desire to hold on to as much territory as possible, the Bolsheviks integrated the national idea into the administrative-territorial structure of the new Soviet state. In Empire of Nations, Francine Hirsch examines the ways in which former imperial ethnographers and local elites provided the Bolsheviks with ethnographic knowledge that shaped the very formation of the new Soviet Union. The ethnographers—who drew inspiration from the Western European colonial context—produced all-union censuses, assisted government commissions charged with delimiting the USSR's internal borders, led expeditions to study "the human being as a productive force," and created ethnographic exhibits about the "Peoples of the USSR." In the 1930s, they would lead the Soviet campaign against Nazi race theories . Hirsch illuminates the pervasive tension between the colonial-economic and ethnographic definitions of Soviet territory; this tension informed Soviet social, economic, and administrative structures. A major contribution to the history of Russia and the Soviet Union, Empire of Nations also offers new insights into the connection between ethnography and empire.



Empire

Empire Author Dominic Lieven
ISBN-10 0300097263
Release 2002
Pages 486
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Focusing on the Tsarist and Soviet empires of Russia, Lieven reveals the nature and meaning of all empires throughout history. He examines factors that mold the shape of the empires, including geography and culture, and compares the Russian empires with other imperial states, from ancient China and Rome to the present-day United States. Illustrations.



An Imperial World

An Imperial World Author Douglas Northrop
ISBN-10 9781315508153
Release 2016-09-13
Pages 240
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This text helps students understand world history by focusing on an issue that has profoundly shaped the modern world order: the establishment and collapse of global empires since 1750. An Imperial World uses a combination of primary documents and analytical essays, both tightly focused around four case studies: India, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. It examines the historical development of colonial systems and shows their enormous role in shaping the modern world order. It is meant to be thematic and suggestive, offering arguments and information to serve as a starting point for discussion and exploration.



A Companion to World History

A Companion to World History Author Douglas Northrop
ISBN-10 9781118977514
Release 2014-12-15
Pages 640
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A Companion to World History presents over 30 essays from an international group of historians that both identify continuing areas of contention, disagreement, and divergence in world and global history, and point to directions for further debate. Features a diverse cast of contributors that include established world historians and emerging scholars Explores a wide range of topics and themes, including and the practice of world history, key ideas of world historians, the teaching of world history and how it has drawn upon and challenged "traditional" teaching approaches, and global approaches to writing world history Places an emphasis on non-Anglophone approaches to the topic Considers issues of both scholarship and pedagogy on a transnational, interregional, and world/global scale



Uprooted

Uprooted Author Gregor Thum
ISBN-10 1400839963
Release 2011-08-08
Pages 552
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With the stroke of a pen at the Potsdam Conference following the Allied victory in 1945, Breslau, the largest German city east of Berlin, became the Polish city of Wroclaw. Its more than six hundred thousand inhabitants--almost all of them ethnic Germans--were expelled and replaced by Polish settlers from all parts of prewar Poland. Uprooted examines the long-term psychological and cultural consequences of forced migration in twentieth-century Europe through the experiences of Wroclaw's Polish inhabitants. In this pioneering work, Gregor Thum tells the story of how the city's new Polish settlers found themselves in a place that was not only unfamiliar to them but outright repellent given Wroclaw's Prussian-German appearance and the enormous scope of wartime destruction. The immediate consequences were an unstable society, an extremely high crime rate, rapid dilapidation of the building stock, and economic stagnation. This changed only after the city's authorities and a new intellectual elite provided Wroclaw with a Polish founding myth and reshaped the city's appearance to fit the postwar legend that it was an age-old Polish city. Thum also shows how the end of the Cold War and Poland's democratization triggered a public debate about Wroclaw's "amputated memory." Rediscovering the German past, Wroclaw's Poles reinvented their city for the second time since World War II. Uprooted traces the complex historical process by which Wroclaw's new inhabitants revitalized their city and made it their own.



American Empire

American Empire Author A. G. Hopkins
ISBN-10 9781400888351
Release 2018-02-20
Pages 960
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A new history of the United States that turns American exceptionalism on its head American Empire is a panoramic work of scholarship that presents a bold new global perspective on the history of the United States. Drawing on his expertise in economic history and the imperial histories of Britain and Europe, A. G. Hopkins takes readers from the colonial era to today to show how, far from diverging, the United States and Western Europe followed similar trajectories throughout this long period, and how America’s dependency on Britain and Europe extended much later into the nineteenth century than previously understood. In a sweeping narrative spanning three centuries, Hopkins describes how the revolt of the mainland colonies was the product of a crisis that afflicted the imperial states of Europe generally, and how the history of the American republic between 1783 and 1865 was a response not to the termination of British influence but to its continued expansion. He traces how the creation of a U.S. industrial nation-state after the Civil War paralleled developments in Western Europe, fostered similar destabilizing influences, and found an outlet in imperialism through the acquisition of an insular empire in the Caribbean and Pacific. The period of colonial rule that followed reflected the history of the European empires in its ideological justifications, economic relations, and administrative principles. After 1945, a profound shift in the character of globalization brought the age of the great territorial empires to an end. American Empire goes beyond the myth of American exceptionalism to place the United States within the wider context of the global historical forces that shaped the Western empires and the world.



Cold Peace

Cold Peace Author Yoram Gorlizki
ISBN-10 9780195304206
Release 2005
Pages 248
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Based on previously unavailable archival sources, this award-winning book examines the least understood phase of Stalin's rule through the despot's relations with his closest colleagues.



Fashioned to Reign

Fashioned to Reign Author Kris Vallotton
ISBN-10 9781441262288
Release 2013-08-15
Pages 256
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It's Time for a Revolution In the Garden, woman was taken out of man to stand by his side and co-reign with him. But Satan's schemes have robbed women of their rightful identity, disempowering and defacing them. The world aches for God's original partnership to be brought into balance once more--and it can be. Join Kris Vallotton for an extraordinary journey of eye-opening insight, including • God's true plan and purpose for women • Jesus' radical teachings and care for women • men's important role in restoring women • the true meaning of difficult Bible passages about women • examples of women in leadership as God intended God fashioned women to reign alongside men. Jesus set women free to be beautiful and powerful. It's time for us, as daughters and sons of the King, to rule together in glory again. Will you join the revolution? "We have failed to realize that Jesus founded the women's liberation movement more than two thousand years ago. Isn't it high time His Church led the revolution?"--Kris Vallotton "Off the charts. Worthy to be read and studied by all. You won't be able to put it down."--Patricia King, founder, XP Ministries "Read, weigh and embrace the spirit, truth and heartbeat of this book. This biblical approach rightly addresses unright arguments of strained interpretations. Such balance and beauty make sense and offer wisdom. I say, 'Amen!'"--Pastor Jack Hayford, chancellor, The King's University, Dallas/Los Angeles "This profound work is a must-read for men and women alike; it has the potential to instill courage in the hearts of men and give women permission to dream again."--Bill Johnson, senior leader, Bethel Church, Redding, California; author, The Essential Guide to Healing and When Heaven Invades Earth "Finally, a biblical perspective that encourages women to remain themselves and still take their God-given places of leadership."--Stacey Campbell, author, Praying the Bible; co-founding pastor, New Life Church, Kelowna, British Columbia "This compelling work will elevate your awareness, challenge some presuppositions and invite you to grow in the grace of the Lord Jesus."--Dr. Mark J. Chironna, Church On The Living Edge, Mark Chironna Ministries, Orlando, Florida "This must-read will empower you to regain your identity that Satan stole and live the life God created you to live."--Cynthia Brazelton, pastor, Victory Christian Ministries International "I deeply enjoyed diving into the Bible with Kris as my guide to find out what God really says about men and women. It has enhanced my understanding of who I am as a woman and inspires me to instill that in the young women around me. This book is about truth and therefore would be great written by anyone. However, I realized that the fact that it was written by a man, and it is a man calling me into my divine design, brought a deeper level of healing than I'd anticipated and sent me on a journey digging deeper into God's heart. I recommend it for all!" --Revival Magazine "Fashioned to Reign considers the everlasting deception Christians face regarding women's role and purpose: a deception fostered by evil and which is not of God's plan. The disempowerment of women was the devil's idea - and God's true plan for women is very different. Woman was, in fact, designed to stand by man's side and reign with him, not under him - and Fashioned to Reign covers God's ultimate intention for women. Packed with scripture and information throughout, Fashioned to Reign is a powerful analysis perfect for any Christian collection." --Midwest Book Review



Central Asia in World History

Central Asia in World History Author S.A.M. Adshead
ISBN-10 9781349226245
Release 2016-07-27
Pages 291
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This is a study of Central Asian history from Chinggis to the present, with reference to relations with China, Russia, India and Western Europe and to wider themes of world history. An introductory chapter defines Central Asia in time, place and ecology. The following chapters relate Central Asian history to the eight world institutions, whose development, it is argued, constitute world history in the proper sense.



Bolshevik Culture

Bolshevik Culture Author Abbott Gleason
ISBN-10 0253205131
Release 1985
Pages 304
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In the tumultuous years after the revolution of 1917, the traditional cutlure of Imperial Russia was both destroyed and preserved, as a new Soviet culture began to take shape. This book focuses on the interaction between the emerging political and cultural policies of the Soviet regime and the deeply held traditional values of the worker and peasant masses.



The Awakening of the Soviet Union

The Awakening of the Soviet Union Author Geoffrey A. Hosking
ISBN-10 0674055519
Release 1991
Pages 246
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Discusses the background behind the sweeping reforms in the Soviet Union, describes issues that must still be resolved, and suggests future directions for change



The Surrogate Proletariat

The Surrogate Proletariat Author Gregory J. Massell
ISBN-10 9781400870295
Release 2015-03-08
Pages 492
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The attempted modernization of Central Asia by the central Soviet government in the 1920's was a dramatic confrontation between radical, determined, authoritarian communists and a cluster of traditional Moslem societies based on kinship, custom, and religion. The Soviet authorities were determined to undermine the traditional social order through the destruction of existing family structures and worked to achieve this aspect of revolution through the mobilization of women. Gregory J. Massell's study of the interaction between central power and local traditions concentrates on the development of female roles in revolutionary modernization. Women in Moslem societies were segregated, exploited, and degraded; they were, therefore, a structural weak point in the traditional order—a surrogate proletariat. Through this potentially subversive group, it was believed, intense conflicts could be generated within society which would lead to its disintegration and subsequent reconstitution. The first part of the book isolates the trends that made Central Asia vulnerable to outside intervention, and examines the factors that impelled the communist elites to turn to Moslem women as potential revolutionary allies. In the second part, Professor Massed analyzes Soviet perceptions of female inferiority and of the revolutionary potential of Moslem women. Part Three is an account of specific Soviet actions based on these assumptions. The fourth part of the book deals with the variety of responses these actions evoked. Originally published in 1974. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.



A Biography of No Place

A Biography of No Place Author Kate BROWN
ISBN-10 9780674028937
Release 2009-06-30
Pages 322
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This is a biography of a borderland between Russia and Poland, a region where, in 1925, people identified as Poles, Germans, Jews, Ukrainians, and Russians lived side by side. Over the next three decades, this mosaic of cultures was modernized and homogenized out of existence by the ruling might of the Soviet Union, then Nazi Germany, and finally, Polish and Ukrainian nationalism. By the 1950s, this "no place" emerged as a Ukrainian heartland, and the fertile mix of peoples that defined the region was destroyed. Brown's study is grounded in the life of the village and shtetl, in the personalities and small histories of everyday life in this area. In impressive detail, she documents how these regimes, bureaucratically and then violently, separated, named, and regimented this intricate community into distinct ethnic groups. Drawing on recently opened archives, ethnography, and oral interviews that were unavailable a decade ago, A Biography of No Place reveals Stalinist and Nazi history from the perspective of the remote borderlands, thus bringing the periphery to the center of history. We are given, in short, an intimate portrait of the ethnic purification that has marked all of Europe, as well as a glimpse at the margins of twentieth-century "progress." Table of Contents: Glossary Introduction 1. Inventory 2. Ghosts in the Bathhouse 3. Moving Pictures 4. The Power to Name 5. A Diary of Deportation 6. The Great Purges and the Rights of Man 7. Deportee into Colonizer 8. Racial Hierarchies Epilogue: Shifting Borders, Shifting Identities Notes Archival Sources Acknowledgments Index This is a biography of a borderland between Russia and Poland, a region where, in 1925, people identified as Poles, Germans, Jews, Ukrainians, and Russians lived side by side. Over the next three decades, this mosaic of cultures was modernized and homogenized out of existence by the ruling might of the Soviet Union, then Nazi Germany, and finally, Polish and Ukrainian nationalism. By the 1950s, this "no place" emerged as a Ukrainian heartland, and the fertile mix of peoples that defined the region was destroyed. Brown's study is grounded in the life of the village and shtetl, in the personalities and small histories of everyday life in this area. In impressive detail, she documents how these regimes, bureaucratically and then violently, separated, named, and regimented this intricate community into distinct ethnic groups. Drawing on recently opened archives, ethnography, and oral interviews that were unavailable a decade ago, A Biography of No Place reveals Stalinist and Nazi history from the perspective of the remote borderlands, thus bringing the periphery to the center of history. Brown argues that repressive national policies grew not out of chauvinist or racist ideas, but the very instruments of modern governance - the census, map, and progressive social programs - first employed by Bolshevik reformers in the western borderlands. We are given, in short, an intimate portrait of the ethnic purification that has marked all of Europe, as well as a glimpse at the margins of twentieth century "progress." Kate Brown is Assistant Professor of History at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. A Biography of No Place is one of the most original and imaginative works of history to emerge in the western literature on the former Soviet Union in the last ten years. Historiographically fearless, Kate Brown writes with elegance and force, turning this history of a lost, but culturally rich borderland into a compelling narrative that serves as a microcosm for understanding nation and state in the Twentieth Century. With compassion and respect for the diverse people who inhabited this margin of territory between Russia and Poland, Kate Brown restores the voices, memories, and humanity of a people lost. --Lynne Viola, Professor of History, University of Toronto Samuel Butler and Kate Brown have something in common. Both have written about Erewhon with imagination and flair. I was captivated by the courage and enterprise behind this book. Is there a way to write a history of events that do not make rational sense? Kate Brown asks. She proceeds to give us a stunning answer. --Modris Eksteins, author of Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age Kate Brown tells the story of how succeeding regimes transformed a onetime multiethnic borderland into a far more ethnically homogeneous region through their often murderous imperialist and nationalist projects. She writes evocatively of the inhabitants' frequently challenged identities and livelihoods and gives voice to their aspirations and laments, including Poles, Ukrainians, Germans, Jews, and Russians. A Biography of No Place is a provocative meditation on the meanings of periphery and center in the writing of history. --Mark von Hagen, Professor of History, Columbia University



The New Woman in Uzbekistan

The New Woman in Uzbekistan Author Marianne Kamp
ISBN-10 9780295802473
Release 2011-10-01
Pages 320
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Winner of the Association of Women in Slavic Studies Heldt Prize Winner of the Central Eurasian Studies Society History and Humanities Book Award Honorable mention for the W. Bruce Lincoln Prize Book Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS) This groundbreaking work in women's history explores the lives of Uzbek women, in their own voices and words, before and after the Russian Revolution of 1917. Drawing upon their oral histories and writings, Marianne Kamp reexamines the Soviet Hujum, the 1927 campaign in Soviet Central Asia to encourage mass unveiling as a path to social and intellectual "liberation." This engaging examination of changing Uzbek ideas about women in the early twentieth century reveals the complexities of a volatile time: why some Uzbek women chose to unveil, why many were forcibly unveiled, why a campaign for unveiling triggered massive violence against women, and how the national memory of this pivotal event remains contested today.