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War of Numbers

War of Numbers Author Sam Adams
ISBN-10 9781586422028
Release 2012-03-13
Pages 251
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Sam Adams loved intelligence work, and that enthusiasm shines throughout this memoir of his years with the Central Intelligence Agency. His career was dominated by an epic struggle over Vietnam -- over military attempts to hide the true size of the enemy forces there, and over the integrity of the intelligence process. Adams's insistence on telling the truth caused an ungodly ruckus in both Washington and Saigon at the time, and years later, after the CIA had threatened to fire him (on thirteen occasions!) and he had quit the agency in disgust, Adams brought his story back up to the surface more loudly than ever in a CBS television documentary which eventually resulted in a notorious trial on libel charges brought by General William Westmoreland. After leaving the CIA, Adams sat down to write an account of his life at the agency. There is nothing else quite like the story he tells. From the Trade Paperback edition.



Who the Hell are We Fighting

Who the Hell are We Fighting Author C. Michael Hiam
ISBN-10 UOM:39015064871554
Release 2006
Pages 326
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It was an enigma of the Vietnam War: American troops kept killing the Viet Cong – and were being killed in the process – and yet the Viet Cong's ranks continued to grow. When one man – CIA analyst Sam Adams – uncovered documents suggesting a Viet Cong army more than twice as numerous as previously reckoned, another war erupted, this time within the ranks of America's intelligence community. This clandestine conflict, which burst into public view during the acrimonious lawsuit Westmoreland v. CBS, involved the highest levels of the U.S. government. The central issue in the trial, as in the war itself, was the calamitous failure of our intelligence agencies to ascertain the strength of the Viet Cong and get that information to our troops in a timely fashion. The legacy of this failure – whether due to institutional inertia, misguided politics, or individual hubris – haunts our nation. And Sam Adams’ tireless crusade for “honest intelligence” resonates strongly today. To detractors like Richard Helms, Adams was an obsessive zealot; to others, he was a patriot of rare integrity and moral courage. Adams was the driving force behind the CBS ninety-minute documentary The Uncounted Enemy, produced by George Crile and hosted by Mike Wallace. Westmoreland brought a lawsuit seeking $120 million in damages against Adams and Wallace in what headlines around the country trumpeted as the libel trial of the century. Westmoreland dropped his suit before the case could be sent to the jury. Who the Hell Are We Fighting? is the first serious narrative history of Adams' controversial discovery of the Vietnam "numbers gap." Hiam's book is a timeless, cautionary tale that combines the best elements of biography, military history, and current affairs.



Special Agent Vietnam

Special Agent  Vietnam Author Douglass H. Hubbard
ISBN-10 WISC:89082520610
Release 2006
Pages 269
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In Special Agent, Vietnam, Douglass H. Hubbard, Jr., relates the story of a highly dedicated and professional group of men who served voluntarily as officers, enlisted men, and civilian special agents of the Office of Naval Intelligence in Vietnam. Through Hubbard’s eyes--he served three consecutive tours as one of about two dozen civilian agents--the reader enters the clandestine and often dangerous world of counterespionage and crime, all amid the sights, sounds, and smells of the Vietnam War. Civilian special agents, despite their rather uncertain combat status as civilians, left secure stateside jobs and families behind, donned military uniforms, and carried weapons. They lived and worked in the field with sailors and Marines. They shared the same dangers and discomforts as military personnel, and--often in cooperation with their Vietnamese counterparts--supplied the naval services with counterintelligence and criminal investigative support. From communist infiltrators and fragging incidents to the murder of a visiting singer, Hubbard skillfully portrays the underlying chaos of a tour in Vietnam. Special Agent, Vietnamis the only book that addresses this aspect of the Vietnam War. It will appeal not only to those with an interest in the U.S. presence in wartime Vietnam, but also to those interested generally in military history, intelligence, counterintelligence, and criminal investigation.



Dispatches

Dispatches Author Michael Herr
ISBN-10 9780307814166
Release 2011-11-30
Pages 272
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"The best book to have been written about the Vietnam War" (The New York Times Book Review); an instant classic straight from the front lines. From its terrifying opening pages to its final eloquent words, Dispatches makes us see, in unforgettable and unflinching detail, the chaos and fervor of the war and the surreal insanity of life in that singular combat zone. Michael Herr’s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time. Dispatches is among the most blistering and compassionate accounts of war in our literature.



Slow Burn

Slow Burn Author Orrin DeForest
ISBN-10 0671739972
Release 1991-12-01
Pages 352
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In Vietnam, Orrin DeForest was a legendary CIA man who put together an unmatched network of spies, counterspies, defectors, and informants to penetrate the inner workings of the Vietcong. This fascinating account exposes the American intelligence establishment's shocking failures in Southeast Asia, and more. "Hard-hitting memoirs from an American spymaster".--Kirkus.



A Century of Media a Century of War

A Century of Media  a Century of War Author Robin Andersen
ISBN-10 0820478938
Release 2006
Pages 350
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Textbook



None So Blind

None So Blind Author George W. Allen
ISBN-10 UOM:39015053112937
Release 2001-01-01
Pages 296
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A former Army intelligence analyst takes readers inside the effort to understand the enemy during the Vietnam War, revealing the blunders and abuses of America's military intelligence aparatus.



Lessons in Disaster

Lessons in Disaster Author Gordon M. Goldstein
ISBN-10 9781466852112
Release 2013-09-03
Pages 320
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A revelatory look at the decisions that led to the U.S. involvement in Vietnam, drawing on the insights and reassessments of one of the war's architects "I had a part in a great failure. I made mistakes of perception, recommendation and execution. If I have learned anything I should share it." These are not words that Americans ever expected to hear from McGeorge Bundy, the national security adviser to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. But in the last years of his life, Bundy—the only principal architect of Vietnam strategy to have maintained his public silence—decided to revisit the decisions that had led to war and to look anew at the role he played. He enlisted the collaboration of the political scientist Gordon M. Goldstein, and together they explored what happened and what might have been. With Bundy's death in 1996, that manuscript could not be completed, but Goldstein has built on their collaboration in an original and provocative work of presidential history that distills the essential lessons of America's involvement in Vietnam. Drawing on Goldstein's prodigious research as well as the interviews and analysis he conducted with Bundy, Lessons in Disaster is a historical tour de force on the uses and misuses of American power. And in our own era, in the wake of presidential decisions that propelled the United States into another war under dubious pretexts, these lessons offer instructive guidance that we must heed if we are not to repeat the mistakes of the past.



Spymaster

Spymaster Author Oleg Kalugin
ISBN-10 9780465014453
Release 2009-03-03
Pages 480
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Oleg Kalugin oversaw the work of American spies, matched wits with the CIA, and became one of the youngest generals in KGB history. Even so, he grew increasingly disillusioned with the Soviet system. In 1990, he went public, exposing the intelligence agencyÕs shadowy methods. Revised and updated in the light of the KGBÕs enduring presence in Russian politics, Spymaster is KaluginÕs impressively illuminating memoir of the final years of the Soviet Union.



Chinese Intelligence Operations

Chinese Intelligence Operations Author Nicholas Eftimiades
ISBN-10 9781135240172
Release 2017-07-28
Pages 190
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Nicholas Eftimiades examines the infiltration of Chinese espionage agents into foreign governments and private businesses. He specifically addresses the human source in intelligence operations, and how these tactics fit into the conduct of internal and foreigh affairs in China.



The Art of Intelligence

The Art of Intelligence Author Henry A. Crumpton
ISBN-10 9780143123378
Release 2013
Pages 338
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A counterterrorism spy describes his leadership of the campaign that routed al Qaeda and the Taliban in the weeks after the September 11 attacks, offering insight into the ways in which the Afghanistan campaign changed American warfare.



The Assault on Intelligence

The Assault on Intelligence Author Michael V. Hayden
ISBN-10 9780525558590
Release 2018-05-01
Pages 304
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A blistering critique of the forces threatening the American intelligence community, beginning with the President of the United States himself, in a time when that community's work has never been harder or more important In the face of a President who lobs accusations without facts, evidence, or logic, truth tellers are under attack. Meanwhile, the world order is teetering on the brink. North Korea is on the verge of having a nuclear weapon that could reach all of the United States, Russians have mastered a new form of information warfare that undercuts democracy, and the role of China in the global community remains unclear. There will always be value to experience and expertise, devotion to facts, humility in the face of complexity, and a respect for ideas, but in this moment they seem more important, and more endangered, than they've ever been. American Intelligence--the ultimate truth teller--has a responsibility in a post-truth world beyond merely warning of external dangers, and in The Assault on Intelligence, General Michael Hayden takes up that urgent work with profound passion, insight and authority. It is a sobering vision. The American intelligence community is more at risk than is commonly understood, for every good reason. Civil war or societal collapse is not necessarily imminent or inevitable, but our democracy's core structures, processes, and attitudes are under great stress. Many of the premises on which we have based our understanding of governance are now challenged, eroded, or simply gone. And we have a President in office who responds to overwhelming evidence from the intelligence community that the Russians are, by all acceptable standards of cyber conflict, in a state of outright war against us, not by leading a strong response, but by shooting the messenger. There are fundamental changes afoot in the world and in this country. The Assault on Intelligence shows us what they are, reveals how crippled we've become in our capacity to address them, and points toward a series of effective responses. Because when we lose our intelligence, literally and figuratively, democracy dies.



War and Decision

War and Decision Author Douglas J. Feith
ISBN-10 9780061763465
Release 2009-10-13
Pages 704
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In the years since the attacks of September 11, 2001, journalists, commentators, and others have published accounts of the Bush Administration's war on terrorism. But no senior Pentagon official has offered an inside view of those years, or has challenged the prevailing narrative of that war—until now. Douglas J. Feith, the head of the Pentagon's Policy organization, was a key member of Donald Rumsfeld's inner circle as the Administration weighed how to protect the nation from another 9/11. In War and Decision, he puts readers in the room with President Bush, Vice President Cheney, Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowitz, Condoleezza Rice, Colin Powell, General Tommy Franks, and other key players as the Administration devised its strategy and war plans. Drawing on thousands of previously undisclosed documents, notes, and other written sources, Feith details how the Administration launched a global effort to attack and disrupt terrorist networks; how it decided to overthrow the Saddam Hussein regime; how it came to impose an occupation on Iraq even though it had avoided one in Afghanistan; how some officials postponed or impeded important early steps that could have averted major problems in Iraq's post-Saddam period; and how the Administration's errors in war-related communications undermined the nation's credibility and put U.S. war efforts at risk. Even close followers of reporting on the Iraq war will be surprised at the new information Feith provides—presented here with balance and rigorous attention to detail. Among other revelations, War and Decision demonstrates that the most far-reaching warning of danger in Iraq was produced not by State or by the CIA, but by the Pentagon. It reveals the actual story behind the allegations that the Pentagon wanted to "anoint" Ahmad Chalabi as ruler of Iraq, and what really happened when the Pentagon challenged the CIA's work on the Iraq–al Qaida relationship. It offers the first accurate account of Iraq postwar planning—a topic widely misreported to date. And it presents surprising new portraits of Rumsfeld, Rice, Powell, Richard Armitage, L. Paul Bremer, and others—revealing how differences among them shaped U.S. policy. With its blend of vivid narrative, frank analysis, and elegant writing, War and Decision is like no other book on the Iraq war. It will interest those who have been troubled by conflicting accounts of the planning of the war, frustrated by the lack of firsthand insight into the decision-making process, or skeptical of conventional wisdom about Operation Iraqi Freedom and the global war on terrorism—efforts the author continues to support.



Spy Handler

Spy Handler Author Victor Cherkashin
ISBN-10 9780786724406
Release 2008-08-05
Pages 368
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In his four decades as a KGB officer, Victor Cherkashin was a central player in the shadowy world of Cold War espionage. From his rigorous training in Soviet intelligence in the early 1950s to his prime spot as the KGB's head of counterintelligence at the Soviet embassy in Washington, Cherkashin's career was rich in episode and drama. In a riveting memoir, Cherkashin provides a remarkable insider's view of the KGB's prolonged conflict with the CIA. Playing a major role in global espionage for most of the Cold War, Cherkashin was posted to stations in the United States, Australia, India, and Lebanon. He tracked down U.S. and British spies around the world. But it was in 1985 that Cherkashin scored two of the KGB's biggest-ever coups. In April of that year, he recruited disgruntled CIA officer Aldrich Ames and became his principal handler. Six months later, FBI special agent Robert Hanssen contacted Cherkashin directly, eventually becoming an even bigger asset than Ames. In Spy Handler, Cherkashin offers the complete account of how and why both Americans turned against their country, and addresses the rumors of an undiscovered KGB spy-another Hanssen or Ames-still at large in the U.S. intelligence community. Full of vivid detail and dramatic accounts that shed stark new light on the inner workings of the KGB, Spy Handler is a major addition to Cold War history, told by one of its major players.



The Tet Effect

The Tet Effect Author Jake Blood
ISBN-10 0415349974
Release 2005
Pages 212
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A close examination of the role of intelligence in shaping America’s perception of the Vietnam War, looking closely at the intelligence leadership and decision process. In 1967, intelligence was called upon to bolster support for the Vietnam War and allowed America’s leaders to portray a ‘bankrupt’ enemy ready to quit the battlefield. The audacious Tet Offensive of 1968 shattered this image and although it ended with an American military victory, it is remembered as the juncture when American support turned against the war. Public opinion on the war was a primary concern for the Johnson Administration, and US intelligence played a decisive role in providing an overly optimistic view of the enemy’s demise. As the "bankrupt" enemy attacked with a ferocity and intensity that shocked the American public, intelligence had set-up the American public for a fall. How, Americans wanted to know, could an enemy whose numbers had been so decimated now launch such an all-out offensive? From this examination and an understanding of how the enemy viewed itself, the conclusion is made that four severe breaches of intelligence etiquette occurred during the period leading up to Tet. This phenomenon is the ‘Tet effect’ – the loss of credibility when leaders portray a situation based upon intelligence that is shown to be disingenuous. This book will be of great interest to students of the Vietnam war, intelligence and strategic studies in general.



Worthy Fights

Worthy Fights Author Leon Panetta
ISBN-10 9780143127802
Release 2015-09-15
Pages 498
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Leon Panetta has had two of the most consequential careers of any American public servant in the past fifty years. His first, beginning as an army intelligence officer and including a run as one of Congress's most powerful and respected members, lasted 35 years and culminated in his role as Clinton's budget czar and White House chief of staff. He then 'retired' to establish the Panetta Institute,to serve on the Iraq Study Group; and to protect the California coast. In 2009 he accepted what many said was a thankless task: returning to public office as the director of the CIA.



Collapse of Rhodesia

Collapse of Rhodesia Author Josiah Brownell
ISBN-10 9780857718891
Release 2010-10-30
Pages 256
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In the years leading up to Rhodesia’s Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) in 1965, its small and transient white population was balanced precariously atop a large and fast-growing African population. This unstable political demography was set against the backdrop of continent-wide decolonisation and a parallel rise in African nationalism within Rhodesia. As the UDI rebellion moved into the 1970s, several political and economic factors combined to stretch the demographically fragile settler state to the breaking point. _x000D_ _x000D_ 'The Collapse of Rhodesia' is a controversial reexamination of these final decades of white minority rule. It lays out the case that racial population demographics and the pressures they produced were a pervasive, but hidden, force behind many of Rhodesia’s most dramatic political events, including UDI. It was within this context that the escalation of the guerrilla war in 1972 added new pressures and exacerbated pre-existing demographic frailties which eventually ended the decade and a half settler rebellion. The book argues that notwithstanding the settler state’s aggressive attempts to engineer racial demographics in the 1960s and 1970s, the UDI rebellion eventually failed because the state was unable to successfully redress white Rhodesia’s fundamental demographic weaknesses. As the product of extensive research in previously closed archives, the book reaches new conclusions that challenge many of Rhodesia’s historical orthodoxies. _x000D_ _x000D_ By addressing this vital demographic component of the multifaceted conflict, 'The Collapse of Rhodesia' is an important contribution to the historiography of the last years of white rule in Rhodesia.