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We the Jury

We  the Jury Author Jeffrey B. Abramson
ISBN-10 0674004302
Release 2000
Pages 308
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This magisterial book explores fascinating cases from American history to show how juries remain the heart of our system of criminal justice - and an essential element of our democracy. No other institution of government rivals the jury in placing power so directly in the hands of citizens. Jeffrey Abramson draws upon his own background as both a lawyer and a political theorist to capture the full democratic drama that is the jury. We, the Jury is a rare work of scholarship that brings the history of the jury alive and shows the origins of many of today's dilemmas surrounding juries and justice.



We the jury

We  the jury Author Jeffrey B. Abramson
ISBN-10 UOM:39015031817953
Release 1994
Pages 308
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Explores the evolution of the jury system from colonial days to the present, debates fundamental questions about the jury system, and examines cases from American history to show how juries form an essential element of democracy



We the Jury

We  the Jury Author Jeffrey Abramson
ISBN-10 0465091164
Release 1995-09
Pages 336
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Explores the evolution of the jury system from colonial days to the present, debates fundamental questions about the jury system, and examines cases from American history to show how juries form an essential element of democracy



The American Jury System

The American Jury System Author Randolph N. Jonakait
ISBN-10 0300129408
Release 2008-10-01
Pages 384
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How are juries selected in the United States? What forces influence juries in making their decisions? Are some cases simply beyond the ability of juries to decide? How useful is the entire jury system? In this important and accessible book, a prominent expert on constitutional law examines these and other issues concerning the American jury system. Randolph N. Jonakait describes the historical and social pressures that have driven the development of the jury system; contrasts the American jury system to the legal process in other countries; reveals subtle changes in the popular view of juries; examines how the news media, movies, and books portray and even affect the system; and discusses the empirical data that show how juries actually operate and what influences their decisions. Jonakait endorses the jury system in both civil and criminal cases, spelling out the important social role juries play in legitimizing and affirming the American justice system.



American Juries

American Juries Author Neil Vidmar
ISBN-10 9781615929870
Release 2007
Pages 428
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Although the right to trial by jury is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, in recent years both criminal and civil juries have been criticized as incompetent, biased, and irresponsible. For example, the O.J. Simpson criminal jury's verdict produced a racial divide in opinions about that trial. And many Americans still hold strong views about the jury that awarded millions of dollars to a woman who spilled a cup of McDonald's coffee on herself. It's said that there are judicial hellholes where local juries provide jackpot justice in medical malpractice and product liability cases with corporate defendants. Are these claims valid?This monumental and comprehensive volume reviews over fifty years of empirical research on civil and criminal juries and returns a verdict that strongly supports the jury system. Rather than relying on anecdotes, Vidmar and Hans-renowned scholars of the jury system-place the jury system in its historical and contemporary context, giving the stories behind important trials while providing fact-based answers to critical questions. How do juries make decisions and how do their verdicts compare to those of trial judges and technical experts? What roles do jury consultants play in influencing trial outcomes? Can juries understand complex expert testimony? Under which circumstances do capital juries decide to sentence a defendant to die? Are juries biased against doctors and big business? Should juries be allowed to give punitive damages? How do juries respond to the insanity defense? Do jurors ignore the law?Finally, the authors consider various suggestions for improving the way that juries are asked to carry out their duties. After briefly comparing the American jury to its counterparts in other nations, they conclude that our jury system, despite occasional problems, is, on balance, fair and democratic, and should remain an indispensable component of the judicial process for the foreseeable future.Neil Vidmar, PhD, (Durham, NC), is both the Russell M. Robinson II Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and a professor of psychology at Duke University. He has published over 100 research articles and is the author, coauthor, or editor of four books including Hans and Vidmar's widely acclaimed Judging the Jury (1986), Medical Malpractice and the American Jury, and World Jury Systems (2000).Valerie P. Hans, PhD (Ithaca, NY), is Professor of Law at Cornell University. She has published more than ninety research papers and articles and is the author, coauthor or editor of five books including Business on Trial (2000); Judging the Jury (1986) and The Jury System (2006). She also serves on the editorial boards of major professional journals in the field of law and social science.



Crime and Justice

Crime and Justice Author Carolyn Boyes-Watson
ISBN-10 9781538106914
Release 2018-03-08
Pages 470
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Crime and Justice offers a comprehensive introduction to the U.S criminal justice system through fifteen historical and contemporary case studies. The third edition has been revised and streamlined throughout, featuring new material on race, the war on drugs, police violence, “stand your ground” laws and gun laws, and more. Each chapter opens with an engaging case study followed by an explanatory chapter that teaches core concepts, key terms, and critical issues. The cases serve multiple learning objectives: illustrating concepts applied in real life; exploring sociological issues of race, class, gender, and power; and teaching students the law and processes of the justice system. Crime and Justice is excellent for any course that introduces students to the criminal justice system. A complimentary Instructor’s Manual and Test Bank are available, as well as an open-access Companion Website for students that includes interactive flashcards, links to online video and media, and other learning material. Visit http://textbooks.rowman.com/boyes-watson3e or email [email protected] for more information.



Why Jury Duty Matters

Why Jury Duty Matters Author Andrew G. Ferguson
ISBN-10 9780814729038
Release 2012-12-01
Pages 234
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Places the idea of jury duty into perspective, noting its importance as a constitutional responsibility, and describes ways in which the experience may be enriched.



Against Democracy

Against Democracy Author Jason Brennan
ISBN-10 9781400888399
Release 2017-09-26
Pages 312
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Most people believe democracy is a uniquely just form of government. They believe people have the right to an equal share of political power. And they believe that political participation is good for us—it empowers us, helps us get what we want, and tends to make us smarter, more virtuous, and more caring for one another. These are some of our most cherished ideas about democracy. But Jason Brennan says they are all wrong. In this trenchant book, Brennan argues that democracy should be judged by its results—and the results are not good enough. Just as defendants have a right to a fair trial, citizens have a right to competent government. But democracy is the rule of the ignorant and the irrational, and it all too often falls short. Furthermore, no one has a fundamental right to any share of political power, and exercising political power does most of us little good. On the contrary, a wide range of social science research shows that political participation and democratic deliberation actually tend to make people worse—more irrational, biased, and mean. Given this grim picture, Brennan argues that a new system of government—epistocracy, the rule of the knowledgeable—may be better than democracy, and that it's time to experiment and find out. A challenging critique of democracy and the first sustained defense of the rule of the knowledgeable, Against Democracy is essential reading for scholars and students of politics across the disciplines. Featuring a new preface that situates the book within the current political climate and discusses other alternatives beyond epistocracy, Against Democracy is a challenging critique of democracy and the first sustained defense of the rule of the knowledgeable.



Japan and Civil Jury Trials

Japan and Civil Jury Trials Author Matthew J. Wilson
ISBN-10 9781783479191
Release 2015-08-28
Pages 208
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With effective solutions in both criminal and civil disputes at a premium, reformers have advanced varied forms of jury systems as a means of fostering positive political, economic, and social change. Many countries have recently integrated lay partici



Juries on Trial

Juries on Trial Author Paula DiPerna
ISBN-10 UOM:39015008699426
Release 1984
Pages 248
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Explains how juries are selected and hear cases, traces the history of trial by jury, and looks at sample cases



Punishment Participatory Democracy and the Jury

Punishment  Participatory Democracy  and the Jury Author Albert W. Dzur
ISBN-10 9780199874095
Release 2012-09-13
Pages 221
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Focusing democratic theory on the pressing issue of punishment, Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury argues for participatory institutional designs as antidotes to the American penal state. Citizen action in institutions like the jury and restorative justice programs can foster the attunement, reflectiveness, and full-bodied communication needed as foundations for widespread civic responsibility for criminal justice.



The Life and Death of Democracy

The Life and Death of Democracy Author John Keane
ISBN-10 9781847377609
Release 2009-06-01
Pages 992
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John Keane's The Life and Death of Democracy will inspire and shock its readers. Presenting the first grand history of democracy for well over a century, it poses along the way some tough and timely questions: can we really be sure that democracy had its origins in ancient Greece? How did democratic ideals and institutions come to have the shape they do today? Given all the recent fanfare about democracy promotion, why are many people now gripped by the feeling that a bad moon is rising over all the world's democracies? Do they indeed have a future? Or is perhaps democracy fated to melt away, along with our polar ice caps? The work of one of Britain's leading political writers, this is no mere antiquarian history. Stylishly written, this superb book confronts its readers with an entirely fresh and irreverent look at the past, present and future of democracy. It unearths the beginnings of such precious institutions and ideals as government by public assembly, votes for women, the secret ballot, trial by jury and press freedom. It tracks the changing, hotly disputed meanings of democracy and describes quite a few of the extraordinary characters, many of them long forgotten, who dedicated their lives to building or defending democracy. And it explains why democracy is still potentially the best form of government on earth -- and why democracies everywhere are sleepwalking their way into deep trouble.



Disputes and Democracy

Disputes and Democracy Author Steven Johnstone
ISBN-10 9780292788558
Release 2010-07-05
Pages 223
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Athenians performed democracy daily in their law courts. Without lawyers or judges, private citizens, acting as accusers and defendants, argued their own cases directly to juries composed typically of 201 to 501 jurors, who voted on a verdict without deliberation. This legal system strengthened and perpetuated democracy as Athenians understood it, for it emphasized the ideological equality of all (male) citizens and the hierarchy that placed them above women, children, and slaves. This study uses Athenian court speeches to trace the consequences for both disputants and society of individuals' decisions to turn their quarrels into legal cases. Steven Johnstone describes the rhetorical strategies that prosecutors and defendants used to persuade juries and shows how these strategies reveal both the problems and the possibilities of language in the Athenian courts. He argues that Athenian "law" had no objective existence outside the courts and was, therefore, itself inherently rhetorical. This daring new interpretation advances an understanding of Athenian democracy that is not narrowly political, but rather links power to the practices of a particular institution.



Let s Get Free

Let s Get Free Author Paul Butler
ISBN-10 9781595585103
Release 2010-06-08
Pages 224
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Drawing on his personal fascinating story as a prosecutor, a defendant, and an observer of the legal process, Paul Butler offers a sharp and engaging critique of our criminal justice system. He argues against discriminatory drug laws and excessive police power and shows how our policy of mass incarceration erodes communities and perpetuates crime. Controversially, he supports jury nullification—or voting “not guilty” out of principle—as a way for everyday people to take a stand against unfair laws, and he joins with the “Stop Snitching” movement, arguing that the reliance on informants leads to shoddy police work and distrust within communities. Butler offers instead a “hip hop theory of justice,” parsing the messages about crime and punishment found in urban music and culture. Butler’s argument is powerful, edgy, and incisive.



A Crime of Self Defense

A Crime of Self Defense Author George P. Fletcher
ISBN-10 0226253341
Release 1990-06-15
Pages 272
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Legal expert George Fletcher uses the celebrated trial of New York's "Subway Vigilante", Bernhard Goetz, as a springboard to probe the profound relationship between this defensive action, the public's understanding of it, and the court's interpretation of it according to the law.



The Jury and Democracy

The Jury and Democracy Author John Gastil
ISBN-10 9780199888535
Release 2010-11-10
Pages 288
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Alexis de Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, and the U.S. Supreme Court have all alleged that jury service promotes civic and political engagement, yet none could prove it. Finally, The Jury and Democracy provides compelling systematic evidence to support this view. Drawing from in-depth interviews, thousands of juror surveys, and court and voting records from across the United States, the authors show that serving on a jury can trigger changes in how citizens view themselves, their peers, and their government--and can even significantly increase electoral turnout among infrequent voters. Jury service also sparks long-term shifts in media use, political action, and community involvement. In an era when involved Americans are searching for ways to inspire their fellow citizens, The Jury and Democracy offers a plausible and realistic path for turning passive spectators into active political participants.



The Jury

The Jury Author Stephen J. Adler
ISBN-10 UOM:39015054303733
Release 1994
Pages 285
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Argues that the American jury system produces inconsistent and, sometimes, illogical verdicts, looks at seven actual cases, and suggests ways to improve the jury system