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Whiteness and Racialized Ethnic Groups in the United States

Whiteness and Racialized Ethnic Groups in the United States Author Sherrow O. Pinder
ISBN-10 9780739164891
Release 2012
Pages 195
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This book, about the genealogy of whiteness, racialized ethnic groups, and the future of race relations in the United States, is for undergraduate or graduate courses including political science, ethnic studies, American Studies, and multicultural and gender studies. Also, it is accessible and of interest to a broader audience, including the general public who are interested in the future of race relations in the United States.



Colorblindness Post raciality and Whiteness in the United States

Colorblindness  Post raciality  and Whiteness in the United States Author Sherrow O. Pinder
ISBN-10 9781137431103
Release 2015-08-18
Pages 216
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This book problematizes the ways in which the discourses of colorblindness and post-raciality are articulated in the age of Obama. Pinder debunks the myth that race does not matter and reconsiders the presumptive hegemony of whiteness through the dialectics of visibility and invisibility of race.



American Multicultural Studies

American Multicultural Studies Author Sherrow O. Pinder
ISBN-10 9781412998024
Release 2013
Pages 516
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American Multicultural Studies: Diversity of Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Sexuality provides an interdisciplinary view of multicultural studies in the United States, addressing a wide range of topics that continue to define and shape this area of study. Through this collection of essays Sherrow Pinder responds to the need to open up a rich avenue for addressing current and continuing issues of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, cultural diversity, and education in their varied forms. Substantial thematic overlaps are found between sections and essays, all of which are oriented toward a single broad objective: to develop new and different ways of addressing how multicultural issues, in their discursive sociocultural contexts, are inextricably linked to the operations of power. Power, as a site of resistance to which it invariably gives rise, is tacked from a perspective that attends to the complexities of America’s history and politics.



The Politics of Race and Ethnicity in the United States

The Politics of Race and Ethnicity in the United States Author Sherrow O. Pinder
ISBN-10 9781137368607
Release 2013-05-15
Pages 268
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Asks pertinent questions about the part race plays in determining nature of American identity and culture



How Race Is Made in America

How Race Is Made in America Author Natalia Molina
ISBN-10 9780520280076
Release 2014
Pages 207
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How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity. Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scripts, which highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.



Signifyin g Sanctifyin Slam Dunking

Signifyin g   Sanctifyin    Slam Dunking Author Gena Dagel Caponi
ISBN-10 155849183X
Release 1999
Pages 467
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Observers of American society have long noted the distinctive contribution of African Americans to the nation's cultural life. We find references to African American music and dance, black forms of oral expression, even a black style of playing basketball. But what do such terms really mean? Is it legitimate to talk about a distinct African American aesthetic, or is this simply a vestige of an outmoded racial essentialism? What makes a particular form of cultural expression "black" other than the fact that some African Americans may practice it? These are some of the questions addressed in the readings gathered in this volume by Gena Dagel Caponi. The essays, some previously published and others new, spring from a variety of disciplines and cover a broad range of topics, from the communal ritual of the ring shout to the evolution of rap to the improvisational genius of Michael Jordan. While each piece focuses on a different aspect of African American expressive culture, together they reveal a set of creative principles, techniques, and practices -- a cultural aesthetic -- that is remarkably consistent and resilient.



Politics Beyond Black and White

Politics Beyond Black and White Author Lauren D. Davenport
ISBN-10 9781108425988
Release 2018-03-29
Pages
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This book investigates the social and political implications of the US multiracial population, which has surged in recent decades.



Remembering Generations

Remembering Generations Author Ashraf H. A. Rushdy
ISBN-10 9780807875582
Release 2003-01-14
Pages 224
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Slavery is America's family secret, a partially hidden phantom that continues to haunt our national imagination. Remembering Generations explores how three contemporary African American writers artistically represent this notion in novels about the enduring effects of slavery on the descendants of slaves in the post-civil rights era. Focusing on Gayl Jones's Corregidora (1975), David Bradley's The Chaneysville Incident (1981), and Octavia Butler's Kindred (1979), Ashraf Rushdy situates these works in their cultural moment of production, highlighting the ways in which they respond to contemporary debates about race and family. Tracing the evolution of this literary form, he considers such works as Edward Ball's Slaves in the Family (1998), in which descendants of slaveholders expose the family secrets of their ancestors. Remembering Generations examines how cultural works contribute to social debates, how a particular representational form emerges out of a specific historical epoch, and how some contemporary intellectuals meditate on the issue of historical responsibility--of recognizing that the slave past continues to exert an influence on contemporary American society.



The Possessive Investment in Whiteness

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness Author George Lipsitz
ISBN-10 9781592134953
Release 2009-08-21
Pages 312
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A widely influential book--revised to reveal racial privilege at work in the 21st century.



America s Original Sin

America s Original Sin Author Jim Wallis
ISBN-10 9781493403486
Release 2016-01-12
Pages 272
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America's problem with race has deep roots, with the country's foundation tied to the near extermination of one race of people and the enslavement of another. Racism is truly our nation's original sin. "It's time we right this unacceptable wrong," says bestselling author and leading Christian activist Jim Wallis. Fifty years ago, Wallis was driven away from his faith by a white church that considered dealing with racism to be taboo. His participation in the civil rights movement brought him back when he discovered a faith that commands racial justice. Yet as recent tragedies confirm, we continue to suffer from the legacy of racism. The old patterns of white privilege are colliding with the changing demographics of a diverse nation. The church has been slow to respond, and Sunday morning is still the most segregated hour of the week. In America's Original Sin, Wallis offers a prophetic and deeply personal call to action in overcoming the racism so ingrained in American society. He speaks candidly to Christians--particularly white Christians--urging them to cross a new bridge toward racial justice and healing. Whenever divided cultures and gridlocked power structures fail to end systemic sin, faith communities can help lead the way to grassroots change. Probing yet positive, biblically rooted yet highly practical, this book shows people of faith how they can work together to overcome the embedded racism in America, galvanizing a movement to cross the bridge to a multiracial church and a new America.



The History of White People

The History of White People Author Nell Irvin Painter
ISBN-10 039307949X
Release 2011-04-18
Pages 448
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A New York Times bestseller: “This terrific new book . . . [explores] the ‘notion of whiteness,’ an idea as dangerous as it is seductive.”—Boston Globe Telling perhaps the most important forgotten story in American history, eminent historian Nell Irvin Painter guides us through more than two thousand years of Western civilization, illuminating not only the invention of race but also the frequent praise of “whiteness” for economic, scientific, and political ends. A story filled with towering historical figures, The History of White People closes a huge gap in literature that has long focused on the non-white and forcefully reminds us that the concept of “race” is an all-too-human invention whose meaning, importance, and reality have changed as it has been driven by a long and rich history of events.



Building an American Empire

Building an American Empire Author Paul Frymer
ISBN-10 9781400885350
Release 2017-05-02
Pages 312
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How American westward expansion was governmentally engineered to promote the formation of a white settler nation Westward expansion of the United States is most conventionally remembered for rugged individualism, geographic isolationism, and a fair amount of luck. Yet the establishment of the forty-eight contiguous states was hardly a foregone conclusion, and the federal government played a critical role in its success. This book examines the politics of American expansion, showing how the government's regulation of population movements on the frontier, both settlement and removal, advanced national aspirations for empire and promoted the formation of a white settler nation. Building an American Empire details how a government that struggled to exercise plenary power used federal land policy to assert authority over the direction of expansion by engineering the pace and patterns of settlement and to control the movement of populations. At times, the government mobilized populations for compact settlement in strategically important areas of the frontier; at other times, policies were designed to actively restrain settler populations in order to prevent violence, international conflict, and breakaway states. Paul Frymer examines how these settlement patterns helped construct a dominant racial vision for America by incentivizing and directing the movement of white European settlers onto indigenous and diversely populated lands. These efforts were hardly seamless, and Frymer pays close attention to the failures as well, from the lack of further expansion into Latin America to the defeat of the black colonization movement. Building an American Empire reveals the lasting and profound significance government settlement policies had for the nation, both for establishing America as dominantly white and for restricting broader aspirations for empire in lands that could not be so racially engineered.



Hawaiian Blood

Hawaiian Blood Author J. Kēhaulani Kauanui
ISBN-10 9780822391494
Release 2008-10-17
Pages 258
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In the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act (HHCA) of 1921, the U.S. Congress defined “native Hawaiians” as those people “with at least one-half blood quantum of individuals inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands prior to 1778.” This “blood logic” has since become an entrenched part of the legal system in Hawai‘i. Hawaiian Blood is the first comprehensive history and analysis of this federal law that equates Hawaiian cultural identity with a quantifiable amount of blood. J. Kēhaulani Kauanui explains how blood quantum classification emerged as a way to undermine Native Hawaiian (Kanaka Maoli) sovereignty. Within the framework of the 50-percent rule, intermarriage “dilutes” the number of state-recognized Native Hawaiians. Thus, rather than support Native claims to the Hawaiian islands, blood quantum reduces Hawaiians to a racial minority, reinforcing a system of white racial privilege bound to property ownership. Kauanui provides an impassioned assessment of how the arbitrary correlation of ancestry and race imposed by the U.S. government on the indigenous people of Hawai‘i has had far-reaching legal and cultural effects. With the HHCA, the federal government explicitly limited the number of Hawaiians included in land provisions, and it recast Hawaiians’ land claims in terms of colonial welfare rather than collective entitlement. Moreover, the exclusionary logic of blood quantum has profoundly affected cultural definitions of indigeneity by undermining more inclusive Kanaka Maoli notions of kinship and belonging. Kauanui also addresses the ongoing significance of the 50-percent rule: Its criteria underlie recent court decisions that have subverted the Hawaiian sovereignty movement and brought to the fore charged questions about who counts as Hawaiian.



Black Looks

Black Looks Author bell hooks
ISBN-10 9781317588481
Release 2014-10-10
Pages 212
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In the critical essays collected in Black Looks, bell hooks interrogates old narratives and argues for alternative ways to look at blackness, black subjectivity, and whiteness. Her focus is on spectatorship—in particular, the way blackness and black people are experienced in literature, music, television, and especially film—and her aim is to create a radical intervention into the way we talk about race and representation. As she describes: "the essays in Black Looks are meant to challenge and unsettle, to disrupt and subvert." As students, scholars, activists, intellectuals, and any other readers who have engaged with the book since its original release in 1992 can attest, that's exactly what these pieces do.



La Raza Law Journal

La Raza Law Journal Author
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105062248898
Release 1998
Pages
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La Raza Law Journal has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from La Raza Law Journal also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full La Raza Law Journal book for free.



Racism without Racists

Racism without Racists Author Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
ISBN-10 9781442276246
Release 2017-06-09
Pages 376
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Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.



Multiculturalism in the United States

Multiculturalism in the United States Author Peter Kivisto
ISBN-10 9781452251745
Release 2000-02-18
Pages 568
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This reader focuses on the extremely current, important topic of racial and ethnic experiences in the United States today. Most of the essays were commissioned especially for this reader and have been prepared by some of the brightest voices in this cutting edge field. Instructors in search of a current, comprehensive multicultural reader will find this a valuable student resource whether it is the sole focus of their course or to be integrated into another content area.