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Women and Gender in the New South

Women and Gender in the New South Author Elizabeth Hayes Turner
ISBN-10 STANFORD:36105132284147
Release 2008-12-16
Pages 271
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In every age and in every culture there have been women who challenged the prevailing gender prescriptions and struck a nerve, resulting in waves of either change or repression. In Women and Gender in the New South, Elizabeth Hayes Turner draws on a multiplicity of sources—part of the great outpouring of works in the field of women’s history that has emerged in the past 40 years—to bring together in one volume the history of conservative, moderate, and even radical women’s groups. The book demonstrates how women and men from different racial and economic backgrounds not only weathered but also shaped the political and cultural landscape of the New South. Employing women's history, gender analysis, and race and class studies, Women and Gender in the New South shapes this accumulated scholarship into an interpretative overlay that takes southern women and men from the ravages of one war to the opportunities of another.



Hidden Histories of Women in the New South

Hidden Histories of Women in the New South Author Virginia Bernhard
ISBN-10 0826209580
Release 1994
Pages 253
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Representing some of the best and most recent scholarly work in the field, the subjects of these essays reflect the diversity of southern women's lives. Women in prisons, in mental institutions, in labor unions; women activists for temperance, suffrage, birth control, and civil rights; women at home and in public life: all add their individual histories to help reshape the terrain of the American past.



An Architecture of Education

An Architecture of Education Author Angel David Nieves
ISBN-10 9781580469098
Release 2018-06-20
Pages 256
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Examines material culture and the act of institution creation, especially through architecture and landscape, to recount a deeper history of the lives of African American women in the post-Civil War South.



Entering the Fray

Entering the Fray Author Jonathan Daniel Wells
ISBN-10 9780826272089
Release 2009-12-01
Pages 248
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The study of the New South has in recent decades been greatly enriched by research into gender, reshaping our understanding of the struggle for woman suffrage, the conflicted nature of race and class in the South, the complex story of politics, and the role of family and motherhood in black and white society. This book brings together nine essays that examine the importance of gender, race, and culture in the New South, offering a rich and varied analysis of the multifaceted role of gender in the lives of black and white southerners in the troubled decades of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ranging widely from conservative activism by white women in 1920s Georgia to political involvement by black women in 1950s Memphis, many of these essays focus on southern women’s increasing public activities and high-profile images in the twentieth century. They tell how women shouldered responsibilities for local, national, and international interests; but just as nineteenth-century women’s status could be at risk from too much public presence, women of the New South stepped gingerly into the public arena, taking care to work within what they considered their current gender limitations. The authors—both established and up-and-coming scholars—take on subjects that reflect wide-ranging, sophisticated, and diverse scholarship on black and white women in the New South. They include the efforts of female Home Demonstration Agents to defeat debilitating diseases in rural Florida and the increasing participation of women in historic preservation at Monticello. They also reflect unique personal stories as diverse as lobbyist Kathryn Dunaway’s efforts to defeat the Equal Rights Amendment in Georgia and Susan Smith’s depiction by the national media as a racist southerner during coverage of her children’s deaths. Taken together, these nine essays contribute to the picture of women increasing their movement into political and economic life while all too often still maintaining their gendered place as determined by society. Their rich insights provide new ways to consider the meaning and role of gender in the post–Civil War South.



Gender and Jim Crow

Gender and Jim Crow Author Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore
ISBN-10 9781469612454
Release 2013-04-01
Pages 410
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Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argues that the ideology of white supremacy embodied in the Jim Crow laws of the turn of the century profoundly reordered society and that within this environment, black women crafted an enduring tradition of political activism. According to Gilmore, a generation of educated African American women emerged in the 1890s to become, in effect, diplomats to the white community after the disfranchisement of their husbands, brothers, and fathers. Using the lives of African American women to tell the larger story, Gilmore chronicles black women's political strategies, their feminism, and their efforts to forge political ties with white women. Her analysis highlights the active role played by women of both races in the political process and in the emergence of southern progressivism. In addition, Gilmore illuminates the manipulation of concepts of gender by white supremacists and shows how this rhetoric changed once women, black and white, gained the vote.



Gender in Georgia

Gender in Georgia Author Maia Barkaia
ISBN-10 9781785336768
Release 2017-11-10
Pages 250
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As Georgia seeks to reinvent itself as a nation-state in the post-Soviet period, Georgian women are maneuvering, adjusting, resisting and transforming the new economic, social and political order. In Gender in Georgia, editors Maia Barkaia and Alisse Waterston bring together an international group of feminist scholars to explore the socio-political and cultural conditions that have shaped gender dynamics in Georgia from the late 19th century to the present. In doing so, they provide the first-ever woman-centered collection of research on Georgia, offering a feminist critique of power in its many manifestations, and an assessment of women's political agency in Georgia.



Laboring Women

Laboring Women Author Jennifer L. Morgan
ISBN-10 9780812206371
Release 2011-09-12
Pages 296
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When black women were brought from Africa to the New World as slave laborers, their value was determined by their ability to work as well as their potential to bear children, who by law would become the enslaved property of the mother's master. In Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, Jennifer L. Morgan examines for the first time how African women's labor in both senses became intertwined in the English colonies. Beginning with the ideological foundations of racial slavery in early modern Europe, Laboring Women traverses the Atlantic, exploring the social and cultural lives of women in West Africa, slaveowners' expectations for reproductive labor, and women's lives as workers and mothers under colonial slavery. Challenging conventional wisdom, Morgan reveals how expectations regarding gender and reproduction were central to racial ideologies, the organization of slave labor, and the nature of slave community and resistance. Taking into consideration the heritage of Africans prior to enslavement and the cultural logic of values and practices recreated under the duress of slavery, she examines how women's gender identity was defined by their shared experiences as agricultural laborers and mothers, and shows how, given these distinctions, their situation differed considerably from that of enslaved men. Telling her story through the arc of African women's actual lives—from West Africa, to the experience of the Middle Passage, to life on the plantations—she offers a thoughtful look at the ways women's reproductive experience shaped their roles in communities and helped them resist some of the more egregious effects of slave life. Presenting a highly original, theoretically grounded view of reproduction and labor as the twin pillars of female exploitation in slavery, Laboring Women is a distinctive contribution to the literature of slavery and the history of women.



Gender and the new South African legal order

Gender and the new South African legal order Author Christina Murray
ISBN-10 UVA:X002651903
Release 1994
Pages 255
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Gender and the new South African legal order has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Gender and the new South African legal order also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Gender and the new South African legal order book for free.



New Women of the New South

New Women of the New South Author Marjorie Spruill Wheeler
ISBN-10 9780195082456
Release 1993
Pages 280
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Until this engaging and pioneering account was printed, historians had no comprehensive history of the women's suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important book focuses on 11 of the movement's most prominent leaders, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights.



Women Gender Remittances and Development in the Global South

Women  Gender  Remittances and Development in the Global South Author Ton van Naerssen
ISBN-10 9781134778003
Release 2016-03-09
Pages 286
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This book endeavours to take the conceptualisation of the relationship between transnational remittance exchanges and gender to a new level. Thus, inevitably, it provides a number of case studies of relationships between gender and remittances from around the world, highlighting different processes and practises. Thereby the authors seek to understand the impact of remittances on gender and gender relations, both at the sending as well as at the receiving end. For each case study authors ask how remittances affect gender identities and relationships but also vice versa. By itself this already adds a wealth of insights to a field that is remarkably understudied despite a volume of studies on gender and the feminization of migration in developing contexts. Chapters take an open, explorative approach to the relationship between gender and remittance behaviour with the aid of case studies focusing on transnational flows between migrants and countries of origin. With the wide variety of cases this book is able to provide conceptual insights to better understand how remittances affect gender identity, roles and relations (at both the receiving and sending end) and give specific attention to the roles of various actors directly and indirectly involved in remittance sending in current collectively organized remittance schemes from around the world.



Rethinking New Womanhood

Rethinking New Womanhood Author Nazia Hussein
ISBN-10 9783319679006
Release 2018-04-09
Pages 231
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Covering India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Nepal, Rethinking New Womanhood effectively introduces a ‘new’ wave of gender research from South Asia that resonates with feminist debates around the world. The volume conceptualises ‘new womanhood’ as a complex, heterogeneous and intersectional identity. By deconstructing classification systems and highlighting women’s everyday ongoing negotiations with boundaries of social categories, the book reconfigures the concept of ‘new woman’ as a symbolic identity denoting ‘modern’ femininity at the intersection of gender, class, culture, sexuality and religion in South Asia. The collection maps new sites and expressions on women and gender studies around nationhood, women’s rights, transnational feminist solidarity, ‘new girlhoods ’, aesthetic and sexualised labour, respectability and ‘modernity’, LGBT discourses, domestic violence and ‘new’ feminisms. The volume will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines including gender studies, sociology, education, media and cultural studies, literature, anthropology, history, development studies, postcolonial studies and South Asian studies.



Within the Plantation Household

Within the Plantation Household Author Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
ISBN-10 9780807864227
Release 2000-11-09
Pages 563
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Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.



Chained in Silence

Chained in Silence Author Talitha L. LeFlouria
ISBN-10 9781469622484
Release 2015-04-27
Pages 280
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In 1868, the state of Georgia began to make its rapidly growing population of prisoners available for hire. The resulting convict leasing system ensnared not only men but also African American women, who were forced to labor in camps and factories to make profits for private investors. In this vivid work of history, Talitha L. LeFlouria draws from a rich array of primary sources to piece together the stories of these women, recounting what they endured in Georgia's prison system and what their labor accomplished. LeFlouria argues that African American women's presence within the convict lease and chain-gang systems of Georgia helped to modernize the South by creating a new and dynamic set of skills for black women. At the same time, female inmates struggled to resist physical and sexual exploitation and to preserve their human dignity within a hostile climate of terror. This revealing history redefines the social context of black women's lives and labor in the New South and allows their stories to be told for the first time.



Unruly Women

Unruly Women Author Victoria E. Bynum
ISBN-10 9781469616995
Release 2016-08-01
Pages 250
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In this richly detailed and imaginatively researched study, Victoria Bynum investigates "unruly" women in central North Carolina before and during the Civil War. Analyzing the complex and interrelated impact of gender, race, class, and region on the lives of black and white women, she shows how their diverse experiences and behavior reflected and influenced the changing social order and political economy of the state and region. Her work expands our knowledge of black and white women by studying them outside the plantation setting. Bynum searched local and state court records, public documents, and manuscript collections to locate and document the lives of these otherwise ordinary, obscure women. Some appeared in court as abused, sometimes abusive, wives, as victims and sometimes perpetrators of violent assaults, or as participants in ilicit, interracial relationships. During the Civil War, women freqently were cited for theft, trespassing, or rioting, usually in an effort to gain goods made scarce by war. Some women were charged with harboring evaders or deserters of the Confederacy, an act that reflected their conviction that the Confederacy was destroying them. These politically powerless unruly women threatened to disrupt the underlying social structure of the Old South, which depended on the services and cooperation of all women. Bynum examines the effects of women's social and sexual behavior on the dominant society and shows the ways in which power flowed between private and public spheres. Whether wives or unmarried, enslaved or free, women were active agents of the society's ordering and dissolution.



Women Gender and Everyday Social Transformation in India

Women  Gender and Everyday Social Transformation in India Author Kenneth Bo Nielsen
ISBN-10 9781783082698
Release 2014-08-01
Pages 262
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The pace of socioeconomic transformation in India over the past two and a half decades has been formidable. This volume sheds light on how these transformations have played out at the level of everyday life to influence the lives of Indian women, and gender relations more broadly. Through ethnographically grounded case studies, the authors portray the contradictory and contested co-existence of discrepant gendered norms, values and visions in a society caught up in wider processes of sociopolitical change. ‘Women, Gender and Everyday Social Transformation in India’ moves the debate on gender and social transformation into the domain of everyday life to arrive at locally embedded and detailed, ethnographically informed analyses of gender relations in real-life contexts that foreground both subtle and not-so-subtle negotiations and contestations.



Civil War as a Crisis in Gender

Civil War as a Crisis in Gender Author LeeAnn Whites
ISBN-10 0820322091
Release 2000-03-01
Pages 288
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Gender is the last vantage point from which the Civil War has yet to be examined in-depth, says LeeAnn Whites. Gender concepts and constructions, Whites says, deeply influenced the beliefs underpinning both the Confederacy and its vestiges to which white southerners clung for decades after the Confederacy's defeat. Whites's arguments and observations, which center on the effects of the conflict on the South's gender hierarchy, will challenge our understanding of the war and our acceptance of its historiography. The ordering principle of gender roles and relations in the antebellum South, says Whites, was a form of privileged white male identity against which others in that society were measured and accorded worth and meaning--women, wives, children, and slaves. Over the course of the Civil War the power of these men to so arbitrarily construct their world all but vanished, owing to a succession of hardships that culminated in defeat and the end of slavery. At the same time, Confederate women were steadily--and ambivalently--empowered. Drawn out of their domestic sphere, these women labored and sacrificed to prop up an apparently hollow notion of essential manliness that rested in part on an assumption of female docility and weakness. Whites focuses on Augusta, Georgia, to follow these events as they were played out in the lives of actual men and women. An antebellum cotton trading center, Augusta was central to the Confederacy's supply network and later became an exemplary New South manufacturing city. Drawing on primary sources from private family papers to census data, Whites traces the interplay of power and subordination, self-interest and loyalty, as she discusses topics related to the gender crisis in Augusta, including female kin networks, women's volunteer organizations, class and race divisions, emancipation, Sherman's invasion of Georgia, veteran aid societies, rural migration to cities, and the postwar employment of white women and children in industry. Whites concludes with an account of how elite white Augustans "reconstructed" themselves in the postwar years. By memorializing their dead and mythologizing their history in a way that presented the war as a valiant defense of antebellum domesticity, these Augustans sought to restore a patriarchy--however attenuated--that would deflect the class strains of industrial development while maintaining what it could of the old Southern gender and racial order. Inherent in this effort, as during the war, was an unspoken admission by the white men of Augusta of their dependency upon white women. A pioneering volume in Civil War history, this important study opens new debates and avenues of inquiry in culture and gender studies.



New South Asian Feminisms

New South Asian Feminisms Author Srila Roy
ISBN-10 9781780321929
Release 2012-12-13
Pages 208
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South Asian feminism is in crisis. Under constant attack from right-wing nationalism and religious fundamentalism and co-opted by 'NGO-ization' and neoliberal state agendas, once autonomous and radical forms of feminist mobilization have been ideologically fragmented and replaced. It is time to rethink the feminist political agenda for the predicaments of the present. This timely volume provides an original and unprecedented exploration of the current state of South Asian feminist politics. It will map the new sites and expressions of feminism in the region today, addressing issues like disability, Internet technologies, queer subjectivities and violence as everyday life across national boundaries, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Written by young scholars from the region, this book addresses the generational divide of feminism in the region, effectively introducing a new 'wave' of South Asian feminists that resonates with feminist debates everywhere around the globe.